Neolaelaps windsori , Shaw, Matthew D., 2011

Shaw, Matthew D., 2011, Laelapidae (Acari: Mesostigmata) on megachiropteran bats: new records and a new species of Neolaelaps Hirst, Zootaxa 2807, pp. 41-56: 51-53

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.5281/zenodo.277087

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03D14F71-FF9F-FFCF-FF56-07E82529FCE9

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Neolaelaps windsori
status

sp. nov.

Neolaelaps windsori  sp. nov.

( Figs 20–25View FIGURES 20 – 25)

Neolaelaps vitzthumi  (partim, series from Mt Windsor) Domrow 1988: 931, Fig. 63–69.

Specimens examined. Holotype. Female, Mt Windsor, nr Mossman, North Queensland, January 1981, I.D. Fanning coll., ex Pteropus scapulatus Peters, S  88518 (in QM); 2 paratype females, same data, S 85519View Materials –85520 (QM).

Dorsum: Dorsal shield 470–500 x 203–210 ( Fig. 20View FIGURES 20 – 25). Idiosoma  530–545 x 315–350. An unpaired medial seta present within dorsal hexagon in holotype and in one paratype. Prominent vertex bearing j 1–2, z 1. Podonotal j 1 shorter than other setae, Z 5 very long> 100. Podonotum with 22 pairs setae plus two pairs of ax setae ( Fig. 20View FIGURES 20 – 25) (n= 3): j 1 14 (11–15), j 2 44 (49–51), j 3 50 (49–50), j 4 50 (50–52), j 5 51 (51–55), j 6 52 (52–53), z 1 22 (22–29), z 2 50 (50–53), z 3 45 (45–48), z 4 50 (50–54), z 5 55 (51–55), z 6 52 (52–56), s 1 35 (35–40), s 2 37 (37–39), s 3 37 (34– 39), s 4 50 (40–50), s 5 50 (47–57), s 6 45 (44–49), ax setae 40 (40–46), r 2 25 (25–30), r 3 33 (33–38), r 4 31 (31–36), r 5 47 (41–47). Opisthonotum with 15 pairs of setae, S 3 missing on right side of holotype ( Fig. 20View FIGURES 20 – 25, and Fig. 63 of Domrow, 1988): J 1 50 (50–57), J 2 55 (55–57), J 3 51 (47–51), J 4 44 (44–48), J 5 35 (32–36), Z 1 49 (49–53), Z 2 48 (48–54), Z 3 49 (47–52), Z 4 50 (50–53), Z 5 110 (100–119), S 1 38 (38–46), S 2 42 (39–46), S 3 40 (40–45), S 4 45 (44–45), S 5 42 (36–43).

Venter: ( Fig. 21View FIGURES 20 – 25) Tritosternal base squat, 20 μm (19–21) to suture. Laciniae 71 (71–80) long, separate, arising directly from level of suture and bearing usual lateral cilia and also fine ventral spicules. Presternal shields absent. Sternal shield subquadrate, 129 (122–129) wide x 100 (95–100) deep, edges well-defined, posterior border a mild concave arch, cornua essentially absent. Sternal shield bearing very long and finely tapering setae, St 1–3: 108, 85, 105. Two pairs lyrifissures present. Metasternal plate appears absent, st 4 on endopodal shield. Short genito-ventral shield 60 (57–60), 85 wide at st 5, maximum width 110 (105–111), bearing three setae (st 5 and associated pore plus Zv 1 and Jv 1). Exopodal IV a mere sliver posteriad coxa IV, 9 wide. Spiracular atrium massively enlarged, 45 across. Peritrematal channel very broad from spiracular atrium to posterior coxa II, then narrow, extends to anterior edge of coxa II. Metapodal plates, poorly sclerotised and difficult to discern, small and irregular, principal and secondary plates separate. Anal shield 66 (66–71) long, 80 (80–107) wide at straight anterior edge, 72 (66–72) wide at level of cribral pores, para-anal 17 (16–19), postanal 24 (23–26). Anal opening broad, subcircular.

Gnathosoma  : ( Fig. 25View FIGURES 20 – 25) Corniculi poorly developed 16 μm (15–16). Chelicerae edentate ( Fig. 24View FIGURES 20 – 25). Fixed digit a thin, flat sheath, with subapical pilus dentilus and pore-like recess on apical tip. Movable digit 35 (30–35), with hyaline extension in distal third. A small hyaline flap also protrudes from the base of this digit. Hypostomal setae (h 1–3) 14 (14–17), 11 (10–13), 42 (39–42). Deutosternum with eight denticles in a single row. Capitular setae 65 long, moderately broadened at base (4–5 wide). Internal malae a simple pair of long smooth unfused lobes. Palp chaetotaxy 2-5 - 5-14, genu missing al 2. Palp tibia bearing a pair of apicodorsal solenidia-like setae that end abruptly, their tips rounded and slightly swollen. Palp apotele 2 -tined.

