Macrobrachium jelskii ( Miers, 1877 )

Vera, Ana Luiza, Carvalho, Fabrício Lopes & Mantelatto, Fernando Luis, 2017, Redescription of the freshwater shrimp Macrobrachium jelskii (Miers, 1877) (Caridea, Palaemonidae), Zootaxa 4269 (1), pp. -1--1: -1

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4269.1.2

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:7774D8D9-800E-4B81-AFB9-81F8B63623CE

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03C687FF-040B-FF9A-80B4-E7E9CE195092

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Macrobrachium jelskii ( Miers, 1877 )
status

 

Macrobrachium jelskii ( Miers, 1877) 

( Figure 2View FIGURE 2).

Palaemon jelskii Miers, 1877: 661  , plate LXVII, fig. 1.

Bithynis jelskii  — Young, 1900: 489.

Macrobrachium amazonicus  — Schmitt, 1936: 373.

Macrobrachium jelskii  — Chace & Holthuis, 1948: 23;— Holthuis, 1950: 30;— Holthuis, 1952: 26, Pl. 4, fig. a – d;—Chace & Hobbs, 1969: 109, Fig. 25;— Kensley & Walker, 1982: 9, Fig. 10;— Rodríguez, 1982: 386;— Barros & Braun, 1997: 15;— Ramos-Porto & Coelho, 1998: 334;— Collins, 2000: 1167, Fig. 1View FIGURE 1;— García-Dávila & Magalhães, 2003: 672, Fig. 18 – 20;— Melo, 2003: 362, Fig. 207;— Magalhães et al., 2005: 1934;— Almeida et al., 2008: 1235, Fig. 5View FIGURE 5;— Sampaio et al., 2009: 20, Fig. 6View FIGURE 6;— Pileggi et al., 2013: 116.

Type material. The syntypes are deposited in the Natural History Museum (NHM 7921) in London. Miers (1877) reported the existence of two syntypes collected in Oiapoque, French Guiana. However, only one female was found and analyzed in the mentioned collection (cl 15 mm).

