Aphthargelia rumbleboredomia , Jensen, Andrew S., 2013

Jensen, Andrew S., 2013, The aphid genus Aphthargelia Hottes (Hemiptera: Aphididae), with one new species, Zootaxa 3701 (3), pp. 381-392: 384-388

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3701.3.7

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:9228518D-31C3-4F8B-9FDD-4F2FB0EEA606

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/039987C8-1308-A86C-39EA-34A7FA010716

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Aphthargelia rumbleboredomia
status

sp. n.

Aphthargelia rumbleboredomia  sp. n.

Apterous vivipara. Appearance in life: Base color of the body pale milky yellowish; venter of thorax and abdomen pale; head black, red or orange, often paler than prothorax, which may be black or reddish, dorsum of meso- and metathorax more or less black; front of abdominal dorsum with broad white wax band broken in middle by black; abdominal terga II –IV black, V mostly pale with a white wax spot in middle; siphunculi black, with narrow white wax band between them and with dark red internal pigment surrounding their bases; abdominal terga VII, VIII, and cauda dusted lightly with white wax; antennae with segments II –V mostly white, with dark apices, segments I and VI entirely dark; legs mostly pale, coxae and trochanters pale to very light grey with apex of femora and tibiae and entire tarsi grey. Within a sample of apterae, variation in color development ( Fig. 1View FIGURE 1) is probably based on specimen age.

Slide mounted, 22 specimens measured [holotype in brackets]: Body length 1.90–2.32 [2.27]. Antennae with segment I slightly scabrous medially and ventrally on apical ½, a.s. II with a few small imbrications ventrally on apical ½; a.s. III 0.38–0.68 [0.65] long; IV 0.20–0.55 [0.48] long, V 0.21–0.41 [0.39] long, VIa 0.09–0.13 [0.11] long, VIb 0.36–0.71 [0.68] long. Head variably pigmented, often dusky, slightly paler than prothorax. Setae on antennal tubercles less than basal width of a.s. III; antennal tubercles moderately prominent, distinctly exceeding middle of frons, ventral surface with spinules and imbrications, dorsum with a few spinules apically; dorsal surface of head smooth except with transverse wrinkles posteriorly, ventral surface of head capsule lightly wrinkled throughout. Rostrum extending almost to hind coxae, u.r.s. 0.12–0.14 [0.13] long, with 4–6 [5] accessory setae, and 0.77–0.92 [0.81] times as long as metatarsal II. Dorsum of thorax with extensive pigmented plates that are mostly covered in reticulate sculpturing, prothorax often paler than meso- and metathorax. Prothorax with lateral tubercles, sometimes very large and/or split into two separate tubercles. Metafemur 0.52–0.85 [0.82] long, with light ornamentation over apical ½ on dorsal and anterior surface composed of small spinulate imbrications; metatibia 0.92–1.58 [1.51] long, subapical dorsal setae 0.04–0.06 [0.05] long and 1.0– 1.7 [1.2] times basal width a.s. III; tarsal segments I with 3 setae; metatarsus 0.13–0.17 [0.16] long, imbricated uniformly, imbrications on apical ½ often with faint spinules. Abdominal dorsum with large dark reticulated shield on terga III –V, connected by a narrow spinal band to dark shield on thorax ( Figs. 1View FIGURE 1, 2View FIGURE 2 – 7); separate, small intersegmental muscle attachment plates evident on some segments. Strong lateral tubercles present on segments II –V and immediately anterior to siphunculi. Siphunculi dark, 0.15–0.20 [0.20] long, imbricated, often slightly swollen. Abdominal tergum VIII with 3–7 [4] setae, longest 0.05–0.07 [0.07] long and 1.5–2.1 [1.9] times basal width a.s. III. Genital plate with 1–7 [4] discal setae in addition 2 primary setae. Cauda 0.15–0.21 [0.20] long, more or less triangular, with 7–17 [14] setae (rarely less than 10).

Alate vivipara. Appearance in life: most of body, legs, and antennae rather dark, base color reddish when it is apparent.

