Cebrennus rungsi ( Jäger, 2000 ),

Jäger, Peter, 2014, Cebrennus Simon, 1880 (Araneae: Sparassidae): a revisionary up-date with the description of four new species and an updated identification key for all species, Zootaxa 3790 (2), pp. 319-356: 324-326

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3790.2.4

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:BDA1931C-FEDB-4142-8A63-2765593621A9

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03DA87EF-FFA6-3975-FF69-FA6C85A51918

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Cebrennus rungsi ( Jäger, 2000 )
status

 

Cebrennus rungsi ( Jäger, 2000) 

Figs 12 –13View FIGURES 12 – 17. 12 – 13, 92– 93View FIGURES 88 – 100, 173View FIGURE 173

Cebrennus rungsi Jäger, 2000: 172  , figs 34–41 (description of male and female).

Material examined. MOROCCO: Souss-Massa-Drâa: 1 male (PJ 3391), Agadir, Hering leg. 2 November 1986 ( ZMB); 1 male (PJ 3396, SD 645), Anti-Atlas Range, Ighil, ca. 110 air km ESE of Agadir, N 30 ° 8 ' 29.98 ", W 8 ° 29 ' 6.76 ", [1584 m elev.], point 54, desert, S. Henriques leg. 29 September 2011 ( SMF); 1 male (PJ 3397, SD 646), Anti-Atlas Range, between Sdass and Ouaoufenrha, ca. 98 air km E of Agadir, N 30 ° 21 ' 14.54 ", W 8 ° 34 ' 38.96 " [1000 m elev.], point 51, desert, S. Henriques leg. 29 September 2011 ( SMF); 1 male (PJ 3398, SD 647), 1 male (PJ 3399, SD 648), Anti-Atlas Range, between Irherm and Armdaz, ca. 115 air km ESE of Agadir, N 30 ° 3 ' 17.53 ", W 8 ° 27 ' 48.96 " [1640 m elev.], point 48, desert, S. Henriques leg. 29 September 2011 ( SMF).

Description. See Jäger (2000).

Variation. Males (n= 4): PL 5.4–6.5, PW 4.7–5.5, AW 3.0– 3.9, OL 5.3–7.2, OW 3.5 –5.0; chelicerae with 2 anterior, 5–8 adnate posterior teeth, and 2–3 bristles at the posterior distal margin close to fang base. Structures of the copulatory organ correspond in most cases fully with those of the holotype. In the two males from between Irherm and Armdaz ( Figs 12–13View FIGURES 12 – 17. 12 – 13) the distal part of the embolus was distinctly shorter than that of the holotype.

Since all other characters (shape and size of RTA, shape of tegulum, reduced conductor and basal embolus, shape of cymbium) are congruent with the holotype, the shorter distal embolus is considered intraspecific variation.

Distribution. All known records (including the type locality Sous) lie in the West of the region Souss-Massa- Draâ in an altitudinal range from sea level to 1650 metres ( Fig. 173View FIGURE 173).

The following four species ( castaneitarsis  , wagae  , aethiopicus  , flagellatus  spec. nov.) have very similar copulatory organs, differentiation of the species is in some cases difficult. Apparently, the male emboli have been elongated in the course of evolution as hypothesised by Jäger (2006). The same is true for the so-called “combined morphological changes” as the elongation of the RTA or the reduction of the palpal tibia length. In general, males are easier to identify than females. Easiest to distinguish is C. flagellatus  spec. nov. (only known by the male sex) by its flagellum at the embolic kink and the distal RTA at right angles with the proximal part ( Figs 32–35View FIGURES 30 – 35. 30 – 31). Males of C. castaneitarsis  can be distinguished from those of the three other species by the shorter embolus, i.e. the arising point situated distinctly in prolateral position of the tegulum and the proximal part of the distal loop does not, or only barely so, extend beyond the tegulum proximally ( Figs 15–17View FIGURES 12 – 17. 12 – 13); moreover the RTA is as short as in C. flagellatus  spec. nov., but builds a larger angle with the distal tibia. Cebrennus wagae  and C. aethiopicus  were differentiated by Fage (1921) through the absence ( wagae  ) or presence ( aethiopicus  ) of a distal spine on metatarsus III. Although there were two of three specimens of C. aethiopicus  examined with a spination formula 3034 at metatarsus III, one had the usual 2024. Therefore, the spination cannot act as single diagnostic character. Simon (1880: 331, key) used mainly the RTA as differentiating character and his distinctions are still valid: C. wagae  has the longest RTA ( Figs 18–23View FIGURES 18 – 23), C. castaneitarsis  an almost straight RTA ( Figs 15–17View FIGURES 12 – 17. 12 – 13), C. aethiopicus  exhibits a bend at the base of the RTA (especially in comparison to C. castaneitarsis  ) ( Figs 24–29View FIGURES 24 – 29). Females of this sub-unit of the wagae  species-group are either not known ( C. flagellatus  spec. nov.) or not clearly distinguishable. However, in C. aethiopicus  the epigyne tends to be relatively ( Figs 55–62View FIGURES 55 – 62) wider than in C. wagae  (Figs 44–54) and C. castaneitarsis  ( Figs 36–38View FIGURES 36 – 43. 36 – 38). A distinct difference between the two latter species could not be found yet. Diagnoses contain a combination of characters, but few specimens ( Figs 14View FIGURES 12 – 17. 12 – 13, 39– 41View FIGURES 36 – 43. 36 – 38) show that either transitions or even new species exist, which make a distinction in some cases difficult.

ZMB

Museum für Naturkunde Berlin (Zoological Collections)

SMF

Forschungsinstitut und Natur-Museum Senckenberg

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Arachnida

Order

Araneae

Family

Sparassidae

Genus

Cebrennus

Loc

Cebrennus rungsi ( Jäger, 2000 )

Jäger, Peter 2014
2014
Loc

Cebrennus rungsi Jäger, 2000 : 172

Jager 2000: 172