Additional analyzed material. Venezuela, Guarico. USNM 231497View Materials, Fundo Masaguaral, coll. Vari et al., 19 January 1983  ; USNM 228713View Materials, Río Orinoco , Isla Tortola, coll. Baskin et al., 19 February 1978  .— Brazil, Amazonas  . 4 females (cl 5.8–6.8 mm), INPA CR 211, Rio Negro, down rio Daraá , 0°45’S 64°75’W, coll. Goldin, Feb. 1980  ; USNM 231204View Materials, San Jose, Lago Castanho, Janauri, coll. Bayley, 4 December 1978  ; 4 females (cl 7.5– 8.1 mm), INPA CR 107, Rio Amazonas, Ilha do Careiro, 3°16’S 59°73’’W, coll. Magalhães, 4 November 1981  . Pará. 5 males (cl 6.2–6.8 mm)  , 3 females (cl 5.8–6.9 mm), 2 ovigerous females (cl 8.6–8.7 mm), CCDB 4337View Materials, under bridge on the highway, Castanhal , 01°18’6.37’’S 47°59’11.88’’W, coll. Carvalho et al., 14 November 2012GoogleMaps  ; 2 males (cl 4.6–4.75 mm), 1 female (cl 3.49 mm), CCDB 4356View Materials, Santa Maria do Pará, 01°22’51.16’’S 47°33’56.42’’W, coll. Carvalho et al., 15 November 2012GoogleMaps  ; 5 females (cl 8.5–9.9 mm), INPA CR 117, Rio Curuá do Sul, near Santarém , 02°26’34’’S 54°42’28’’W, coll. ichthyology team of INPA, 15 November 1977GoogleMaps  ; 1 ovigerous female (cl 11.6 mm), CCDB 4992View Materials, Igarapé , Senador José Porfírio 03°05’04,8’’S 51°47’21,1’’W, coll. Robles et al., 2 March 2014GoogleMaps  . Maranhão. 2 males (cl 7.8 mm)  , 2 females (cl 7.7–8.7 mm), 2 ovigerous females (cl 7.1 mm), CCDB 1578View Materials, Riacho do Brejinho, Caxias , 04° 51’S 43° 21’W, coll. Camara, 13 October 2003GoogleMaps  . Ceará. 1 female (cl 8.2 mm), CCDB 4569View Materials, Açude Bengue, Aiuaba , 6°35’58.2’’S 40°08’30.3’’W, coll. Landim et al., 19 September 2012GoogleMaps  ; 2 females (cl 9.1–10.5 mm), CCDB 4712View Materials, Açude Sabiá , Juazeiro do Norte, 7°12’S 39°18’W, coll. Anderson et al., 15 May 2011GoogleMaps  . Paraíba. 1 female (cl 9.5 mm), CCDB 4568View Materials, Rio Piranhas , São Bento, 6°46’80’’S 37°48’77.7’’W, coll. Landim et al., 14 June 2012  ; 1 male (cl 6.6 mm), 2 females (cl 6.7–9.6 mm), CCDB 1866View Materials, Rio Jaguaribe, João Pessoa , 7°05’S 34°51’W, coll. Farias, 21 September 1977GoogleMaps  . Sergipe. 1 ovigerous female (cl 9.9 mm), CCDB 4567View Materials, Rio Itamirim , 11°24’59.5’’S 37°42’19.6’’W, coll. Landim, 26 February 2013GoogleMaps  . Bahia. 1 male (cl 6.9 mm), CCDB 2625View Materials, Ilha de Itaparica, Vera Cruz , 12°54’S 38°40’W, coll. Batista, 15 July 2006GoogleMaps  ; 2 males (cl 6.6–7.9 mm), 2 females (cl 7.7–8.4 mm), 3 ovigerous females (cl 7.7 mm), CCDB 3794View Materials, Rio Vermelho, Elísio Medrado , 13°0’0.68’’S 39°30’22.63’’W, coll. Carvalho & Souza-Carvalho, 26 December 2011GoogleMaps  ; 1 female (cl 7.4 mm), CCDB 3796View Materials, Mutuípe , 13°13’S 39°30’W, coll. Carvalho & Souza-Carvalho, 25 December 2011GoogleMaps  ; 1 female (cl 8.1 mm), CCDB 2788View Materials, Rio de Contas , 13°52’29’’S 40°34’44’’W, coll. Calado, 1 November 2009GoogleMaps  ; 1 female (cl 5 mm), CCDB 1566View Materials, Rio Tijuípe, Itacaré , 14°23’55.46’’S 39°02’34.74’’W, coll. Carvalho et al., 11 August 2011GoogleMaps  ; 1 male (cl 6.9 mm), CCDB 1254View Materials, Riacho Pancadinha, Uruçuca , 14°27’58.18’’S 39°02’13.34’’W, coll. Carvalho et al., 11 August 2011GoogleMaps  ; 1 female (cl 7.1 mm), CCDB 4355View Materials, Riacho Pancadinha, Uruçuca , 14°27.943’S 39°02.207’W, coll. Mantelatto et al., 6 November 2010GoogleMaps  ; 3 males (cl 5.2–7.0 mm), 2 females (cl 6.4–9.2 mm), CCDB 3041View Materials, Ilhéus , 15°1.02’S 38°59.93’W, coll. Mantelatto et al., 5 November 2010GoogleMaps  ; 1 female (cl 8.1 mm), CCDB 3087View Materials, Rio Jacão, Una 15°17.22’S 39°05.16’W, coll. Mantelatto et al., 5 November 2010GoogleMaps  ; 1 male (cl 5.6 mm), CCDB 1657View Materials, Estação Veracel Celulose, Porto Seguro , 16°23’1.97’’S 39°07’34.08’’W, coll. Carvalho & Souza-Carvalho, 15 August 2011GoogleMaps  ; 1 female (cl 6.8 mm), CCDB 4203View Materials, stream of Lagoa Grande, Prado , 17°18’13.18’’S 39°13’26.20’’W, coll. Carvalho & Souza-Carvalho, 13 August 2012GoogleMaps  ; 3 males (cl 6.2–6.3 mm), 2 females (cl 5.9–8.0 mm), CCDB 4201View Materials, trubutary of the river Jucuruçu, bridge on the highway BA 489, Prado , 17°18’22.42’’S 39°15’17.35’’W, coll. Carvalho & Souza-Carvalho, 13 August 2012GoogleMaps  . Mato Grosso. 3 males (cl 6.5–7.8 mm)  , 4 females (cl 7.6–8.1 mm), INPA CR 218, Rio das Pitas, Araputanga , 15°25’44’’S 58°20’39’’W, coll. Py-Daniel et al., 29 September 1984GoogleMaps  . Minas Gerais. 2 males (cl 6.6–7.4 mm)  , 3 females (cl 9.4–9.7 mm), CCDB 478View Materials, Rio São Francisco, Pirapora , 17°22’5.9’’S 44°56’39.13’’W, coll. Carvalho & Souza-Carvalho, 15 July 2011GoogleMaps  ; 1 female (cl 8.4 mm), CCDB 2952View Materials, Pirapitinga, Três Marias , 18°20’S 45°18’W, coll. Jacobucci, 1 November 2009GoogleMaps  ; 2 males (cl 6.6–7.4 mm), 3 females (cl 7.4–8.3 mm), MZUSP 28360, Lagoa Carioca, Marliéria – Dionísio, 19°45’26.3’’S 42°37’6.2’’W, coll. Fragozo- Moura et al., 1 July 2007. Espírito Santo. 3 males (cl 6.3–7.6 mm)  , 3 females (cl 8.3–8.6 mm), CCDB 2627View Materials, Lagoa Grande, Vila Velha , 20°30’S 40°22’W, coll. Mantelatto et al., 3 November 2006GoogleMaps  ; 2 males (cl 5.9–6.5 mm), 2 females (cl 8.2–10.0 mm), 3 ovigerous females (cl 7.6–8.5 mm), CCDB 2628View Materials, Córrego Sete, Vila Velha , 20°32’05’’S 40°23'18’’W, coll. Mantelatto et al., 3 November 2006GoogleMaps  ; 1 ovigerous female (cl 8.4 mm), CCDB 2842View Materials, Lagoa de Maeaípe, Guarapari , 20°44’20.8’’S 40°32'49.5’’W, coll. Mantelatto et al., 3 November 2006. Rio de Janeiro. 4 males (cl 5.0– 7.5mm)GoogleMaps  , 5 females (cl 6.6–8.8 mm), 1 ovigerous female (cl 9.1 mm), CCDB 4941View Materials, Rodovia Italva km 67, Itaperuna , 21°21’39.3’’S 41°42’29.6’’W, coll. Oliveira, 10 October 2013GoogleMaps  ; 1 female (cl 7.0 mm), CCDB 4991View Materials, Córrego Caranguejo, Cardoso Moreira , 21°27’43’’S 41°40’54.8’’W, coll. Oliveira, 10 October 2013GoogleMaps  ; 1 female (cl 6.7 mm), CCDB 4650View Materials, Pureza, Cambuci , 21°35’14.3’’S 41°50’37.5’’W, coll. Carvalho et al., 24 May 2013GoogleMaps  . São Paulo. 2 males (cl 4.9–5.1 mm)  , 2 females (cl 9.1–13.0 mm), 2 ovigerous females (cl 9.6–10.4 mm), CCDB 1562View Materials, Rio Grande, Paulo de Faria , 20°01’S 49°24’W, coll. Santos et al., 12 July 2001GoogleMaps  ; 2 males (cl 5.9– 6.5 mm), 3 females (cl 6.8–7.7 mm), CCDB 3520View Materials, Clube Náutico de Araraquara, Araraquara , 21°42’17’’S 48°01’33’’W, coll. Peiró, 30 June 2007GoogleMaps  .

