Urupuyu, Ruiz, Gustavo R. S. & Maddison, Wayne P., 2015

Ruiz, Gustavo R. S. & Maddison, Wayne P., 2015, The new Andean jumping spider genus Urupuyu and its placement within a revised classification of the Amycoida (Araneae: Salticidae), Zootaxa 4040 (3), pp. 251-279 : 253-254

publication ID

https://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4040.3.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:392A2F34-0B0C-4298-BBF5-76A82CED0C59

DOI

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.6121668

persistent identifier

https://treatment.plazi.org/id/03C087CB-FF87-5446-FF05-FC20FD0DFE3C

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Urupuyu
status

gen. nov.

Urupuyu gen. nov.

Type species: Urupuyu antisana sp. nov.

Etymology: The generic name is a euphonic combination of the Quechuan words “uru” (=spider) and “puyu” (=cloud), in allusion to the Andean cloud forests where these spiders live. Neuter in gender.

Diagnosis: Urupuyu is a member of the huriines, a group distinguished from other South American amycoid lineages (except bredines) by the combination of chelicerae having a single retromarginal tooth and several promarginal teeth, and male palp with well developed RvTA pointing distally ( Figs 23 View FIGURES 22 – 26 , 28 View FIGURES 27 – 31 , 33 View FIGURES 32 – 35 ). Huriines differ from bredines in having a standard and more compact salticid body (flattened and elongate in bredines). Urupuyu differs from remaining huriine genera in having a complex RTA divided into two lobes, a more dorsal one forming a hook towards the cymbium ( Figs 24 View FIGURES 22 – 26 , 29 View FIGURES 27 – 31 , 34 View FIGURES 32 – 35 ), and a more ventral one, which can bear an acute projection ( Figs 23 View FIGURES 22 – 26 , 28 View FIGURES 27 – 31 , 33 View FIGURES 32 – 35 ); having a membranous projection along the embolus at the middle of its length ( Figs 9–10 View FIGURES 9 – 13 ); and being dark and more or less glabrous ( Figs 1–5 View FIGURES 1 – 5 ). Besides that, Urupuyu seems to be the only huriine genus with a cleft on the tegulum ( Figs 9 View FIGURES 9 – 13 , arrow within triangle, 22). The epigyne in Urupuyu is similar to that of Scoturius in having the initial portion of the copulation ducts dilated as a chamber (marked with arrow in Figs 26 View FIGURES 22 – 26 , 31 View FIGURES 27 – 31 ; the female of Atelurius is still unknown), but differs in having more separate copulation openings and longer copulation ducts ( Figs 25 –26 View FIGURES 22 – 26 , 30– 31 View FIGURES 27 – 31 ). The molecular data suggest Urupuyu and Scoturius are distinct ( Figs 37, 38 View FIGURES 37 – 38 ).

Description: Small (2.5 –3.0 mm), dark salticids ( Figs 1–5 View FIGURES 1 – 5 ) from vegetation of high elevation forests. Carapace covered with small depressions, in the middle of which there is a pore ( Figs 1 View FIGURES 1 – 5 , 6– 8 View FIGURES 6 – 8 ; see note below). Between these depressions with pores there are minute punctuations. The clypeus is low in both sexes. No scales on carapace. Chelicera small and vertical in both sexes, with 3–4 promarginal teeth ( Figs 11–13 View FIGURES 9 – 13 ) and a single, simple retromarginal tooth. Male palp: unmodified femur and patella. Tibia with a wide RTA forming a hook dorsally ( Figs 24 View FIGURES 22 – 26 , 29 View FIGURES 27 – 31 , 34 View FIGURES 32 – 35 ) (also with an acute retrolateral projection in some species) and an acute RvTA ( Figs 23 View FIGURES 22 – 26 , 28 View FIGURES 27 – 31 , 33 View FIGURES 32 – 35 ). Cymbium drop-shaped. Tegulum roundish, bearing a cleft ( Fig. 22 View FIGURES 22 – 26 ). Embolus fixed to the tegulum and curling around it, with a median blunt projection lying in a pit of the prolateral side of tegulum ( Figs 9–10 View FIGURES 9 – 13 ). Legs can be black or yellow ( Figs 1–5 View FIGURES 1 – 5 ). Leg formula: males 1423, females 4123. Male second tarsus with modified scale-like setae ( Figs 15–17 View FIGURES 14 – 17 ). Tarsal claws small. Claw tufts poorly developed. Males with dorsal abdominal scutum and epiandrous fusules ( Fig. 14 View FIGURES 14 – 17 ). Epigyne: posterior border slightly indented, with no conspicuous pocket ( Figs 25 View FIGURES 22 – 26 , 30 View FIGURES 27 – 31 ). U-shaped copulation openings connected to each other, forming an atrium. Copulation ducts begin wide and extend backwards, fold at the center and extend anteriorly. Beneath the copulation openings they fold backwards again and connect to small spermathecae, from which fertilization ducts emerge ( Figs 26 View FIGURES 22 – 26 , 31 View FIGURES 27 – 31 ). Spinnerets ( Figs 18–21 View FIGURES 18 – 21 ; examined only in U. antisana , male): the ALS has one major ampullate spigot (MAP) and one nubbin (n) surrounded by about nine piriform (pi) spigots ( Fig. 19 View FIGURES 18 – 21 ); the PMS has a single minor ampullate spigot (mAP) and four aciniform (ac) spigots ( Fig. 20 View FIGURES 18 – 21 ); the PLS has about five or six aciniform spigots ( Fig. 21 View FIGURES 18 – 21 ).

Note. Such depressions with pores on the carapace have also been found in non-salticids Teutamus Thorell, 1890 ( Liocranidae ), Orthobula Simon, 1897 ( Phrurolithidae ) and in trachelid spiders ( Ramírez 2014: fig. 6 D, character 5 in phylogeny).

Distribution. Cloud forests of Ecuador.

PMS

Prirodonamen Muzej Skopje

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Arachnida

Order

Araneae

Family

Salticidae