Slide mounted, 20 specimens measured: Body length 1.95–2.57. Antennae with segment I scabrous medially and with spinules ventrally over ½ to all of surface, dorsal surface more or less smooth; a.s. II with small imbrications ventrally over ½ or more of surface; a.s. III 0.56–0.73 long with 55–77 sensoria; IV 0.45–0.60 long with 25–61 sensoria; V 0.34–0.46 long with 0–15 secondary sensoria; VIa 0.11–0.15 long, VIb 0.66–0.85 long. Setae on antennal tubercles less than 0.5 times basal width of a.s. III; antennal tubercles moderately prominent, distinctly exceeding median ocellus, ventral surface with spinules and imbrications, dorsum with a few spinules apically; dorsal surface of head smooth except with transverse wrinkles posteriorly, ventral surface of head capsule lightly wrinkled throughout. Rostrum extending to middle of mesothorax, u.r.s. 0.12–0.14 long, with 4–7 accessory setae, and 0.76–0.87 times as long as metatarsal II. Prothorax with lateral tubercles, sometimes very large and/or split into two separate tubercles, rarely with a faint spinal tubercle. Metafemur 0.65–0.86 long, with light ornamentation over apical ½ on dorsum, almost full length of anterior surface, and posterior part very near apex composed of small spinulate imbrications; metatibia 1.41–1.71 long, subapical dorsal setae 0.03–0.04 long and 0.76–1.13 times basal width a.s. III; tarsal segments I with 3 setae; metatarsus 0.15–0.18 long, imbricated uniformly, imbrications on apical ½ often with faint spinules. Wings with normal Aphidinae  venation. Abdominal tergum with dark lateral sclerites, intersegmental muscle attachment plates, and various blotches or bands on tergites II –IV, with transverse band between siphunculi not or only narrowly connected to sclerites surrounding bases of siphunculi and thinner than the bands/blotches on tergites II –IV, tergites VII and VIII with complete transverse bands ( Fig. 3View FIGURE 2 – 7). Strong lateral tubercles present on segments II –V and immediately anterior to siphunculi. Siphunculi dark, 0.11–0.20 long, imbricated, often slightly swollen. Abdominal tergum VIII with 3–9 setae, longest 0.03–0.07 long and 0.69–1.75 times basal width a.s. III. Genital plate with 2–11 discal setae in addition 2 primary setae. Cauda 0.16–0.22 long, more or less triangular, with 13–19 setae.

Ovipara. Appearance in life: base body color dark red to very dark red and nearly black, wax markings essentially as in aptera, other pigmentation more or less as in aptera entire hind tibia grey, and apex of a.s. III not or only slightly darkened.

Slide mounted, 10 specimens measured: Body length 1.13–1.53. Antennal segment I with a few spinules/ imbrications medially and ventrally on apical ½; a.s. II with one to a few small imbrications ventrally on apical ½; a.s. III 0.23–0.31 long; IV 0.16–0.20 long, V 0.17–0.20 long, VIa 0.07–0.09 long, VIb 0.26–0.31 long. Head pale to brown. Setae on antennal tubercles less than basal width of a.s. III; antennal tubercles moderately prominent, distinctly exceeding middle of frons, ventral surface with spinules and imbrications, dorsum with a few spinules apically; dorsal surface of head smooth except with transverse wrinkles posteriorly, ventral surface of head capsule lightly wrinkled throughout, with wrinkles between antennal tubercles and clypeus with small spinules. Rostrum extending almost to hind coxae, u.r.s. 0.08–0.11 long, with 4–5 accessory setae, and 0.81 –1.00 times as long as metatarsal II. Dorsum of thorax membranous, unpigmented, with faint reticulate sculpturing. Prothorax with large lateral tubercles. Metafemur 0.26–0.37 long, with light ornamentation over apical 3 / 4 on dorsal and anterior surface composed of small spinulate imbrications; metatibia swollen, 0.52–0.62 long, with numerous scent plaques covering entire length except extreme base and apex, subapical dorsal setae 0.03–0.05 long and 1.4–1.7 times basal width a.s. III; tarsal segments I with 3 setae; metatarsus 0.10–0.12 long, imbricated more or less uniformly, some imbrications with faint spinules. Abdominal dorsum unpigmented and membranous except very small intersegmental muscle attachment plates ( Fig. 4View FIGURE 2 – 7), much of tergites II –V with faint reticulate sculpturing. Strong lateral tubercles present on segments II –V and immediately anterior to siphunculi. Siphunculi dark, 0.08–0.10 long, imbricated, often slightly swollen. Abdominal tergum VIII with 11–19 setae, longest 0.05–0.06 long and 1.8–2.3 times basal width a.s. III. Genital plate with 5–18 discal setae in addition 2 primary setae. Cauda 0.10–0.13 long, less elongate than in aptera, with 10–19 setae.

Alate male. No male specimens of Aphthargelia  have been confirmed as A. rumbleboredomia  because they have not been unequivocally associated with their mothers. There are no clear morphological distinctions that separate all the male specimens from across the continent. Fourteen male specimens in the author’s collection may be this species and will be filed with it.

Etymology. The species name is in honor of one of my collecting partners, Rumble the dog, who often got bored with my frequent stops and went back to camp part way through our morning walks.

Biology and distribution. This species was first discovered by the author living on Aconogonon phytolaccifolium  . This plant is a large herbaceous perennial herb (stems up to 2 m long) in the mountains from Alaska to California, Montana, and Nevada (Hitchcock and Cronquist, 1978)  . It inhabits rocky meadows, talus slopes, and mountain ridges. In practice, it is often found growing along primitive roads, which seem to provide suitable habitat. Following the initial find of A. rumbleboredomia  on roadside A. phytolaccifolium  , it was found several other times in similar mountain habitats of northern Idaho. Searching in the late fall found no specimens on Aconogonon  , and because Symphoricarpos  was in the area, host alternation was suspected. In July of 2011 several new colonies were found on lower leaves of A. phytolaccifolium  near Crystal Lake, Idaho. The alate viviparae founders of these colonies were still present, several with signs of age, such as broken wings and accumulated dust. These features are indicative of aphid colonies started by migrant females. Finally, in September of 2012 migrant females were found colonizing Symphoricarpos  and producing oviparae. Both locations where re-migrating alatae were found on Symphoricarpos  are near known populations of Aconogonon  .

