Uanauna angaporan,

Gonçalves, Lucas Campello-, Souto, Paula M., Mermudes, José R. M. & Silveira, Luiz F. L., 2019, Uanauna gen. nov., a new genus of fireflies endemic to the Brazilian Atlantic forest (Coleoptera: Lampyridae), with key to brazilian genera of Lucidotina, Zootaxa 4585 (1), pp. 59-72: 67-69

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4585.1.4

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:ABD5274A-864C-4120-BDB0-3FC0342E6BAB

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03BB1B13-FFFF-FFF8-FF16-FA76FDBF1D05

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Uanauna angaporan
status

sp. nov.

Uanauna angaporan  sp. nov. Campello-Gonçalves, Souto, Mermudes & Silveira 2019

( Figs 2–46View FIGURES 2–3View FIGURE 4View FIGURES 5–12View FIGURES 13–16View FIGURES 17–21View FIGURES 22–28View FIGURES 29–31View FIGURES 32–41View FIGURES 42–46)

Etymology. angaporan  is a composite word, gender neutral, name in apposition. From Tupi-guarani language anga, a corrupted form of angá, surprise; poran, a corrupted form of poranga, beautiful ( Barbosa 1951).

Diagnosis. body size around 6mm; elytra ( Figs. 2, 3View FIGURES 2–3, 42,43) brown to black with 3/4 of length and 2/5 of width of external lateral margins yellow-pale when elytra brown or white when elytra black, subparallel, lightly rounded. Male sternum IX ( Figs. 32–34View FIGURES 32–41) with lateral margins asymmetric, left margin divergent anteriad until ¼ length of plaque in ventral view, right margin divergent until 3/4 length in ventral view, then convergent, posterior margin slightly sinuous in ventral view; syntergite symmetric, as long as 1/2 core sternum IX length, anterior margin strongly indented, posterior margin rounded.

Description. Body length ca. 6mm ( Figs. 2, 3View FIGURES 2–3). Colour pattern brown to black except for 3/4 of length and 2/5 of width of external lateral margins yellow-pale when elytra brown to white when elytra black, and sternum VIII with a pair of spots of the rudimentary larval lanterns on sternum VIII ( Figs. 2, 3View FIGURES 2–3, 30View FIGURES 29–31).

Male. Posterior margin of pygidium emarginate in dorsal view; syntergite symmetric, as long as 1/2 core sternum IX length, anterior margin strongly indented, posterior margin rounded; sternum IX ( Figs. 32–34View FIGURES 32–41) asymmetric, left margin divergent up to posterior 1/4, right margin divergent until 3/4 length in ventral view, anterior margin rounded, slightly sinuose in ventral view.

Type material. Holotype:GoogleMaps  BRAZIL. Rio de Janeiro. Angra dos Reis. PEIG, 23° 08’ 49.9’’ S 44° 10’ 51.5’’ W, Male, VIII/2017, L. Campello, R. Queiroz, S. Vaz & L. Silveira col. (DZRJ).

Paratypes: BRAZIL. Rio de Janeiro  : Rio de Janeiro, Parque Nacional da Tijuca ( PNT), Setor Serra da Carioca, Corcovado , approx. 22° 57’ 27.6” S 43° 12’ 40.8” W, 3M, 3F, IX/1958, Alvarenga e Seabra col. ( MNRJ); idem, 7M, 3F, IX/1961, Alvarenga e Seabra col. ( DZUP); idem, 1M, IX/1967, Alvarenga e Seabra col. ( DZUP); idem, 1M, 3F, IX/1969, Alvarenga e Seabra col. ( MNRJ); Itaguaí , Parque Estadual Cunhambebe ( PEC) 22° 50’ 53.4” S 43° 54’ 29.3” W, 150m, 1M, IX/2011, L. Silveira, Clarkson Sampaio & Ferreira-Jr col. ( DZRJ); Angra dos Reis, Parque Estadual da Ilha Grande ( PEIG), approx. 23° 10’ 30.4’’ S 44° 11’ 11.3’’ W, 2F, IX/2008, Projeto Coleoptera  col. ( MNRJ). idem, 23° 08’ 49.9’’ S 44° 10’ 51.5” W, 336m, 1M, VIII/2017, L. Campello, R. Queiroz, S. Vaz & L. Silveira col. ( DZRJ). idem, 23° 08’ 51.5’’ S 44° 10’ 52.4’’ W, 345m, 1F, VIII/2017, L. Campello, R. Queiroz, S. Vaz & L. Silveira col. ( DZRJ). idem 23° 09’ 05.8’’ S 44° 11’ 19.9’’ W, 666m, 2F, IX/2017, L. Campello, R. Queiroz, S. Vaz & L. Silveira col. ( DZRJ). We note that the material belonging to the MNRJ will be maintained at DZRJ until the construction of a new building for the entomological collection, unfortunately destroyed during a terrible fire, recently (10/8/2018)GoogleMaps  .