Diagnosis. Rostrum: slender; slightly curved upward; reaches just beyond scaphocerite; reach the end of scaphocerite in fewer cases; one-third distal dorsal rostral margin without teeth; 5–9 dorsal teeth; 1–2 subapical teeth; 1–2 teeth behind orbit; 4–7 ventral teeth. Right and left second pereiopod similar in shape and size; slender; glabrous; carpus bulge at distal end; carpus 1.3 to 2.1 times chela; chela 0.4 to 0.5 the carapace length. Telson: posterior margin ending in a median apex; 2 pairs of plumose setae; 2 pairs of spines; internal pair of posterior spine distinctly surpassing posterior median apex.

Redescription. Rostrum: slender; slightly curved upward; reaches just beyond scaphocerite; reach end of scaphocerite in fewer cases; distal third of the dorsal edge of the rostrum without teeth; 5–9 teeth on the dorsal edge, generally 6 or 7; 1 or 2 subapical teeth on the dorsal edge; 1 or 2 teeth behind the orbit; 4–7 teeth on the ventral edge, generally 6 or 7; rostrum 1.3 to 1.5 times the scaphocerite length ( Figure 3View FIGURE 3 a).

Eyes: well developed; pigmented cornea; eyespot on dorsal side ( Figure 3View FIGURE 3 b).

Antennule: single lower antennular flagellum; upper antennular flagellum divided in two branches, fused in the base to almost 1/3 of the length of the shorter branch. Anterolateral projection of the first antennular segment reaches about 1/3 of the second segment; with rounded margin. Anterolateral spine of the first antennular segment reaches the margin of the anterolateral projection. Projection of the second antennular segment almost reaches the distal margin of the third segment. Stylocerite reaches just before the half of the first antennular segment ( Figure 3View FIGURE 3 c).

Scaphocerite: length about 3.5 times the width; external margin straight or slightly concave ( Figure 3View FIGURE 3 d).

Carapace: smooth; hepatic spine the same size as the antennal spine, placed at an angle behind it; length of the carapace 0.7 to 0.9 times the rostrum ( Figure 3View FIGURE 3 a).

Mouth parts: mandible with 3-segmented palp; setae on all segments; apical setae longer. Molar and incisor process well developed; incisor process with 3 teeth on both mandibles; superior tooth bigger than the other; molar process subdivided in 5 cusps: 2 poorly developed, 2 of median size and 1 well developed ( Figure 3View FIGURE 3 e). Maxillule with bilobated lacinia mobilis; distal lobe with scattered setae; 2 rows of spiniform setae at the apical area; ventral side with few setae; dorsal side of the proximal lobe with many setae, scattered at the base and get more numerous at the apex; upper lacinia curved; internal lacinia curved with a twined spiniform seta ( Figures 3View FIGURE 3 f and 3g). Endopod of the maxilla with two well developed lobes and numerous setae at the apex of both; epipod with a slightly sharp end starting from the fused coxa and basis; operculiform exopod (scaphognathite), well developed, with setae all around the edge ( Figure 3View FIGURE 3 h). First maxilliped with rectangular endopod; convex inner edge; numerous setae at the external edge, invading the dorsal side; laminiform exopod; bilobated epipod, with triangular anterior lobe elongated anteriorly ( Figures 3View FIGURE 3 i and 3j). Second maxilliped operculiform; condyles of the carpus moderately pronounced over the propodus; propodus and dactylus strongly expanded, with numerous setae at the edge directed posteriorly covering the mouth appendices; basis with laminiform exopod, well developed, with setae at the apex; coxa with few setae ( Figure 3View FIGURE 3 k). Third maxilliped pediform and elongated; basis, ischium and merus fused, distally enlarged; laminiform exopod reaches the proximal edge of the carpus; setae at the apex; coxa with lobed epipod; many setae over all segments, mainly the propodus and dactylus ( Figure 3View FIGURE 3 l).

Pereiopods: first pair of pereiopods smooth; distal third of the dactylus reaches the distal margin of the scaphocerite; fingers slightly bigger than the palm, with sharp edges; carpus 1.7 to 3.3 times the length of the chela, 0.9 to 1.6 times the merus; merus almost 2 times the length of the ischium; segments with scattered setae, denser in the ischium and fingers ( Figure 4View FIGURE 4 a). Second pair of pereiopods slender and entirely smooth; most of the chela reaches beyond the scaphocerite; right and left equal in shape and size; ischium slightly shorter than the merus; merus 1.1 to 1.5 times the length of the carpus; carpus slender and smooth with a bulging at the distal end, 1.3 to 2.1 times the length of the chela; length of the chela 5.1 to 6.6 it width; length of the chela 0.4 to 0.5 times the carapace length; cylindrical palm, elongated and slightly flattened laterally; fingers 3/4 of the palm length; cutting edges of both fingers have 1 small tooth at the proximal third; small gap at the proximal third that can bear some indistinct teeth or crenulations ( Figure 4View FIGURE 4 b). Third pair of pereiopods smooth, except for some scattered setae and a row of setae at the posterior margin of the propodus; shorter than scaphocerite; propodus 3.5 times the length of the dactylus; propodus 2 times the length of the carpus; propodus a little smaller than the merus ( Figure 4View FIGURE 4 c). Fourth pair of pereiopods smooth, except for some scattered setae and a row of setae at the posterior margin of the propodus; half of the dactylus reaches beyond the scaphocerite; propodus 4 times the length of the dactylus; propodus 2 times the length of the carpus; propodus is same size as merus ( Figure 4View FIGURE 4 d). Fifth pair of pereiopods smooth, except for some scattered setae and a row of setae at the posterior margin of the propodus; the entire dactylus reaches beyond the scaphocerite; propodus 4 times the length of the dactylus; propodus little more than 1.5 times the length of the carpus; propodus is the same size as the merus ( Figure 4View FIGURE 4 e).