Andersen (1991) studied this species on Aconogonon davisiae  (as Polygonum newberryi  ) on Mount St. Helens starting four years after it erupted in 1980. His work looked at the interactions between A. rumbleboredomia  and the ant Formica fusca  , concluding that the aphid performed better in the absence of ants, and that the ants were primarily acting as predators.

On Aconogonon  , this species is often found on the lower to middle leaves, and in mixed assemblages with Capitophorus essigi Hille Ris Lambers. 

So far A. rumbleboredomia  has been collected in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, but likely occurs in other states and Canadian provinces where its hosts grow in reasonable proximity.

Type material and material examined (all collected by the author except where noted). Holotype slide, AJ 5254, USA, Idaho, Shoshone Co., Crater Peak, F.R. 301, ex Aconogonon phytolaccifolium  , 3 X 2011 (middle of the 3 specimens is holotype, slide marked on top of each label with red ink, other 2 specimens on slide are paratypes), deposited in the USNM.

Paratypes (depositories other than the author’s collection so noted): AJ 4320 (3 apt.), AJ 4321 (3 apt.), AJ 4322 (3 apt.), AJ 4323 (3 apt.), AJ 4324 (3 apt.), USA, Idaho, Shoshone Co., St. Joe Baldy, Polygonum phytolaccifolium  , 8 viii 2010; AJ 4485 (4 apt.), AJ 4486 (4 apt.), USA, Idaho, Adams Co., Granite Mts., Fisher Creek, ex Polygonum phytolaccifolium  , 5 ix 2010; AJ 4923 (2 apt., 2 al.), AJ 4924 (2 apt., 2 al.), AJ 4925 (2 apt., 2 al. – CNC), USA, Idaho, Benewah Co., St. Joe Baldy, Crystal Lake Trail, ex Polygonum phytolaccifolium  , 16 vii 2011; AJ 5299 (3 apt., 1 al.), USA, Idaho, Shoshone Co., Shefoot Mt., ex Polygonum phytolaccifolium  , 3 ix 2011; AJ 5320 (2 apt., 1 al. – BMNH), AJ 5321 (4 apt.), AJ 5322 (3 apt.), USA, Idaho, Benewah Co., Crystal Lake Trail, St. Joe Baldy area, ex Polygonum phytolaccifolium  , 11 vii 2011; AJ 5952 (3 al.), AJ 5953 (4 al.), USA, Oregon, Union Co., Eagle Caps Wilderness, Eagle Creek, ex Symphoricarpos  , 2 ix 2012; AJ 6151 (1 ov. – USNM), AJ 6152 (8 ov.), AJ 6153 (9 ov.), AJ 6154 (1 al.), AJ 6155 (1 al.), AJ 6161 (4 al. – USNM), AJ 6166 (3 al.), AJ 6167 (4 al.), USA, Idaho, Adams Co., near Brundage Mt., ex Symphoricarpos  , 22 ix 2012; AJ 6183 (1 ov. – CNC), AJ 6185 (2 al.), AJ 6186 (3 al.), USA, Idaho, Adams Co., 10 miles N. McCall, ex Symphoricarpos  , 19 ix 2012.

Other material examined: A sample composed of seven slides, 6 apterae and 1 alata, from the study by Andersen (1991) were loaned by Susan Halbert, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, collected from USA, Washington, Mount St. Helens, Skamania Co., Pine Cr. Mud Flow, ex Polygonum newberryi  , 23 viii 1984, M.C. Andersen, coll. One aptera from this same collection was also loaned by the INHS.

Comments. This new species looks very different from A. symphoricarpi  when alive due to striking color differences: in contrast to the red and orange colors of A. rumbleboredomia  , A. symphoricarpi  is dark blue to black. When cleared and preserved on slides the two species are extremely similar. In mounted apterae the chief distinguishing character is the relatively reduced dorsal pigmentation in A. rumbleboredomia  ( Figs. 1View FIGURE 1, 2View FIGURE 2 – 7), which is obvious and consistent. Also, the apterae have coxae nearly pale as compared to darker coxae in A. symphoricarpi  . Other characters commonly used in aphid taxonomy such as length of the u.r.s. vs. metatarsal II, relative lengths of antennal segments, lengths of setae on various body parts, etc. all overlap in the two species. The alatae are exceptionally similar, but once again the dorsal pigmentation can be used to separate most specimens: in A. rumbleboredomia  the horizontal pigmented band on the abdomen between the siphunculi usually does not connect to the sclerites surrounding the bases of the siphunculi and is also thinner than in A. symphoricarpi  ( Fig. 3View FIGURE 2 – 7). The oviparae are also similar, but the relative size of the intersegmental muscle attachment plates appears to be diagnostic in this morph ( Fig. 4View FIGURE 2 – 7). The overall appearance of the ovipara in life is similar to the aptera, but the dark color of the thorax and abdomen is entirely internal pigment and not related to dark dorsal sclerites as in the aptera.