Lotilia klausewitzi, Shibukawa, Koichi, Suzuki, Toshiyuki & Senou, Hiroshi, 2012

Shibukawa, Koichi, Suzuki, Toshiyuki & Senou, Hiroshi, 2012, Review of the shrimp-associated goby genus Lotilia (Actinopterygii: Perciformes: Gobiidae), with description of a new species from the West Pacific, Zootaxa 3362, pp. 54-64: 58-61

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.5281/zenodo.281643

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:43519CA9-ED40-45CD-A6C0-4D9ABB0931D1

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/E2BA41E8-BC96-4E88-A315-382B794A8460

taxon LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:act:E2BA41E8-BC96-4E88-A315-382B794A8460

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Lotilia klausewitzi
status

new species

Lotilia klausewitzi  , new species

Japanese name: Odori-haze

( Figures 1View FIGURE 1 A, 2 A –B & 3, Table 1)

Lotilia graciliosa  (non Klausewitz, 1960). Hayashi et al. 1981: 10, pl. 6; Hayashi 1984; Masuda & Allen 1987: 416; Akihito  et al. 1993:1059, 1108, fig. 7; Kobayashi 1994: 123, fig. 13; Randall et al. 1990:404, 1997: 404; Myers 1999: 163, pl. 153, fig. 5; Kuiter & Tonozuka 2001: 634; Akihito  et al. 2002:1223, 1297; Allen et al. 2003: 308; Randall 2005: 541; Senou et al. 2007: 68.

Holotype. YCM-SSP 9169, 27.1 mm SL, Yonehara, Ishigaki-jima Island, Yaeyama Group of Ryukyu Islands, Japan, 7 July 1980, hook & line (collected by T. Suzuki & H. Senou).

Paratypes. Total six specimens, 18.8–27.1 mm SL: AMS I. 19456 -084, 1 specimen, 18.8 mm SL, Lizard Island area, Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia, Nov. 1975 (collected by the AMS party); BMNH 2011.1. 11.1, 1 specimen, 27.1 mm SL, New Britain, Bismark Archipelago, Papua New Guinea (collected by Roger Lubbock); URM-P 3296, 2 specimens, 21.5–24.9 mm SL, Hoshizuna Beach, Iriomote-jima Island, Yaeyama Group of Ryukyu Islands, Japan, 8 June 1982, spear (collected by H. Senou); URM-P 34034, 1 specimen, 27.1 mm SL, collecting locality same with URM-P 3296, 16 July 1995 (collected by T. Yoshino, H. Yoshigou & Mutoh); URM-P 35997, 1 sepcimen, 23.1 mm SL, collecting locality same with URM-P 3296, 23 July 1996 (collected by H. Yoshigou).

Non-type materials. AMS I. 18039 -023, 1 specimen, 10.2 mm SL, Abaiang Atoll, Gilbert and Ellice Islands, 5 Nov. 1973 (collected by D. Hoese and B. G. Goldman); URM-P 3387, 3 specimens, 6.6–18.1 mm SL, Yonehara, Ishigaki-jima Island, Yaeyama Group of Ryukyu Islands, Japan, 30 July 1980.

