Agromyza rudbeckiana Scheffer & Lonsdale

Eiseman, Charles S. & Lonsdale, Owen, 2018, New state and host records for Agromyzidae (Diptera) in the United States, with the description of thirty new species, Zootaxa 4479 (1), pp. 1-156 : 13

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4479.1.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:93C84828-6EEF-4758-BEA1-97EEEF115245

DOI

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5997614

persistent identifier

https://treatment.plazi.org/id/03D287EF-FFAC-E446-A8E5-536B4044FB7E

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Agromyza rudbeckiana Scheffer & Lonsdale
status

 

Agromyza rudbeckiana Scheffer & Lonsdale

( Figs. 76–77 View FIGURES 75–82 )

Material examined. IOWA: Winneshiek Co., 43°26'32.50"N, 92°0'10.32"W, 17.vii.2015, em. 13.viii.2015, C.S. Eiseman, ex Heliopsis helianthoides , #CSE1995, CNC564707 View Materials , CNC564708 View Materials (2♂) GoogleMaps ; MASSACHUSETTS: Franklin Co., Northfield, 276 Old Wendell Rd. , 18.vii.2016, em. 5–7.viii.2016, C.S. Eiseman, ex Heliopsis helianthoides , #CSE2846, CNC654189–654193 View Materials (1♂ 4♀) ; OHIO: Delaware Co., Sunbury, Monkey Hollow Rd. , 20.vii.2015, em. 7–17.viii.2015, C.S. Eiseman, ex Heliopsis helianthoides , #CSE1972, CNC564733–564745 View Materials (3♂ 9♀ 1 unemerged from puparium).

Hosts. Asteraceae : * Heliopsis helianthoides (L.) Sweet, Rudbeckia L. ( Scheffer & Lonsdale 2018). The “undetermined yellow-flowered composite” illustrated by Scheffer & Lonsdale appears to be Heliopsis helianthoides .

Leaf mine. ( Figs. 76–77 View FIGURES 75–82 ) Greenish, turning brown; a blotch mine that may be compact or narrow and elongate, in the latter case following the leaf margin; frass diffuse. Scheffer & Lonsdale (2018) stated that the mine starts at the leaf apex, but this is not always the case. Up to four white larvae may feed in a single mine.

Puparium. Brown; formed outside the mine.

Distribution. USA: *IA, *MA, NY, *OH, VT ( Scheffer & Lonsdale 2018).

Comments. Scheffer & Lonsdale (2018) collected larvae from Rudbeckia in June and adults emerged after overwintering. All of our specimens were collected as larvae in July and adults emerged within a month. Larvae from all three collection sites were observed to exit their original mines and establish new ones elsewhere ( Fig. 77 View FIGURES 75–82 ). The ability to do so is common in other leaf-mining flies ( Anthomyiidae , Drosophilidae , Ephydridae ), but in five years of rearing we have observed it in Agromyzidae on just one other occasion. This was on Hackelia virginiana (L.) I.M. Johnst. ( Boraginaceae ) in Dutchess Co., New York on 22 June 2013; unfortunately we were unable to rear adults. Phytomyza ovalis Griffiths is the only agromyzid recorded from Hackelia , but it is not known to occur east of Colorado. A group of Agromyza species is associated with Boraginaceae and the New York Hackelia feeder may be one of these.

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Diptera

Family

Agromyzidae

Genus

Agromyza