Diestostemma bituberculatum

Pinto, Ângelo Parise, Mejdalani, Gabriel & Takiya, Daniela Maeda, 2017, Unraveling the white-clothed Diestostemma Amyot & Serville: a taxonomic revision of the American sharpshooters of the D. bituberculatum complex (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), Zootaxa 4281 (1), pp. 135-164: 138-139

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4281.1.14

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:DE0BD9D9-B661-43DF-90BA-4F31C4B3ADC9

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03D787EF-080A-FFE2-86DA-FC37FA73FC78

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Diestostemma bituberculatum
status

 

Key to species of the D. bituberculatum  complex

Keys to species of Proconiini  available in Young (1968) are almost exclusively based on the male terminalia. However, during our studies on this genus we observed consistent external morphology and female characters for suitable specific identification that are adopted here. The key should be used in association with illustrations and checked with the diagnoses, in addition to careful examination of the terminalia, to confirm identifications. Males of D. rubriventris  are unknown.

1. Dorsolateral portion of pronotum usually not or only slightly projected dorsally (except D. reticulatum  , D. atropuctulatum  , and D. nervosum  group, as Figs. 11–12View FIGURES 1 – 12); forewing white to brownish; distinct sclerotized dark vein areas (SDV) strongly variable from few longitudinal basal lines, four to five small rounded spots, large reticulate markings to virtually all veins and cells........................................................................ Other species groups of Diestostemma 

1’. Dorsolateral portion of pronotum strongly projected dorsally into two hump-shaped tubercles ( Figs. 1–10View FIGURES 1 – 12); forewing white with only two to three dark brown to black SDV areas at proximal 0.33, distal one large H- or T-shaped or rounded marking ( Figs. 46–55View FIGURES 46 – 55).................................................................. 2 D. bituberculatum  complex

2 (1’). Forewing with distal SDV as a large rounded spot ( Figs. 54–55View FIGURES 46 – 55); posterior margin of female sternite VII bilobed, mesally not distinctly projected, almost truncate ( Fig. 92View FIGURES 87 – 92). Peru (Madre de Dios) and Brazil (Mato Grosso) ( Fig. 93View FIGURE 93)..... D. rubriventris   

2’. Forewing with distal SDV usually as a H- or T-shaped marking, sometimes incomplete resulting in two spots ( Figs. 46–53View FIGURES 46 – 55); posterior margin of female sternite VII bi- or trilobed, usually with a distinct mesal lobe slightly to strongly projected ( Figs. 87–91View FIGURES 87 – 92).............................................................................................. 3

3 (2’). Males............................................................................................... 4

3’. Females............................................................................................. 8

4 (3). Basiventral process of aedeagus abruptly curved anteriorly at distal 0.3–0.4 forming approximate right angle (= 90º) in lateral view ( Fig. 75View FIGURES 72 – 80). Guyana, French Guiana, and Brazil (Amazonas) ( Fig. 93View FIGURE 93)........................... D. bituberculatum   

4’. Basiventral process of aedeagus gently curved anteriorly or dorsally forming obtuse angle (>100o) in lateral view ( Figs. 72, 78View FIGURES 72 – 80, 81, 84View FIGURES 81 – 86).............................................................................................. 5

5 (4’). Basiventral process of aedeagus with rami robust, slightly curved anteriorly ( Fig. 72View FIGURES 72 – 80), laterally expanded into pair of laterally flattened rami in lateral view ( Figs. 72–74View FIGURES 72 – 80); venter of abdomen noticeably realgar colored ( Fig. 37View FIGURES 37 – 45). Ecuador ( Fig. 93View FIGURE 93)............................................................................................ D. albinoi  sp. nov.

