Acacia farnesiana (L.) Willd.

DeFilipps, Robert A. & Krupnick, Gary A., 2018, The medicinal plants of Myanmar, PhytoKeys 102, pp. 1-341: 76

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/phytokeys.102.24380

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/1AC1EEA8-3FDA-F213-FB3D-1C9779E54B0C

treatment provided by

PhytoKeys by Pensoft

scientific name

Acacia farnesiana (L.) Willd.
status

 

Acacia farnesiana (L.) Willd. 

Names.

Myanmar: nan-lon-kyaing, mawk-nawn-hkam (Shan). English: cassie, sponge-tree, sweet acacia, West Indian blackthorn.

Range.

Subtropical and tropical America; now pantropical. Cultivated in Myanmar.

Uses.

Bark: Sharp and bitter with heating properties. Effective against poisons and beneficial in treating abnormalities in the blood, itching and sores. Liquid from boiling the bark in water down to half used as mouthwash or held in the mouth to treat toothaches, inflammation, infections and bleeding of the gums. Also, bark boiled and a small amount of the liquid taken to treat severe diarrhea. Sap: Said to give vitality and increase virility. Leaf: Crushed tender leaves are made into balls and taken, one in morning and one at night, to treat gonorrhea. Root: A paste is made and applied to the hooves of cattle to kill or prevent an attack of parasites.

Notes.

The medicinal uses of this species in India are discussed in Jain and DeFilipps (1991). Medicinal uses of this species in China are discussed in Duke and Ayensu (1985). Medicinal uses of the species in Indo-China, the Malay Peninsula, Indonesia, and the Philippines are discussed in Perry (1980).

The essence contains alcohol, sesquiterpene, and farnesol ( Perry 1980).

References.

Agricultural Corporation (1980), Perry (1980), Forest Department (1999).

Kingdom

Plantae

Phylum

Tracheophyta

Class

Magnoliopsida

Order

ORDO

Family

FAMILIA

Genus

Acacia