Aleiodes pallidator

Shaw, Scott R., Marsh, Paul M. & Talluto, Miranda A., 2013, Revision of North American Aleiodes (Part 9): the pallidator (Thunberg) species-group with description of two new species (Hymenoptera: Braconidae, Rogadinae), Zootaxa 3608 (3), pp. 204-214: 205

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3608.3.4

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:A185558F-DD40-4C25-AA5D-D1058FC1B901

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03CF87D2-212B-A02C-FF06-FC7F0DC530D2

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Aleiodes pallidator
status

 

ALEIODES PALLIDATOR  SPECIES-GROUP

Included Species: pallidator (Thunberg)  1822, Europe, introduced into North America; lymantriae (Watanabe)  1937, new combination, Japan, introduced into North America; indiscretus (Reardon)  1970, new combination, India, introduced into North America; martini  new species, Florida; xanthoclypeus  new species, Canada and northern U.S.A.

Distinguishing Characters. Eyes and ocelli large ( Figs 1View FIGURES 1 – 4, 6View FIGURES 5 – 8, 10View FIGURES 9 – 12, 13View FIGURES 13 – 16, 18View FIGURES 17 – 22), diameter of lateral ocellus greater than ocell-ocular distance, lateral ocellus width usually at least 2 x wider than ocell-ocular distance; malar space shorter than basal width of mandible ( Figs 5View FIGURES 5 – 8, 9View FIGURES 9 – 12, 17View FIGURES 17 – 22); hind wing vein RS sinuate ( Figs 4View FIGURES 1 – 4, 16View FIGURES 13 – 16), marginal cell narrowest in middle or near apical 2 / 3 distance from wing base; tarsal claws either entirely pectinate ( Fig. 12View FIGURES 9 – 12) or with strong pre-apical spines along base of claw ( Fig. 3View FIGURES 1 – 4); koinobiont parasitoids of Lymantriidae  caterpillars ( Figs 23–28View FIGURES 23 – 28).

Comments. The pallidator  species-group was defined and discussed by Fortier and Shaw (1999). Species of this group are seldom collected as commonly as those of many other Aleiodes  species-groups; however, they are very distinctive because of their exceptionally large ocelli ( Figs 1View FIGURES 1 – 4, 6View FIGURES 5 – 8, 10View FIGURES 9 – 12, 13View FIGURES 13 – 16, 18View FIGURES 17 – 22). This is a small group of species, most of which are known to attack Lymantriidae  caterpillars ( Figs 23–28View FIGURES 23 – 28). Three Old World species have been released in North America as potential biological control agents for the gypsy moth ( Fig. 24View FIGURES 23 – 28).

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Hymenoptera

Family

Braconidae

Genus

Aleiodes