Tylolaimophorus typicus de Man, 1880

Ghaderi, Reza, Asghari, Ramezan & Eskandari, Ali, 2020, Systematics of the genus Tylolaimophorus de Man, 1880 (Nematoda Diphtherophoridae), with description of T. minor (Thorne, 1939) Goodey, 1963 from Iran, Zootaxa 4755 (2), pp. 322-340 : 335

publication ID

https://doi.org/ 10.11646/zootaxa.4755.2.7

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:321C36EA-3A65-4C43-80AE-5D2C536D2DF9

persistent identifier

https://treatment.plazi.org/id/03AB87FD-5866-F335-FF31-9264FA77FEF5

treatment provided by

Carolina

scientific name

Tylolaimophorus typicus de Man, 1880
status

 

Tylolaimophorus typicus de Man, 1880  

After de Man (1880). After Brzeski (1994). After Andrássy (2009). MEASUREMENTS

Holotype female: L = 0.8 mm; a = 25; b = 5.5; c = 30.

Neotype female: L = 0.74 mm; a = 22; b = 5.5; spear = 11 µm; pharynx = 136 µm; tail = 22 µm; c = 34; c’ = 0.8; V = 55.

35 females: L = 0.55-1.06 mm; a = 18-28; b = 4.4-7.6; spear = 10-13 µm; pharynx = 105-144 µm; tail = 19-35 µm; c = 23-35; c’ = 0.8-1.2; V = 48-58.

7 males: L = 0.55-0.80 mm; a = 19-25; b = 4.1-5.3; spear = 10-13 µm; pharynx = 116-157 µm; tail = 23-36 µm; c = 21-28; c’ = 0.9-1.4; spicules = 24-29 µm; gubernaculum = 7-10 µm.

?

females: L = 0.7-1.0 mm; a = 20-28; b = 5.0-7.2; spear = 10-13 µm; pharynx = 110- 140 µm; tail = 23-33 µm; c = 26-35; c’ = 0.8-1.2; V = 50-56.

? males: L = 0.6-0.8 mm; a = 20-25; b = 5.0-5.8; c = 22-28; c’ = 1.0-1.4; spicules = 24-28 µm.

DESCRIPTION

Female. Relaxed specimens arcuate ventrad to C-shaped. Cuticle about 1-1.5 µm thick, distinctly striated. Pores irregularly distributed over the entire body, very indistinct. Lip region truncated, narrower than the adjacent body part, 11-12 µm wide; not separated by depression, although fairly large outer labial papillae may suggest that lip region is offset. Amphids large, oval; their opening 4-5 µm wide, 33-45 % of lip region width. Pharynx with fairly slight median swelling. Body width at pharyngo-intestinal junction 2.1-3.2 lip region widths. Vagina 10-13 µm, rectum 8-11 µm long, about one-third of anal body width. Post-anal intestinal sac extending into the tail to varying degrees; the sac may or may not have a lumen. Tail plump, with a broadly rounded terminus.

Male. With narrow and slightly arcuate spicules, proximally with a straight process. Ventromedian supplements widely spaced, a few close to cloaca distinct but the others very difficult to observe, apparently reaching close to head region of spicules. However, Andrássy (2009) noted two to four supplements in males. In some males, three ventromedian neck supplements or papillae may be observed.

DIAGNOSIS AND RELATIONSHIPS

Tylolaimophorus typicus   appears most similar to T. cylindricus   but differs by having shorter and straighter spicules (24-29 vs 40 µm). J. B. Goodey (1963) noted that T. typicus   has no good description or figures, but the appearance of the lip region, spear and guiding apparatus, minute projections round the vestibule entrance, the shape of amphid apertures, and extent of intestine into the tail region suggest it is congeneric with species of Triplonchium   . Brzeski (1994) redescribed this species and designated a neotype from a population collected in the soil of a birch-oak forest in the Netherlands. T. pannonicus   was described on the basis of single male and single juvenile specimens. Brzeski (1994) stated that this male does not differ from males found in populations of T. typicus   where both females and males were found. Consequently, he considered T. pannonicus   as a junior synonym of T. typicus   .

DISTRIBUTION

Described from meadows in the Netherlands ( de Man 1880). Also recovered in forests of Tippecanoe County, Indiana, USA ( Johnson et al. 1972). Reported from a deciduous forest in Orléans, France ( Arpin & Ponge 1986, Arpin et al. 1995), from two spruce forests on Plechy peak and Trojmezi, Czech Republic ( Hánĕl 1999), and, from Slovakia, in the forests of the Vihorlat Protected Landscape Area ( Hánĕl & Čerevková 2010). Renker et al. (2003) considered this nematode species as a host for the fungus Malassezia restricta   , a mammal pathogen in the forest soils of Germany. Andrássy (2009) noted that this species has been observed in several European countries: The Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, Poland, Austria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Romania, France and Lithuania. Another population was reported in association with forest trees ( Quercus frainetto Ten.   ) in Rhodopes, Bulgaria ( Peneva et al. 2011).

V

Royal British Columbia Museum - Herbarium