Sinoxylon unidentatum,

Sittichaya, Wisut, Beaver, Roger, Liu, Lan-Yu & Ngampongsai, Aran, 2009, An illustrated key to powder post beetles (Coleoptera, Bostrichidae) associated with rubberwood in Thailand, with new records and a checklist of species found in Southern Thailand, ZooKeys 26 (26), pp. 33-51: 41-42

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.3897/zookeys.26.88

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3790428

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03B687A2-FFE8-FFD6-1992-283AFD3BF976

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Sinoxylon unidentatum
status

 

Sinoxylon unidentatum  (F.) †*

Fig. 9b, eView Figure 9

Distribution. An Oriental species that has become almost cosmopolitan as a result of transport by man in infested timber. Th e species has usually been recorded under the name of its synonym, Sinoxylon conigerum Gerstaecker  ( Borowski and Węgrzynowicz 2007). Recorded in Th ailand from the provinces: Chiangmai, Chonburi, Chumporn, Rayong, Samut Songkram, Satun, Songkla, Phattalung, Nakorn Sri Thammarat, Surat Th ani, Phang Nga, Krabi and Trang

Hosts. Apparently polyphagous attacking almost any woody plant in suitable condition. No hosts appear to have been recorded in Th ailand. Previously recorded from Hevea brasiliensis  in Malaysia by Tomimura (1993). Hevea brasiliensis  is given as a major host by CAB International (2004).

Biology. The biology of the species appears not to have been studied in detail, but is likely to resemble that of other species of Sinoxylon  ( Beeson and Bhatia 1937, Liu et al. 2008b). A summary of what is known is given in CAB International (2004 as S. conigerum  ). Tomimura (1993) showed that the adults and larvae reduced the starch content of rubber wood, but not the levels of holocellulose and lignin.

a

b

Tribe Xyloperthini 

Xylopsocus capucinus  (F.)

Fig. 10

Distribution. throughout South and Southeast Asia from India to the Indonesian archipelago, New Guinea, New Caledonia, and the Melanesian islands; Introduced into Africa, South America, USA Recorded in Th ailand from the provinces Chaiyaphum, Chiangmai, Krabi, Nakorn Sri Th ammarat, Phattalung, Phang Nga, Satun, Songkla, Surat Thani and Trang.

Hosts. Apparently polyphagous attacking almost any woody plant in suitable condition. Previously recorded from Hevea brasiliensis  in Malaysia by Miller (1934) and Hussein (1981). No hosts appear to have been recorded previously in Thailand.

Biology. Beeson and Bhatia (1937) note that in northern India, the adults emerge mainly between May and November, with a annual life cycle, that may be extended for a further one or occasionally two years. Woodruff et al. (2005) give further information from the published literature. Th e biology of the closely related species, Xylopsocus bicuspis Lesne  is described by Liu et al. (2008a).