Jatropha curcas L.

DeFilipps, Robert A. & Krupnick, Gary A., 2018, The medicinal plants of Myanmar, PhytoKeys 102, pp. 1-341: 69-70

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/phytokeys.102.24380

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03B714DB-4EBC-389C-4B7A-F2D6174646A1

treatment provided by

PhytoKeys by Pensoft

scientific name

Jatropha curcas L.
status

 

Jatropha curcas L. 

Names.

Myanmar: thin-baw-kyetsy, kyetsi-gyi, kyet-su-gyi, makman-yoo, siyo-kyetsu, thinbaw-kyetsu, tun-kong. English: Barbados nut, physic nut, purging nut, wild oil nut.

Range.

Tropical America. Cultivated in Myanmar.

Uses.

Leaf: Used as a galactagogue. Fruit and Seed: Employed as an anthelmintic. Seed: Aperient.

Notes.

Medicinal uses of this species in India are discussed in Jain and DeFilipps (1991). Indigenous medicinal uses of this species in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands (India) are described by Dagar and Singh (1999). Medicinal uses of this species in China are discussed by Duke and Ayensu (1985).

The medicinal uses of this plant in the Caribbean region, as well as its chemistry, biological activity, toxicity and dosages, are discussed by Germosén-Robineau (1997). The chemistry, pharmacology, history and medicinal uses of this species in Latin America are discussed in detail by Gupta (1995). The chemical constituents, pharmacological activities, and traditional medicinal uses of this plant on a worldwide basis are discussed in detail by Ross (1999). The chemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, and use of this species as a hunting poison and medicinal plant in Africa are discussed by Neuwinger (1994).

A pharmacognostical profile including medicinal uses of this plant in Africa is given in Iwu (1993). The toxic properties, symptoms, treatment and beneficial uses of this plant, parts of which are poisonous, are discussed by Nellis (1997). Data on the propagation, seed treatment and agricultural management of this species are given by Katende et al. (1995). Worldwide medicinal usage, chemical composition and toxicity of this species are discussed by Duke (1986). Seeds of Jatropha curcas  contain curcin, a poisonous chemical constituent which can cause death if ingested; plant sap can cause irritating dermatitis ( Lan et al. 1998).

References.

Nordal (1963), Perry (1980).

Kingdom

Plantae

Phylum

Tracheophyta

Class

Magnoliopsida

Order

ORDO

Family

FAMILIA

Genus

Jatropha