Legs: Leg chaetotaxy as in the majority of free-living Laelapidae ( Evans & Till, 1965)  , except tibia I has pv 2 present (2, 3 / 2,3 / 2, 2) and genu I lacks av 2 (2, 3 / 1,3 / 1, 2) ( Fig. 22View FIGURES 20 – 25). Genu IV with eight setae (2, 2 / 1,2 / 1, 0). Tibia IV with eight setae, pd 3 missing (2, 1 / 1,2 / 1, 1). Tarsus I has swollen tip bearing two prominent medioventral ventral spur-like processes ( Fig. 22View FIGURES 20 – 25). Femur I has two curved retrose spurs, paraxial 23 long, antiaxial 28 long. Femur II with ad 1 and pd 1 inserted on raised boss. Femur I pd 1 macroseta (72), juxtaposed by genu I pd 2 macrosetae with very long trailing tip (95). Genu I pd 2 migrated proximally, genu I pd 3 short, migrated laterally ( Fig. 22View FIGURES 20 – 25). Genu II pd 2 (60) juxtaposed by very strong femur II pd 1 setae (92 when unbroken) ( Fig. 23View FIGURES 20 – 25). Femur III and IV ad 1 setae spinose; 32 and 26 long respectively. Anterior spur on coxa II stout triangle 5–7 long. Anterior setae coxa I and posterior seta I –III basally inflated. All coxal setae with filamentous tips when unbroken. Many ventral leg setae have long filamentous tips: trochanter-tarsus I-II, tibia-tarsus III, femora-trochanter III-IV. Leg measurements as in Table 4.

Etymology. This new species is named after the type locality, Mt Windsor.

Remarks. Domrow (1988) clearly recognised two forms of Neolaelaps vitzthumi  . Figures of the specimens described here were labelled Ne. vitzthumi  “Mt Windsor” ( Domrow, 1988) but without further comment, while a Ne. vitzthumi  from Pteropus poliocephalus  in NSW was denoted “typical” ( Domrow, 1992). Referring to the Mt Windsor specimens in a Corrigenda and Addenda, Domrow (1992, p. 1605) wrote: “the material illustrated in Figs 63-69 has been mislaid, but may not have been N. vitzthumi  ”.

I II III IV

Femur 65 (65–67) 41 (36–42) 38 (35–38) 57 (47–57) Genu 50 (46–52) 45 (28–45) 34 (27–34) 52 (43–52) Tibia 53 (46–53) 39 (29–39) 33 (21–33) 49 (41–49) Tarsus 76 (68–76) 67 (60–67) 76 (49–76) 124 (111–124) Compared with paratypes of Ne. vitzthumi  , and other Ne. vitzthumi  material, the form from Mt Windsor differs in having two prominent medioventral cuticular spurs on tarsus I (absent in Ne. vitzthumi  ), coxa II posterior setae swollen (setiform in Ne. vitzthumi  ) and Z 5 very long,> 100 (30 long in Ne. vitzthumi  ). These features are also clearly depicted in the figures provided by Domrow (1988, Figs 63–69).

It is possible that these two forms are conspecific, as stated initially by Domrow (1988), and polymorphism was also given as the interpretation for multiple forms in Spinturnix  spp ( Domrow, 1972). However there is no evidence for polymorphism in Neolaelaps  ; indeed I know of no reports of female polymorphism in the Laelapidae  . Furthermore no Ne. vitzthumi  were co-collected with this second form, judging from Queensland Museum specimens. The second form is a readily diagnosable entity and I interpret these specimens as a distinct species closely related to Ne. vitzthumi  . Individual peculiarities of the dorsal setation identify the holotype as the same specimen depicted in Fig. 63 in Domrow (1988) and here refigured.

NSW

Royal Botanic Gardens, National Herbarium of New South Wales

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Arachnida

Order

Mesostigmata

Family

Laelapidae

Genus

Neolaelaps

Loc

Neolaelaps windsori

Shaw, Matthew D. 2011
2011
Loc

Neolaelaps vitzthumi

Domrow 1988: 931
1988