5’. Basiventral process of aedeagus with rami slender, noticeably curved anteriorly ( Figs. 78View FIGURES 72 – 80, 81, 84View FIGURES 81 – 86) and laterally slightly expanded into biconical or narrower flattened rami in lateral view ( Figs. 78–86View FIGURES 72 – 80View FIGURES 81 – 86); venter of abdomen yellowish-white to brownish-yellow ( Figs. 41, 43View FIGURES 37 – 45)................................................................................ 6

6 (5’). Basiventral process of aedeagus with proximal portion projected into an acute process ( Figs. 78–80View FIGURES 72 – 80), rami laterally expanded distally (biconical) in posterior view ( Figs. 79–80View FIGURES 72 – 80). Brazil (Rondônia and Mato Grosso) ( Fig. 93View FIGURE 93)..... D. cavichiolii  sp. nov. 

6’. Basiventral process of aedeagus without proximal acute process ( Figs. 81–86View FIGURES 81 – 86), rami slender and flattened in posterior view ( Figs. 82–83, 85–86View FIGURES 81 – 86)................................................................................... 7

7 (6’). Basiventral process of aedeagus bifurcated near base of shaft ( Figs. 81–82View FIGURES 81 – 86), rami with lateral concavities distributed along distal 0.5 ( Fig. 81View FIGURES 81 – 86). Ecuador ( Fig. 93View FIGURE 93)........................................................ D. gervasioi  sp. nov.

7’. Basiventral process of aedeagus bifurcated at about midlength of shaft ( Figs. 84–85View FIGURES 81 – 86), each ramus with large dorsal concavity at distal 0.25 ( Fig. 84View FIGURES 81 – 86). Ecuador ( Fig. 93View FIGURE 93)........................................................ D. olivia  sp. nov.

8 (3’). Venter of abdomen distinctly realgar colored ( Figs. 38, 40View FIGURES 37 – 45); posterior margin of sternite VII with mesal lobe extending distally beyond lateral lobes ( Figs. 87–88View FIGURES 87 – 92)........................................................................ 9

8’. Venter of abdomen yellowish-white to brownish-yellow ( Figs. 42, 44View FIGURES 37 – 45); posterior margin of sternite VII with mesal lobe not extending distally as far as lateral lobes ( Figs. 89–91View FIGURES 87 – 92)........................................................ 10

9 (8). Sternite VII with mesal lobe wider, maximum width at base ±0.33 of sternite width, lateral lobes extending distally to about 0.5 mesal lobe length ( Fig. 87View FIGURES 87 – 92); pronotal disc golden yellowish-brown with dark markings over mesal callosities and dorsolateral carina ( Figs. 2View FIGURES 1 – 12, 25–26View FIGURES 25 – 30). Ecuador ( Fig. 93View FIGURE 93).................................................... D. albinoi  sp. nov.

9’. Sternite VII with mesal lobe slender, maximum width at base Ĺ0.25 of sternite width, lateral lobes extending distally to about 0.33 mesal lobe length ( Fig. 88View FIGURES 87 – 92); pronotal disc pale yellow, lacking dark areas ( Figs. 4View FIGURES 1 – 12, 27–28View FIGURES 25 – 30). Guyana, French Guiana, and Brazil (Amazonas) ( Fig. 93View FIGURE 93)............................................................... D. bituberculatum   

10 (8’). Sternite VII with posterior margin strongly trilobed, mesal lobe strongly projected in ventral view ( Fig. 91View FIGURES 87 – 92). Ecuador ( Fig. 93View FIGURE 93)...................................................................................... D. olivia  sp. nov.

10’. Sternite VII with posterior margin almost bilobed, with mesal lobe slightly projected in ventral view ( Figs. 89–90View FIGURES 87 – 92)....... 11

11 (10’). Forewing with two SDV areas ( Figs. 29–30View FIGURES 25 – 30); lateral lobes of sternite VII distinctly carinated, tips slightly divergent ( Fig. 89View FIGURES 87 – 92). Brazil (Rondônia and Mato Grosso) ( Fig. 93View FIGURE 93).............................................. D. cavichiolii  sp. nov. 

11’. Forewing with three SDV areas ( Figs. 31–32View FIGURES 31 – 36, 53View FIGURES 46 – 55); lateral lobes of sternite VII not carinated, tips parallel ( Fig. 90View FIGURES 87 – 92). Ecuador ( Fig. 93View FIGURE 93)............................................................................. D. gervasioi  sp. nov.