Calotropis gigantea (L.) Dryand. (= Calotropis gigantea (L.) R.Br. ex Schult.)

DeFilipps, Robert A. & Krupnick, Gary A., 2018, The medicinal plants of Myanmar, PhytoKeys 102, pp. 1-341: 11

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/phytokeys.102.24380

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/360CA6E2-AE8A-3436-4E36-8B543938668C

treatment provided by

PhytoKeys by Pensoft

scientific name

Calotropis gigantea (L.) Dryand. (= Calotropis gigantea (L.) R.Br. ex Schult.)
status

 

Calotropis gigantea (L.) Dryand. (= Calotropis gigantea (L.) R.Br. ex Schult.) 

Names.

Myanmar: mayo. English: crown flower.

Range.

Tropical Asia, including Myanmar.

Uses.

Sap: Used in treating leprosy and as a purgative. Bark: Used as an anthelmintic. Bark and Latex: Used to treat skin diseases and as a vermifuge. Flower: Used as an antiasthmatic. Root: Root bark has been substituted for ipecac, especially to treat dysentery; also used in treating skin disease.

Notes.

Medicinal uses of this species in India are discussed in Jain and DeFilipps (1991). In China, the bark of the species is used as a medicine for the treatment of neurodermatitis and syphilis, and the leaves are employed as a poultice ( Li et al. 1995).

The latex contains caoutchouc, resins, water soluble matter, and a residue. It yields digitalis-like principles (uscharin, calotropin, and calotoxin), and a nitrogen and sulphur-containg compound, gigantin, which depresses the heart. Calcium oxalate, traces of glutathione, and a proteolytic enzyme similar to papain have also been found ( Perry 1980).

References.

Nordal (1963), Perry (1980).

Kingdom

Plantae

Phylum

Tracheophyta

Class

Magnoliopsida

Order

ORDO

Family

FAMILIA

Genus

Calotropis