Kalliapseudes messingi, Drumm, David T., 2007

Drumm, David T., 2007, Two new species of Tanaidacea of the genus Kalliapseudes Stebbing, 1910 (Crustacea: Apseudomorpha: Kalliapseudidae) from Australia, Zootaxa 1441, pp. 1-19: 10-17

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.5281/zenodo.176001

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:2A96EFBE-5548-4EC6-8522-62CA6EC68013

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5679657

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03B3072A-F65E-FFF7-FF3E-88BFFB2C1174

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Kalliapseudes messingi
status

new species

Kalliapseudes messingi   , new species

Figs. 7–12 View FIGURE 7 View FIGURE 8 View FIGURE 9 View FIGURE 10 View FIGURE 11 View FIGURE 12

Material Examined. Holotype: preparatory female (partly dissected, torn body), AM P 74740 View Materials , Northwest Shelf, Western Australia, 41m depth, 19 ° 29.2 'S, 118 ° 52.5 'E, station no. SO 3-83 -B8, 28 June 1983. Allotype: adult male (partly dissected), AM P 74741 View Materials , Northwest Shelf, Western Australia, 41m depth, 19 ° 56.4 'S, 117 ° 53.9 'E, station no. SO 5-83 -B2, 26 Oct 1983. Paratype: one subadult male, AM P 74742 View Materials , same locality and collection date as allotype.

Description. Preparatory female. Body (measurements of most segments unable to be made owing to torn body).

Carapace ( Fig. 7 View FIGURE 7 A). Broader than long, one pair of mid-lateral setae; rostrum round.

Pereonites ( Fig. 7 View FIGURE 7 A). Pereonites 4 and 5 longer than 1 –3, 6 and pereonites 1 and 6 shorter than 2–5, all rounded laterally; one pair of simple setae on anterior corners; hyposphaenia present on all pereonites.

Pleon. Pleonites subequal; rounded epimera, with several plumose setae; hyposphaenia present on all pleonites. Pleotelson ( Fig. 7 View FIGURE 7 B) more than ½ length of combined length of pleonites 1–5, rounded, with several lateral simple setae and two pairs of simple setae on dorsal surface.

Antennule ( Fig. 7 View FIGURE 7 C). First article about 2.5 times as long as second and third articles combined; inner flagellum with four articles; outer flagellum with ten articles, with one aesthetasc each on articles 4, 5, 6, and 8.

Antennae ( Fig. 7 View FIGURE 7 D). First article with medial extension bearing four plumose setae. Second article with minute scales on dorsal surface. Squama with five long simple setae. Distal (4 th) peduncle article longer than flagellum, with double row of plumose setae. Flagellum with six articles.

Labrum ( Fig. 7 View FIGURE 7 E). Rounded, with apex provided with short spinules.

Mandibles. Right mandible with incisor process having two denticles. Left mandible ( Fig. 7 View FIGURE 7 F) with incisor process having about ten denticles; lacinia mobilis broken off. Both mandibles with setal row of five serrate spiniform setae. Mandibular palp uniarticulate with row of long plumose setae and terminating in a sharp spiniform seta. Molar processes broken off.

Labium ( Fig. 7 View FIGURE 7 G). Palp with long hairs on margins; ending in an acuminate inner tip.

Maxillule ( Fig. 7 View FIGURE 7 H). Inner endite bearing four terminally setulate setae. Outer endite with eleven distal spines and two subterminal setae and with long hairs on outer face.

Maxilla ( Fig. 8 View FIGURE 8 A). Inner lobe of fixed endite with posterior row of four serrate setae. Outer lobe of fixed endite ( Fig. 8 View FIGURE 8 B) with four multi-toothed spiniform setae on inner half and several serrate and simple setae on outer half. Inner lobe of moveable endite with spiniform setae terminating in three cusps. Outer lobe of moveable endite with three serrate and two plumodenticulate setae. Outer margin with dense rows of long hairs and inner margin spinulate.

Maxilliped ( Fig. 8 View FIGURE 8 C). Basal article fringed with plumose setae along outer margin. First article of palp with several long, simple setae. Last three articles of palp with double row of long plumose setae on inner margin of. Endite with numerous long hairs on lateral margins and with plumose setae on distal margin, and with two coupling hooks.

Cheliped ( Figs. 8 View FIGURE 8 D, E). Basis with one ventral spiniform seta and simple setae on ventrodistal corner. Merus longer than broad, with three simple setae on ventrodistal corner. Carpus about four times as long as broad, with double row of long, plumose setae and two short simple setae on dorsodistal corner. Propodus with diagonal row of long, plumose setae; fixed finger two-thirds or more length of dactylus, with several simple setae just proximal to distal spine; cutting edge with numerous spinules; palm with one simple seta. Dactylus with three simple setae midway on inner surface; cutting edge with several spinules increasing in length distally, interspersed with one or two round protuberances; claw present. Exopodite (broken off) present, with three plumose setae.

Pereopod 1 ( Figs. 8 View FIGURE 8 F, 9 A). Basis about 2.2 times as long as broad, with one spiniform and one simple seta on ventrodistal margin. Ischium naked. Merus longer than broad, about as broad as basis, with one dorsal and one ventral spiniform seta and with several simple setae on ventral margin. Carpus about one-third length of merus, with two ventrodistal and one dorsodistal serrate spiniform setae. Propodus shorter than carpus, with five ventral and two dorsal serrate spiniform setae. Dactylus represented by a sensory organ, about as long as propodus, with numerous long, terminal sensory setae and with one short simple seta on inner surface; unguis absent. Exopodite (broken off, Fig. 8 View FIGURE 8 G) present, with three plumose setae.

