Rhumosa

Hugel, Sylvain & Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure, 2018, A new genus and five new species of Anostostomatidae from the Lesser Antilles (Orthoptera: Ensifera), Zootaxa 4425 (3), pp. 511-526: 512-513

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4425.3.5

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:F11D82EC-084C-4575-8AE1-104139D6AAEF

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/22711315-BB27-FFA8-FF56-FDDABFA8FBAD

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Rhumosa
status

n. gen.

Genus Rhumosa  n. gen.

Type species. Rhumosa bolognei  n. gen., n. sp, here designated.

Distribution. Central America, Caribbean, Lesser Antilles.

Diagnosis. Rhumosa  n. gen. is characterized by: head with no sexual dimorphism ( Fig. 1 – 20 View Figure ; unlike in Licodia Walker, 1869  ), narrow, with subparallel genae in front wiew; pronotum not fully covering the mesonotum ( Fig. 3, 7, 11, 15, 19 View Figure ; pronotum extended in Apotetamenus Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1888  ); foretibia with 2 dorsal outer subapical spurs ( Fig. 21, 25, 29, 33, 37 View Figure ; typically 1 in Lutosa  , Neolutosa Gorochov, 2001  , Hydrolutos Issa & Jaffe, 1999  ); male X th abdominal tergite lobes dorso-ventrally oriented ( Fig. 44, 49, 54, 59, 64 View Figure ; as in Neolutosa  ; mediolaterally oriented in Lutosa  ), contact of the two lobes forming a long vertical suture below the hooks ( Fig. 44, 49, 54, 59, 64 View Figure ; as in Neolutosa  ; only very small contact in Lutosa  ), lobes without hooks at the apices ( Fig. 44, 49, 54, 59, 64 View Figure ; as in Lutosa  ; hooks at the apices in Neolutosa  ); membraneous area between male X th tergite and epiproct very reduced or absent ( Fig. 44, 49, 54, 59, 64 View Figure ; as in Neolutosa  ; usually extended in Lutosa  ); paraprocts reduced, with a small spine at median end ( Fig. 69, 73, 77, 81, 85 View Figure ; paraprocts very complex in Neolutosa  and most Lutosa  ); epiproct triangular at the basis, contacting distal margins of X th tergite lobes ( Fig. 44, 49, 54, 59, 64 View Figure ; as in Neolutosa  ; different in Lutosa  ); male subgenital plate with a distinct ventral carina ( Fig. 45, 50, 55, 60, 65 View Figure ; even in EtOH preserved specimens; dry Lutosa  specimens with median membraneous area on SGP can superficially appear as having a carina; Lutosa  and Neolutosa  without median carina), distal lateral angle of plate border not armed (often armed with processes in Lutosa  ), distal border of plate with two spines between styli ( Fig. 45, 50, 55, 60, 65 View Figure ; unlike Lutosa  and Neolutosa  ). Epiphallic apodemes much developed, turned inwards posteriorly ( Fig. 66, 70, 74, 78, 82 View Figure ). Female subgenital plate triangular, without emargination (87, 89, 91, 93, 95; not triangular with deep emargination in Neolutosa  ).

Description. Superficially similar to Lutosa Walker, 1869  (c.f. diagnosis). Body size average for the subfamily. Body laterally flattened; shiny, without conspicuous setae. Male and females with no sexual dimorphism except in the genital area.

Color. General coloration shiny brown, tarsi and anterior ventral angle of pronotum lighter in all species ( Fig. 96 – 100 View Figure ).

Head. Head in front view much higher than wide, as wide in ocular area as in mandibular area, genae subparallel ( Fig. 1, 5, 9, 13, 17 View Figure ). Fastigium verticis as wide ( Fig. 8 View Figure ) or wider ( Fig. 16 View Figure ) as scapus; compressed between lateral ocelli; ending variable, pointing ( Fig. 4 View Figure ), or broadly rounded ( Fig. 16 View Figure ). Fastigium frontis contacting the fastigium verticis in a narrow point ( Fig. 4, 8, 12, 16, 20 View Figure ). Ocelli well distinct ( Fig. 1, 5, 9, 13, 17 View Figure ). Carinae lateralis externa not distinct; carinae lateralis interna distinct in sideview ( Fig. 3, 7, 11, 15, 19 View Figure ). Scapus non armed.

