Scopocirinae

Ruiz, Gustavo R. S. & Maddison, Wayne P., 2015, The new Andean jumping spider genus Urupuyu and its placement within a revised classification of the Amycoida (Araneae: Salticidae), Zootaxa 4040 (3), pp. 251-279 : 273-274

publication ID

https://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4040.3.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:392A2F34-0B0C-4298-BBF5-76A82CED0C59

DOI

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.6121700

persistent identifier

https://treatment.plazi.org/id/03C087CB-FF93-5452-FF05-F954FD4DFE89

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Scopocirinae
status

 

Subfamily Scopocirinae Simon, 1901

Scopocireae Simon, 1901: 442, 1048 (Type genus: Scopocira Simon, 1900 ).

Monophyly: The two genera included here are only tentatively associated, as the DNA data for Gypogyna are weak, as are the morphological synapomorphies linking it with Scopocira . Males of both Scopocira and Gypogyna have apophyses on the distal prolateral portion of the chelicerae, but these are closer to the promarginal teeth, rather than on a more dorsal (external) position on the chelicerae. It is not clear whether these structures could be homologous to the amycine (plesiomorphic) mastidia or independently evolved projections. There is a dorsally placed RTA that appears to engage against a lobe of the cymbium, possibly to serve as a lock during copulation (see Costa & Ruiz 2014: figs 80–107). Both genera also share a feature unusual among spiders: males are typically larger than females. However, this is also seen, for example, in some gophoines.

Although Gypogyna is only tentatively placed with Scopocira , it can be placed with more confidence in the larger clade of node 2 ( Fig. 37 View FIGURES 37 – 38 ) by molecular data, as well as by the form of the spermathecae and copulatory ducts, and the terminal embolus loop over the cymbium.

DNA

Department of Natural Resources, Environment, The Arts and Sport

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Arachnida

Order

Araneae

Family

Salticidae