Thoracic sternum: fourth thoracic sternum with median process well developed; forming a triangle; distinct post-coxal edges, posteriorly placed to the median process.

Abdomen: no appendix interna in the first pair of pleopods; endopod reaches half of the exopod in males ( Figure 4View FIGURE 4 f); endopod of females 1/5 to 1/3 the length of the exopod ( Figure 4View FIGURE 4 g). Second pair of pleopods of males bears an appendix masculina ( Figure 4View FIGURE 4 h). Abdominal pleura with setae on the ventral margin ( Figure 4View FIGURE 4 i); pleura of the fifth somite ending in an acute angle; sixth abdominal segment almost 2 times the length of the fifth. Interuropodial sclerite with rounded anal carina, poorly developed.

Telson: almost 1.5 times the length of the sixth abdominal segment; posterior margin ending in a median apex; four dorsal spines, one pair placed at half of the length of the telson and one pair placed more distally; two pairs of posterior spines, the inner ones are slender and strait, distinctly surpass the median apex of posterior margin; internal pair of spine 2.1 to 3.3 longer than median apex of telson; 4 plumose setae between internal spines ( Figure 4View FIGURE 4 j).

Uropods: well-developed stout spine on the lateral end of the diaresis of the uropodal exopod, distinctly longer than the distolateral tooth ( Figure 4View FIGURE 4 k).

Eggs: few and large, major diameter measures 1.9 to 2.3 mm.

Size: analyzed males reached up to 7.8 mm of carapace length; females up to 15 mm. In general females were bigger than males.

Distribution. Trinidad, Suriname, Guyana, Venezuela, Peru, Bolivia, Argentina and Brazil (Amapá, Amazonas, Pará, Maranhão, Ceará, Rio Grande do Norte, Paraíba, Pernambuco, Alagoas, Sergipe, Bahia, Acre, Mato Grosso, Espírito Santo, Rio de Janeiro, Minas Gerais, São Paulo and Paraná) ( Pileggi 2009; Boos et al. 2012; Pileggi et al. 2013).