Thorax. Pronotum not fully covering mesonotum, lateral lobes angulose between ventral and posterior borders, but without projection ( Fig. 3, 7, 11, 15, 19 View Figure ). Anterior margin more or less straight in dorsal view ( Fig. 2, 6, 10, 14, 18 View Figure ). Wings. Absent. Legs. Fore coxa with one median antero lateral spine (e.g. Fig. 1, 19 View Figure ). Fore femora non-armed. Fore tibia ( Fig. 21, 25, 29, 33, 37 View Figure ): with 1 – 2 dorsal inner subapical spurs (in addition to 1 dorsal inner apical spur); with 2 dorsal outer subapical spurs (in addition to 1 dorsal outer apical spur); with 4 ventral inner subapical spurs (in addition to 1 ventral inner apical spur); with 4 ventral outer subapical spurs (in addition to 1 ventral outer apical spur); with one oval tympanic aperture on each side. Mid femora non-armed. Mid tibia ( Fig. 22, 26, 30, 34, 38 View Figure ): with 2 dorsal anterior subapical spurs (in addition to 1 dorsal anterior apical spur); with 3 dorsal posterior subapical spurs (in addition to 1 dorsal posterior subapical spurs); with 4 ventral inner subapical spurs (in addition to 1 ventral inner apical spur); with 3 ventral outer subapical spurs (in addition to 1 ventral outer apical spur). Hind femora ( Fig. 23, 27, 31, 35, 39 View Figure ): outer genicular lobe with one ventral spine more or less conspicuous; inner genicular lobe with 1 apical spine; external surface with 11 – 14 chevron ridges. Hind tibia ( Fig. 24a, 28a, 32a, 36a, 40a View Figure ): with 1 minute ventral subapical spur after the middle; with 11 – 14 dorsal outer subapical spines; with 10 – 13 dorsal inner subapical spines. Abdomen. Laterally flattened. Without conspicuous stridulatory pegs.

Male. X th abdominal tergite ( Fig. 44, 49, 54, 59, 64 View Figure ): forming two vertical trapezoid lobes (hardly visible in dorsal view, Fig. 42, 47, 52, 57, 62 View Figure ); lobes dorso-ventrally oriented; with one minute median dorsal/proximal hook on each lobe ( Fig. 44, 49, 54, 59, 64 View Figure ); contact of the two lobes forming a long vertical suture below the hooks ( Fig. 44, 49, 54, 59, 64 View Figure ). Epiproct more or less visible in dorsal view ( Fig. 42, 47, 52, 57, 62 View Figure ); anterior part triangle shaped, posterior margin variable ( Fig. 44, 49, 54, 59, 64 View Figure ); directly nested between lobes of X th abdominal tergite, without membranous area separating them. Paraprocts ( Fig. 69, 73, 77, 81, 85 View Figure ) very small, with a minute sclerotized median projection; hidden under epiproct ( Fig. 44, 59, 64 View Figure ) or hardly visible ( Fig. 49, 54 View Figure ). Subgenital plate ( Fig. 43, 48, 53, 58, 63 View Figure ): broadly rounded or more angulose in ventral view, with a median proximal membranous area; with a distinct ventral carina ( Fig. 45, 50, 55, 60, 65 View Figure ); with small styli; distal border of plate not armed on lateral angles (more lateral to styli insertion); distal border of plate with two spines between styli ( Fig. 45, 50, 55, 60, 65 View Figure ). Epiphallic apodemes much developed, turned inwards posteriorly ( Fig. 66, 70, 74, 78, 82 View Figure ).

Female. Subgenital plate (87, 89, 91, 93, 95): triangular, without emargination. Ovipositor ( Fig. 86, 88, 90, 92, 94 View Figure ): ventral valves straight in the proximal quarter, and regularly up curved distally.

Derivatio nominis. This genus is named after the French word for rum, all species of the genus displaying the color of dark rum, and coming from a major rum-producing region. All species described in the present article are named after a rum produced near their respective type locality. We wish to emphasise that this is intended in the spirit of honouring local expertise in rum production, and the flavour of local rums, not the people after whom these rums are named (some of whom, paradoxically, may have been unsavoury characters).