Echiniscus arctomys Ehrenberg, 1853 sensu

Kaczmarek, Łukasz, Michalczyk, Łukasz & Mcinnes, Sandra J., 2015, Annotated zoogeography of non-marine Tardigrada. Part II: South America, Zootaxa 3923 (1), pp. 1-107: 10

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3923.1.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:2305A96C-0A03-4524-93AA-90359893A4DD

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/038FA02E-FF95-7A35-4A85-BB7A56F4F555

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Echiniscus arctomys Ehrenberg, 1853 sensu
status

sensu

10. Echiniscus arctomys Ehrenberg, 1853 sensu  lato [T]

Terra typica: Switzerland (Europe)

Argentina:

• 41 ° 59 ′S, 71 ° 34 ′W; 300 m asl: Rio Negro Province, El Bolsón, Valley of Rio Azul, mosses on tree ( Myrceugenia exupca  ) in the Myrceugenia exupca  - Nothofagus dombeyi  marsh forest. Iharos (1963)

• 41 ° 59 ′S, 71 ° 31 ′W; 360 m asl: Rio Negro Province, El Bolsón, foot of Piltriquitron Mt., mosses on wet cliff of promontory, partly on soil and mosses on dry ledge (2 samples). Iharos (1963)

• 41 ° 59 ′S, 71 ° 31 ′W; 460 m asl: Negro Province, El Bolsón, foot of Piltriquitron Mt., live and decayed mosses on and under stones on cliff. Iharos (1963)

Brazil:

• 22 ° 58 ′S, 43 ° 15 ′W; 450 m asl: Rio de Janeiro State, neighbourhood of Rio de Janeiro, Tijuca National Park, mosses and algae. Rahm (1931, 1932)

Record numbers: Argentina: 3, Brazil: 1; total: 4.

Remarks: Currently E. arctomys  is considered a species complex nested within a larger group ( arctomys  group - sensu Ramazzotti  & Maucci 1983), defined via a single pair of body cirri but with variable cuticle sculpture and other morphological traits. The loss of body cirri is a potential homoplasy while diverse cuticular sculpture and other traits require a number of evolutionary steps, so it is very likely that the arctomys  group (sensu Ramazzotti  & Maucci 1983) is polyphyletic, but this has to be verified via integrated morphological and molecular techniques.

The nominal species of the complex was originally described from Europe ( Ehrenberg 1853), so this South American record requires confirmation.