Pereopod 2 ( Fig. 9 View FIGURE 9 B). Basis more than three times as long as broad, with one long simple seta on outer surface and one simple seta on ventrodistal margin. Ischium with one long and one short simple seta on ventrodistal margin. Merus about same length as carpus, with one serrate spiniform seta. Carpus about 1.5 times as long as broad, with seven serrate spiniform setae. Propodus about one-third length of basis, with nine serrate spiniform setae. Dactylus shorter than basis; sensory organ present near base, with eight aesthetascs; with short needle-like tip; unguis fused with dactylus.

Pereopod 3 ( Fig. 9 View FIGURE 9 C). Similar to pereopod 2. Carpus with nine serrate spiniform setae. Propodus with ten serrate spiniform setae.

Pereopod 4 ( Fig. 9 View FIGURE 9 D). Basis about 2.4 times as long as broad, with a few distal simple setae. Ischium with two simple setae. Merus subequal to carpus, with one spiniform seta and two simple setae distally. Carpus with eleven serrate spiniform setae. Propodus with 16 serrate spiniform setae increasing in length distally and terminally with several short, bipinnate setae. Dactylus shorter than propodus, with distal tuft of aesthetascs, and with two short simple setae midway (these setae are illustrated in detail in fig. 12 C); unguis absent.

Pereopod 5 ( Fig. 9 View FIGURE 9 E). Similar to pereopod 4. Basis narrower than pereopod 4, about 2.3 times as long as broad. Merus with four spiniform setae. Carpus with 14 serrate spiniform setae. Propodus lacking terminal Pereopod 6 ( Fig. 10 View FIGURE 10 A). Basis with five plumose setae on dorsal margin and with four plumose and three simple setae on ventral margin. Ischium with several simple setae on ventral margin. Merus with several simple setae on ventral margin. Carpus with three plumose setae on dorsal margin and several simple setae on ventral margin. Propodus with five long spiniform setae and 26 short bipinnate setae. Dactylus longer than propodus but shorter than basis, with a proximal incomplete line of fusion, and with one terminal seta and a tuft of four subterminal setae; unguis small.

Pleopods ( Fig. 10 View FIGURE 10 B). Basal article with four dorsal plumose setae, ventral margin naked. Exopodite with 20 plumose setae. Endopodite with 25 plumose setae.

Uropods ( Fig. 10 View FIGURE 10 C). Basal article with one simple outer distal seta. Exopodite with two articles, last article with four simple setae. Endopodite multiarticulated (exact number difficult to determine due to incomplete fusion in some of the articles).

Adult male (allotype). Similar to female but with the following differences. Body ( Fig. 11 View FIGURE 11 A) length approximately 5 mm, five times as long as broad.

Antennule ( Fig. 11 View FIGURE 11 B). Last two peduncle articles very short (length to width ratio, 1: 3); inner flagellum with five articles; outer flagellum with eleven articles, with most of the articles with numerous aesthetascs.

Antenna ( Fig. 11 View FIGURE 11 C). First article with medial extension bearing three plumose setae. Peduncle with five articles.

Cheliped ( Figs. 11 View FIGURE 11 D, E). Propodus more robust than that of female, about 1.2 times as long as broad (not including fixed finger), with a setal row increasing in length distally adjacent to dactylus attachment; cutting edge with two large teeth. Dactylus cutting edge with one medial triangular tooth, one spinule just anterior to tooth, and a few short spinules posterior to tooth.

Pereopod 4 ( Fig. 12 View FIGURE 12 A). Merus with three serrate spiniform setae. Carpus with 15 serrate spiniform setae (seven outer and eight inner).

Pereopod 5 ( Figs. 12 View FIGURE 12 B, C). Merus with three serrate spiniform setae. Carpus with 13 serrate spiniform setae (six outer and seven inner).

Pereopod 6 ( Fig. 12 View FIGURE 12 D). More slender than other pereopods. Basis with three plumose setae on ventral margin. Merus with three plumose setae on dorsal margin. Carpus with four plumose setae on dorsal margin. Dactylus without tuft of subterminal setae.

Etymology. Named for Dr. Charles Messing, professor and mentor, who introduced the author to research in marine biology and to the study of Tanaidacea   .

Remarks. Kalliapseudes messingi   , n. sp. is the first member of the genus to be reported from the northwest continental shelf of Australia and is distinguished from all other congeners by (1) the presence of two small medial setae ( Fig. 12 View FIGURE 12 C) on the dactylus of pereopods 4 and 5, (2) the female having a tuft of sensory setae subterminally on the dactylus of pereopod 6, and (3) having three plumose setae on the cheliped and pereopod 1 exopodite. Only one sixth pereopod remained intact on the adult male allotype and subadult male paratype and they did not have the subterminal tuft of sensory setae on the dactylus. It is not known whether this structure was lost or if it represents a sexually dimorphic character. Until further specimens can be studied, it is tentatively placed in K. messingi   .

The antennal peduncles on the females of K. longisetosus   and K. messingi   appear to be composed of four articles; whereas, antennal peduncles on the males of these two species appear to have five articles. Shiino (1966) also recognized this phenomenon in K. tomiokaensis   . The presence of a four or five-articulated peduncle has often been used as a diagnostic feature for distinguishing individual species within the Kalliapseudidae   ( Guţu, 1996; 2001). I therefore recommend that this character be interpreted with caution and that in future taxonomic and systematic studies on this family the antennae of both males and females be carefully examined to determine the number of articles present.

Table 1 View TABLE 1 lists the distribution of all the known members of the genus Kalliapseudes   . A key for the separation of the known kalliapseudid genera and species from Australian waters is presented here.