Images examined (all registered in the Image Database of Fishes of KPM). KPM-NR 7101, Maeda Point, Okinawa Island, Okinawa Group of Ryukyu Islands, Japan, 5 m depth, Nov. 1994; KPM-NR 7102, same locality and date as KPM-NR 7101, 8 m depth; KPM-NR 10325, Ie-jima Island, Okinawa Group of Ryukyu Islands, Japan, 35 m depth, 10 Sept. 1994; KPM-NR 11185, Okinawa-jima Island, Okinawa Group of Ryukyu Islands, Japan, July 1996; KPM-NR 11188, same locality and date as KPM-NR 11185; KPM-NR 11236, Okinawa-jima Island, Okinawa Group of Ryukyu Islands, Japan, 26 July 1996; KPM-NR 11320, Zamami, Okinawa Group of Ryukyu Islands, Japan, 8 May 1995; KPM-NR 11321, same locality and date as KPM-NR 11320; KPM-NR 13709, Minnajima Island, Okinawa Group of Ryukyu Islands, Japan, 10 m depth, 10 Aug. 1997; KPM-NR 23374, Iriomote-jima, Yaeyama Group of Ryukyu Islands, Japan, Sept. or Oct. 1996; KPM-NR 24258, Sipadan Island, Sabah, Malaysia, 14 m depth, 30 May 1996; KPM-NR 26098, Kushimoto, Wakayama Prefecture, Japan, 13 m depth, 28 Dec. 1996; KPM-NR 26270, Kerama, Okinawa Group of Ryukyu Islands, Japan; KPM-NR 30606, Ie-jima Island, Okinawa Group of Ryukyu Islands, Japan, 23 June 1996; KPM-NR 31515, Mabul Island, Sagah, Malaysia, 23 Sept. 1992, 3 m depth; KPM-NR 32282, Ie-jima Island, Okinawa Group of Ryukyu Islands, Japan, 13 June 1997; KPM-NR 32283, same locality as KPM-NR 32282, Japan, 6 May 1995; KPM-NR 32374, Ie-jima Island, Okinawa Group of Ryukyu Islands, Japan, 21 June 1998; KPM-NR 32877, Tokashiki-jima Islandm Okinawa Group of Ryukyu Islands, Japan, 24 May 1998, 6 m depth; KPM-NR 33263, Shionomisaki Point, Kushimoto, Wakayama Prefecture, Japan, 20 Jan. 1998, 16 m depth; KPM-NR 33353, Kume-jima Islnad, Okinawa Group of Ryukyu Islands, Japan, 1 July 1999, 9 m depth; KPM-NR 33842, Panglao Island, Bohol, Philippines, 7 m depth, Nov. 1997; KPM-NR 41939, Kushimoto, Wakayama Prefecture, Japan; KPM-NR 61729, 26 June 2001; KPM-NR 68001, Miyako-jima Island, Miyako Group of Ryukyu Islands, Japan, 3 m depth, 31 July 2000; KPM-NR 68002, Shimoji-jima Island, Miyako Group of Ryukyu Islands, Japan, 26 July 1997; KPM-NR 68003, Irabu-jima Island, Miyako Group of Ryukyu Islands, Japan, 6 Aug. 2001, 12 m depth; KPM-NR 81633, Ishigaki-jima Island, Yaeyama Group of Ryukyu Islands, Japan; KPM-NR 82012, Irabu-jima Island, Miyako Group of Ryukyu Islands, Japan, 11 Aug. 2003, 24 m depth; KPM-NR 82270, Taveuni Island, Fiji, 10 m depth, 6 Aug. 1996.

Diagnosis. Lotilia klausewitzi  is distinguished from its only known congener, L. graciliosa  , in having: cephalic sensory canals and associated pores Bʹ, C (unpaired), D (unpaired), E, F, G, Hʹ, Mʹ, N and Oʹ (vs. cephalic sensory canals and pores absent in L. graciliosa  ); sensory-papillae row 4 i usually extending ventrally beyond a horizontal line through posterior end of row d (vs. not extending ventrally beyond a horizontal line through posterior end of row d); right and left sides of row n very close or joined to one another medially, with short interspace between them (vs. not close to one another, with broad interspace between them); 7 + 6 = 13 branched caudal-fin rays (vs. 7 + 7 = 14); pale area on dorsum from snout to dorsoanterior part of body relatively long, extending posteriorly to, or beyond, base of fifth spine of first dorsal fin (vs. extending posteriorly to around base of third or fourth spine); a faint, relatively small, dark grayish-brown spot at center of first dorsal fin behind third or fourth spine, and its paler margin absent or, if present, usually obscure (vs. conspicuous ocellated black spot with vivid pale margin at center of first dorsal fin, extending anteriorly beyond third spine); a submarginal row of black spots on caudal fin present (vs. absent).

Description. Dorsal-fin rays VI-I, 9 * (7); anal-fin rays I, 9 * (7); pectoral-fin rays 14 (1), 15 * (7) or 16 (6); pelvic-fin rays I, 5 * (14); segmented caudal-fin rays 9 + 8 * (7), including 7 + 6 * (7) branched rays; upper unsegmented caudal-fin rays 5 (1), 6 * (2) or 7 (3); lower unsegmented caudal-fin rays 5 * (3) or 6 (3); longitudinal scales 46 (2), 47 * (2), 48 (2), 49 * (2), 52 (1) or 53 (1); transverse scales from origin of anal fin upward and forward to base of first dorsal fin 19 (2), 20 * (5) or 21 * (5); transverse scales from origin of anal fin upward and backward to base of second dorsal fin 16 * (1), 17 * (4) or 18 (5); transverse scales from origin of second dorsal fin downward and backward to base of anal fin 16 (1), 17 * (7) or 18 (2); predorsal scales 0* (6); scales in preventral midline 2 (1), 4 (2) or 5 (2); circumpeduncular scales 20 (3) or 22 * (4); gill rakers 3 + 12 = 15 (2), 3 + 13 = 16 (2) or 4 + 13 = 17 (1); pseudobranchial filaments 5 (1), 6 (1) or 8 (3); vertebrae 10 + 16 = 26 * (5); P-V 3 /II II I I 0/ 9 * (5); anal-fin pterygiophores anterior to first haemal spine 2 * (5); epural 1 * (5).

