Ceroplastes stellifer ( Westwood, 1871 )

Choi, Jinyeong, Soysouvanh, Pheophanh, Lee, Seunghwan & Hong, Ki-Jeong, 2018, Review of the family Coccidae (Hemiptera: Coccomorpha) in Laos, Zootaxa 4460 (1), pp. 1-62: 20

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaXa.4460.1.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:DB841017-698F-4D44-A633-461D350DC984

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/0974884C-B660-FFC2-FF6C-FF32001DF904

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Ceroplastes stellifer ( Westwood, 1871 )
status

 

Ceroplastes stellifer ( Westwood, 1871) 

( Figs 14View FIGURE 14, 15View FIGURE 15)

Coccus stellifer Westwood, 1871  : iii.

Diagnosis. Body covered with translucent, star-shaped wax with 7 rays, and lacks a distinct dorsal horn at maturity ( Fig. 14AView FIGURE 14). Dorsum with Ceroplastes  - type pores not distinct; anal plates each with 3 apical or discal setae ( Fig. 15EView FIGURE 15); and dorsal setae sharply spinose, sparsely present on dorsum except for clear areas ( Fig. 15AView FIGURE 15). Marginal setae numbering 10–14 between anterior and posterior stigmatic clefts on each side ( Fig. 15HView FIGURE 15). Stigmatic clefts distinct, each containing conical stigmatic spines arranged in a triangular area composed of about 4 rows ( Figs 14DView FIGURE 14, 15BView FIGURE 15). Venter with multilocular disc-pores present abundant around vulvar area, less frequently present on anterior area of abdomen ( Fig. 15FView FIGURE 15); interantennal setae numbering 14–20 ( Fig. 14CView FIGURE 14); tubular ducts absent; antenna 6 segmented ( Figs 14EView FIGURE 14, 15KView FIGURE 15); and legs each with tibia and tarsus fused ( Figs 14FView FIGURE 14, 15GView FIGURE 15) (partially adopted from Hodgson & Peronti 2012).

Material examined. 28 ♀♀, LAOS, Chanthabouly Dist., Vientiane Capital, 28.x.2014, coll. J.Y. Choi, on Mangifera indica  L. ( Anacardiaceae  ).

Hosts. Polyphagous. According to García Morales et al. (2016), C. stellifer  has been recorded from plants belonging to 41 genera in 22 families. In Laos, it has been recorded on Mangifera indica  ( Anacardiaceae  ) ( Soysouvanh & Hong 2016).

Distribution. All zoogeographical regions; Oriental Region ( India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Philippines, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam) ( Soysouvanh & Hong 2016; García Morales et al. 2016).

Economic importance. Hamon & Williams (1984) noted that C. stellifer  is a potential pest of citrus, mango ( Mangifera indica  ) and diverse ornamental plants.

Remarks. Ceroplastes stellifer  is easily recognized by the following morphological combination: (i) wax test star-shaped, with 7 rays at maturity; (ii) having 14–20 setae between the antennal bases, and (iii) legs with tibia and tarsus fused ( Hodgson & Peronti 2012).

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Hemiptera

Family

Coccidae

Genus

Ceroplastes

Loc

Ceroplastes stellifer ( Westwood, 1871 )

Choi, Jinyeong, Soysouvanh, Pheophanh, Lee, Seunghwan & Hong, Ki-Jeong 2018

2018
Loc

Coccus stellifer

Westwood 1871

1871