Remarks. Uanauna angaporan  sp. nov. occurs on the coastal mountains of the Serra do Mar mountain range, in the South Fluminense region, at leastb from latitudes 23°95’ to 23°13’ All specimens were collected in Submontane and Montane regions: at the Tijuca National Park, by Alvarenga e Seabra col., (with no detailed information of elevation); at Parque Estadual Cunhambebe, at 150 m; and at Ilha Grande State Park, from 336 m to 666 m. Individuals were collected between August and September—at the end of winter and the beginning of spring, when temperatures are around 22°C and rainfall is relatively lower (in 9 collections during a 59-year interval, the first being in 1958 and the last one in 2017). Therefore, it seems that this species are univoltine swarmers, as many other fireflies (e.g. Scissicauda disjuncta; cf. Silveira et al. 2016b). In addition, even with few individuals found on the continental island of Ilha Grande, a small morphological variation is evident between two populations, such as elitral coloration (overall darker in PEIG individuals) and small marginal nuances in the shape of the sternum IX.

The two population spots of Uanauna angaporan  sp. nov. are geographically isolated from each other by the sea: one on the mainland, on the coast of Rio de Janeiro and the other on Ilha Grande (in this case, only four individuals were found, only one of these is male), also in the Rio de Janeiro state. The level of genetic isolation of these populations remains unknown. However, the two populations are likely isolated to some degree, given their characteristics typical of poor dispersers (e.g. small size, reduced crossvein), associated with those of assortative mating, evinced by the unique modifications of the terminalia ( Panhuis et al. 2001; Silveira et al. 2016a).

Terminal abdominal modifications have been proposed to promote reproductive isolation ( Silveira et al. 2016a), favoring the accumulation of independent anagenesis in parapatric populations, thus promoting speciation ( Panhuis et al. 2001). However, it must be noted that models of structural mechanisms of lock-andkey reproductive isolation have been supplanted by the sensory lock-and-key model in the literature. The latter is supposedly more common and effective in avoiding hybridization during reinforcement upon secondary contact ( Masly 2012). Nevertheless, the primary role of sensorial lock-and-key mechanisms in driving reproductive isolation has been challenged due to lack of evidence (e.g. Arnqvist 1998). Otherwise, there is increasing evidence that selection is an important factor prior to genital morphological variation ( Arnqvist 1998; Panhuis et al. 2001; Ritchie 2007), that is: instead of guiding genital diversification, the reproductive isolation is actually a product of sexual selection ( Panhuis et al. 2001). Furthermore, Panhuis et al. (2001) suggest that sexual selection favors allopatric speciation. In this context, Uanauna  gen. nov., as well as other poor-dispersing fireflies with stereotypic terminalia, emerge as promising model systems in the study of speciation and biogeography.

MNRJ

Museu Nacional/Universidade Federal de Rio de Janeiro

DZUP

Universidade Federal do Parana, Colecao de Entomologia Pe. Jesus Santiago Moure

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Coleoptera

Family

Lampyridae

Genus

Uanauna