Coloration. Following descriptions of coloration when alive are based on underwater photographs (e.g. Fig. 3View FIGURE 3 and Senou et al. 2004). Ground color of head and body blackish or dark grayish-brown; broad mid-dorsal pale or pale beige stripe, extending from snout tip to, or beyond, base of fifth spine of first dorsal fin through dorsal part of eye; two small pale beige saddles at posterior end of base of second dorsal fin and caudal peduncle; sometimes an additional small pale beige saddle, continuous with whitish anteroventral corner of second dorsal fin, present at second dorsal-fin origin; anterior narial tube whitish; anteroventral part of first dorsal fin whitish; remaining part of first dorsal fin dark yellowish-brown, gradually changing to white at distal one-half or one third of fin; a dark gray brown spot, subequal to or slightly smaller than eye, at center of first dorsal fin behind fourth spine; second dorsal fin dark grayish-brown or dark yellowish-brown, gradually becoming subtranslucent distally, with or without whitish anteroventral corner (whitish area often expanded a little onto body); anal fin dark grayish brown, with slightly paler distal margin and a small white blotch at anterodorsal part; caudal fin translucent (exclusive of narrow basal dark grayish-brown area), with 5–8 pupil-sized (or slightly larger) dark grayish brown submarginal spots; pectoral fin translucent, exclusive of narrow blackish basal area with two white spots dorsoventrally; several pupil-sized black spots at middle and submerginal parts of petoral fin; pelvic fin dark grayish brown, with a white spot around spine.

No obvious differences are apparent in coloration between live and freshly-collected specimens, except for ground color being slightly paler. Color of alcohol-preserved specimens is also similar, but the white spots on the pectoral fin are completely faded.

There are some minor variations in coloration. For example, the pale saddle on posterior end of second dorsalfin base is absent in URM-P 34034; in addition, the specimen has a fairly distinct black spot with a faint narrow subtranslucent margin on the first dorsal fin, as found in the photographed specimens in Allen et al. (2003) and KPM-NR 24258 (taken from Sabah, Malaysia) and 81633 (taken from Ryukyu Islands, Japan).

Distribution and habitat. The specimens of Lotilia klausewitzi  examined here were collected from Japan (Ryukyu Islnads), Papua New Guinea (Bismark Archipelago) and Australia. As far as we are aware, all underwater photographs, previously identified as “ Lotilia graciliosa  ” from the West Pacific [including southern Japan (Wakayama Prefecture of Honshu to Ryukyu Islands), the Philippines, Indonesia, Micronesia, Malaysia (Sabah of Borneo) Fiji and the Great Barrier Reef] can be re-identified as L. klausewitzi  , based on specific coloration. Contrariwise, all the Red Sea specimens and photographs we have examined are identified as the true L. graciliosa  . It suggests that these two species are probably distributed allopatrically. In the West Pacific, fishes of Lotilia  , presumed to be L. klausewitzi  , have been also recorded from Phoenix Islands ( Randall 2005).

Lotilia klausewitzi  lives around reef patches on sandy bottoms with rubble, at depths of 1–50 m in coral-reef moats and lagoons, outer-reef slopes, or under drop offs ( Senou et al. 2004). It is symbiotically associated with a snapping shrimp, Alpheus rubromaculatus  , and usually hovers just above the burrow entrance ( Randall et al. 1990; Myers 1999; Allen et al. 2003; Senou et al. 2004; Randall 2005). As noted by Myers (1999), this species “constantly waves its fan-like pectoral fins in an ungoby-like manner.” In Japan, L. klausewitzi  is called “Odori-haze” (meaning “dancing goby”) as its vernacular name in reference to its characteristic “dancing” behavior. Also in English, this goby is called “Dancer shrimp goby” ( Kuiter & Tonozuka 2001), as well as “Whitecap goby,” “Whitecap shrimpgoby” or “Graceful shrimpgoby” ( Randall et al. 1990, 1997; Myers 1999; Allen et al. 2003; Randall 2005; Yearsley et al. 2006).

Etymology. The new species is named klausewitzi  in honor of W. Klausewitz, who described many Indo- Pacific fishes, including the genus Lotilia  .

Remarks. A 10.2 mm SL juvenile (AMS I. 18039 -023) has uncompleted sensory canals on its head with pores Cʹ (unpaired), D (unpaired), E and Fʹ.

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Chordata

Class

Actinopterygii

Order

Perciformes

Family

Gobiidae

Genus

Lotilia

Loc

Lotilia klausewitzi

Shibukawa, Koichi, Suzuki, Toshiyuki & Senou, Hiroshi 2012
2012
Loc

Lotilia graciliosa

Randall 2005: 541
Allen 2003: 308
Kuiter 2001: 634
Myers 1999: 163
Kobayashi 1994: 123
Randall 1990: 404
Masuda 1987: 416
Hayashi 1981: 10
1981