Stigmella sinuosa Remeikis & Stonis,

Stonis, Jonas R. & Remeikis, Andrius, 2016, Southern Andean Stigmella sinuosa complex (Lepidoptera, Nepticulidae): unraveling problematic taxonomy with a pictorial key of adults?, Zootaxa 4136 (2), pp. 309-322: 310-311

publication ID

http://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4136.2.3

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:A8645A57-C7FC-4F05-8ED5-5F0EA42A1276

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03A80219-621B-9A10-FF2D-9AAA47B8F276

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Stigmella sinuosa Remeikis & Stonis
status

sp. nov.

Stigmella sinuosa Remeikis & Stonis  , sp. nov.

( Figs 1–6View FIGURES 1 – 6, 11View FIGURE 11, 12View FIGURE 12, 23View FIGURE 23)

Type material (7 Ƌ). Holotype Ƌ: ARGENTINA, Río Negro, S. C. de Bariloche, Colonia Suiza, elevation ca. 800 m, 19.x. 1981, Nielsen & Karsholt, genitalia slide no. RA 508 ( ZMUC). Paratypes (6 Ƌ): 4 Ƌ, same locality as holotype, 12.x – 7.xi. 1981, Nielsen & Karsholt, genitalia slide nos RA 323, RA 527, RA 627, RA 704; 1 Ƌ, same locality as holotype, elevation ca. 810 m, 29.xi. 1978, Mision Cientifica Danesa, genitalia slide no. RA 362; 1 Ƌ, Neuquen, San Martin de los Andes, elevation ca. 640 m, 4.x. 1981, Nielsen & Karsholt, genitalia slide no. RA 520 ( ZMUC).

Other examined material (not included into the type series, 6 Ƌ): 4 Ƌ, ARGENTINA, Río Negro, S. C. de Bariloche, Colonia Suiza, elevation ca. 800 m, 17.x – 11.xi. 1981, Nielsen & Karsholt, genitalia slide nos RA 356, RA 526, RA 628 ( ZMUC); 1 Ƌ same locality, elevation ca. 810 m, 9.xii. 1978, Mision Cientifica Danesa, genitalia slide no. RA 330 ( ZMUC); 1 Ƌ, Neuquen, San Martin de los Andes, elevation ca. 640 m, 7–15.xi. 1981, Nielsen & Karsholt ( ZMUC).

Diagnosis. S. sinuosa  belongs to the Stigmella salicis  group (see Remarks). From the most similar S. mevia  it differs in the very pale frontal tuft and paler antenna; in contrast to S. mevia  , the forewing is usually coarsely speckled and the golden lustre of forewing is weak or absent. In the male genitalia, it differs from S. mevia  in the simple-shaped uncus (see fig. 12) and specific shape of cornuti (with a large sinuous cornutus) (see fig. 11).

Male ( Figs 1View FIGURES 1 – 6, 11View FIGURE 11). Forewing length 3.0–3.1 mm; wingspan 6.5–6.7 mm. Head: palpi cream white; frontal tuft white to cream; collar and scape cream white, glossy; antenna distinctly longer than half the length of forewing; flagellum with 40 segments, pale, brownish on upper side, brownish cream on underside. Thorax and tegula pale grey-brown. Forewing: basal two thirds grey to golden grey, coarsely speckled with pale brown and dark brown scales with some golden gloss (only a very few with purple iridescence); dark brown scales prevail and are more distinct in the wide area before the forewing fascia; fascia silvery shiny, distinctly postmedian or sub-apical, oblique, ill-defined in the holotype, narrowed at tornus; sometimes apex of forewing with some silvery shiny scales forming small irregular apical spots in between dark brown scales; if fascia absent, silvery shiny scales form two subapical spots along costal margin and on tornus; terminal and tornal fringe pale grey or, at certain angle of view, white with silvery gloss; underside of forewing pale brown, with no spots or androconia. Hindwing pale, pale greybrown or, at certain angle of view, white on upper side and underside, with no androconia; fringe cream, at certain angle of view pale brown. Legs cream to brownish cream, with some grey to grey-brown scales on upper side. Abdomen grey on upper side and underside; anal tufts short, cream; genital plates cream.

Female. Unknown.

Male genitalia ( Figs 2–6View FIGURES 1 – 6, 11View FIGURE 11, 12View FIGURE 12). Capsule longer (300–340 mm) than wide (235–240 mm). Vinculum with short triangular lateral lobes; anterior excavation between lobes shallow and wide; ventral plate long. Uncus bilobed, without or with a weakly visible second pair of tiny lateral processes ( Figs 3, 6View FIGURES 1 – 6, 12View FIGURE 12). Gnathos with two thickened caudal processes ( Figs 3View FIGURES 1 – 6, 12View FIGURE 12). Valva ( Figs 2, 3, 6View FIGURES 1 – 6, 12View FIGURE 12) 170–190 mm long, with wide inner lobe and two slender apical processes which can be weakly visible in genitalia mounts; transtilla with short transverse bar but no sublateral processes ( Figs 3View FIGURES 1 – 6, 12View FIGURE 12). Juxta membranous, indistinct, triangularly shaped. Phallus ( Figs 4, 5View FIGURES 1 – 6, 11View FIGURE 11) 200– 205 mm long, 105–130 m wide; vesica with 8 to 10 (usually 9) various horn-like cornuti; one of the largest cornuti is distinctly sinuous ( Figs 4View FIGURES 1 – 6, 11View FIGURE 11).

Bionomics. Host-plant: unknown. Adults fly in October –early December.

Distribution. Known mostly from the western (mountainous) Argentina at elevations about 640–800 m ( Fig. 23View FIGURE 23).

Etymology. The species name is derived from Latin sinuosus (curving, twisting, serpentine) referring to the large sinuous cornutus in the male genitalia.

Remarks. The Stigmella salicis  group (= S. fuscotibiella  group) was well defined in a few publications dealing with the European ( Johansson et al. 1990), Asian ( Puplesis 1994), and North American fauna ( Newton & Wilkinson 1982). The consequent inclusion of some South American species into the S. salicis  group ( Puplesis & Robinson 2000; Puplesis et al. 2002, with subsequent acceptance to the word catalogue (Diškus & Stonis 2003), has significantly extended not only the geographical range but also made the concept of this group less defined. Currently, on the basis of new and abundant material collected in South America, an updated characterization of the S. salicis  group is in progress (Stonis et al. in prep.). Therefore, in the present paper, we intentionally avoid providing a more detail characterization of the S. salicis  group than it was published earlier, and refrain from discussions on taxonomic diversity, distribution, host-plant preferences and origin of the species group until our detail analysis is finished.

ZMUC

Zoological Museum, University of Copenhagen