Remarks. The occurrence of M. jelskii  in Costa Rica cited by Chace & Hobbs (1969) and Kensley & Walker (1982) is doubtful, uncertain and most probably incorrect. One of us (FLM) has been working on an exhaustive sampling freshwater decapod project in Costa Rica over the last seven years and there is no record there (Wehrtmann & Mantelatto unpublished data). Some disagreements between the morphological information in the literature and the data obtained from this study were observed. To cite some, Holthuis (1952), Collins (2000), García-Dávila & Magalhães (2003), Melo (2003), Pileggi (2009) and Sampaio et al. (2009) reported that the rostrum of M. jelskii  distinctly surpasses the scaphocerite, however this proportion was rarely observed in the 122 analyzed individuals, males, females and juveniles of different sizes, including the type material. The rostrum of these specimens is slightly longer than the scaphocerite (i.e. at most one tooth in the ventral edge of the rostrum reaches beyond the scaphocerite) or, in a few cases, is the same size as the scaphocerite. The diagnostic characteristics of M. jelskii  can be very similar to those of immature individuals of Macrobrachium amazonicum  ( García-Dávila & Magalhães 2003; Pileggi 2009) and M. acanthurus  . To differentiate them, Holthuis (1952) suggested analyzing the number of teeth of the rostrum, but this character showed to be highly variable and inconclusive. Thus, the ratio of carpus and chela of the second pereiopod is suitable to differentiate M. jelskii  and M. acanthurus  and this difference was supported by the statistical analysis (p = 4.53·10-10). This ratio is higher in M. jelskii  , the carpus of this species is distinctly longer than the chela (between 1.34 and 2.13), while in M. acanthurus  the carpus is similar to the chela (ratio of carpus and chela ranges between 0.91 and 1.45). Besides that, the carpus of the M. jelskii  is more slender and has an abrupt bulging at the distal extremity than that of M. amazonicum  and M. acanthurus  . In the last two mentioned species, the proximal part of the carpus is narrow and gradually extends towards the distal part compared to that of M. jelskii  . The ratio of the chela of the second pereiopod and the carapace length is also different and statistically supported (p = 5.56·10-8) between M. jelskii  (0.38 to 0.54) and M. acanthurus  (0.53 to 0.78). Both the rostrum and the telson of M. jelskii  and M. acanthurus  are alike, but these characteristics are different in M. amazonicum  . The rostrum of M. amazonicum  is longer than that of M. jelskii  , and distinctly surpasses the scaphocerite (two or more teeth on the ventral edge of the rostrum can reach beyond the scaphocerite, although there can be one or no ventral teeth beyond the scaphocerite), it usually has a more evident portion without teeth and is more curved upwards. In adult individuals, the inner posterior spines of the telson usually do not surpass the median apex as those in M. jelskii  and M. acanthurus  . In smaller individuals of M. amazonicum  (carapace length equal or smaller than 5 mm), the inner posterior spines of the telson can exceed the median apex. Differences were found and supported by statistical analysis for the ratio between the internal posterior spine and median apex (p = 3.99·10-9; 2.14 to 3.35 for M. jelskii  and 1.16 to 2.11 for M. amazonicum  ) and the ratio between the internal posterior spine and the carapace length (p = 2.61·10-6; 0.09 to 0.16 for M. jelskii  and 0.06 to 0.12 for M. amazonicum  —although there is an overlap, the internal posterior spine of M. jelskii  tends to be proportionately longer). The mentioned characteristics used to differentiate these three species are summarized in Table 1 and Figure 5View FIGURE 5. Other morphometric characters, i.e. ratio of the carpus and chela, and the ratio of the carpus and merus of the first pereiopod; the ratio of the merus and carpus, and the ratio of the length and width of the chela of the second pereiopod; the ratio of the carapace length and rostrum; the ratio of the rostrum and the scaphocerite, did not show statistical significant differences and could not be used to differentiate the three species of Macrobrachium  .

Other additional reproductive characters that help to differentiate these species are the size and number of eggs. Females of M. jelskii  bear larger and fewer eggs (1.9 to 2.3 mm, varies between 10 and 69— Soares 2008; Mossolin et al. 2013) than females of M. amazonicum  (0.6 to 0.8 mm, varies between 696 and 2956— Silva et al. 2004; Meireles et al. 2013) and M. acanthurus  (0.47 to 0.65 mm, varies between 171 and 7034— Tamburus et al. 2012). These characters are associated with the abbreviated larval development type of M. jelskii  ( Gamba 1984; Jalihal et al. 1993).

USNM

Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History

INPA

Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia

CCDB

Crustacean Collection of the Department of Biology

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Malacostraca

Order

Decapoda

Family

Palaemonidae

Genus

Macrobrachium

Loc

Macrobrachium jelskii ( Miers, 1877 )

Vera, Ana Luiza, Carvalho, Fabrício Lopes & Mantelatto, Fernando Luis 2017
2017
Loc

Macrobrachium jelskii

Pileggi 2013: 116
Sampaio 2009: 20
Almeida 2008: 1235
Magalhaes 2005: 1934
Garcia-Davila 2003: 672
Melo 2003: 362
Collins 2000: 1167
Ramos-Porto 1998: 334
Barros 1997: 15
Kensley 1982: 9
Rodriguez 1982: 386
Holthuis 1952: 26
Holthuis 1950: 30
Chace 1948: 23
1948
Loc

Macrobrachium amazonicus

Schmitt 1936: 373
1936
Loc

Bithynis jelskii

Young 1900: 489
1900
Loc

Palaemon jelskii

Miers 1877: 661