Astrotischeria trilobata,

Jonas R. Stonis, Arūnas Diškus, Fernando Carvalho Filho & Owen T. Lewis, 2018, American Asteraceae-feeding Astrotischeria species with a highly modified, three-lobed valva in the male genitalia (Lepidoptera, Tischeriidae), Zootaxa 4469 (1), pp. 1-69: 14

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4469.1.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:42680994-585D-4230-B574-8DB398341B23

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/03FF87EA-E343-DA37-FCAC-8A89FBB6F9CE

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Astrotischeria trilobata
status

 

The Astrotischeria trilobata  species group (designated here)

Diagnostics: forewing varied, from rather dark, densely speckled with grey-brown scales to ochre-yellow, sparsely irrorated with brown or black, brown and ochre scales; the latter may form irregular, indistinct obligue stripes or blotches. In the male genitalia, valva with one, usually slender ventral and two shorter, but usually pointed and curved dorsal lobes; the latter lobes are best visible from the lateral view ( Figs. 4–19View FIGURES 4–6View FIGURES 7–10View FIGURES 11–15View FIGURES 16–19); the second dorsal lobe can be rather indistinct, variously developed in some species. Basal process of valva long or very long. Uncus short and with four lobes (two slender, longer lateral lobes, and usually rounded, shorter median ones) except for one species, A. onae Diškus & Stonis  , sp. nov., which possesses a rather long, bilobed uncus. Gnathos absent. Anellus prominent, laterally thickened (sometimes very strongly), with a few lateral setae; distally anellus usually with weakly chitinized, rounded lobes. Phallus very slender, apically widened and bifurcated. Female genitalia with well-developed prela which sometimes are greatly prolonged or in the shape of a chitinized plate proximally. Ductus spermathecae usually with a few small coils, except for A. casila Diškus & Stonis  , sp. nov. and A. selvica Diškus, Carvalho-Filho & Stonis  , sp. nov. where coils are numerous.

Currently the group comprises 11 species occurring from North America (northern USA) to South America (as far as Bolivia). All species with studied biology are associated with Asteraceae  .