Rhizonemella

Ghaderi, Reza, 2019, An outline on distribution and hosts of the cystoid nematodes of Ataloderinae Wouts, 1973 and Meloidoderinae Golden, 1971, Zootaxa 4664 (3), pp. 339-350: 343

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4664.3.2

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:BA95280D-BB4E-4661-882E-B9DA4A67BD14

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/039E6C35-472C-7B30-FF75-FBB8FC0F7D61

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Rhizonemella
status

 

Rhizonemella  (Cid del Prado Vera, Lownsbery & Maggenti, 1983) Andrássy, 2007

Because the name of Rhizonema Clark, 1877  was already existed in Coelomata, Andrássy (2007) used the name of Rhizonemella  for this nematode. The only valid representative of this genus, R. sequoiae  , was described from coastal redwood ( Sequoia sempervirens (Lamb. Ex D. Don) Endl.  , Cupressaceae  ) in Lagunitas Lake, Marin County, CA, USA (Cid del Prado Vera et al. 1983). These authors reported that at the same location mature females were also found in smaller numbers on tanbark oak ( Lithocarpus densiflorus (Hook. & Arn.) Reh.  , Fagaceae  ), California bay ( Umbellularia californica (Hook. & Arn.) Nutt.  , Lauraceae  ), and madrone ( Arbutus menziesii Pursh  , Ericaceae  ). Specimens of R. sequoiae  were collected from the type host and locality and used for morphological and biological studies (Cid del Prado Vera & Lownsbery 1984, Cid del Prado Vera et al.,1984, Cliff & Baldwin 1985, Othman & Baldwin 1986). Development to maturity was documented in species of Libocedrus  and Sequoiadendron  ( Cupressaceae  ), Pseudotsuga  ( Pinaceae  ), Acer  ( Sapindaceae  ) and Alnus  ( Betulaceae  ) (Cid del Prado Vera & Lownsbery 1984). Subbotin et al. (2017) pointed out that more species appear to exist in the USA than elsewhere, and their molecular analysis revealed a putative new species, Rhizonemella  sp. A, parasitizing an unknown tree located a few hundred metres from the type locality. Furthermore, two additional putative new species of Rhizonemella  (sp. B and sp. C) were also present in northern California ( Subbotin et al. 2017).