Cascabela thevetia (L.) Lippold (= Thevetia peruviana (Pers.) K. Schum.)

DeFilipps, Robert A. & Krupnick, Gary A., 2018, The medicinal plants of Myanmar, PhytoKeys 102, pp. 1-341: 11

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/phytokeys.102.24380

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/37102D8B-7CAC-C41E-F608-8724E590B006

treatment provided by

PhytoKeys by Pensoft

scientific name

Cascabela thevetia (L.) Lippold (= Thevetia peruviana (Pers.) K. Schum.)
status

 

Cascabela thevetia (L.) Lippold (= Thevetia peruviana (Pers.) K. Schum.) 

Names.

Myanmar: hset-hnayarthi, mawk-hkam-long (Shan), payaung-pan, sethnayathi, set-hnit-ya-thi. English: exile oleander, lucky nut, Peruvian yellow oleander, yellow oleander.

Range.

South America, Neotropical. Found growing naturally throughout Myanmar; also cultivated there.

Uses.

Although poisonous if consumed by itself, C. thevetia  is considered effective in preparations for eye infections, as well as for fever, leprosy, and hemorrhoids. Bark: Bark preparations are used for fevers, burns, ringworm, and rashes. Bark, Seed: Bark and seeds are used for a purgative and heart tonic. Leaf: The extract from crushed leaves is mixed with water and cooked with olive oil until all of the water evaporates; the resulting oil is used to alleviate joint aches and pains. Leaf, Flower: The extract from crushed flowers and/or leaves is mixed with water and cooked with olive oil until all of the water evaporates, and the resulting oil is used to treat rashes and other skin disorders. Root: Root paste cooked with mustard oil forms an ointment to heal skin problems; mixed with water it is applied as an antifungal to the skin to clear ringworm infections.

Notes.

Indigenous medicinal uses of this species in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands (India) are described by Dagar and Singh (1999). Medicinal uses of this species in China are discussed by Duke and Ayensu (1985).

The medicinal uses of this plant in the Caribbean region, as well as its chemistry, biological activity, toxicity and dosages, are discussed by Germosén-Robineau (1997). The chemistry, pharmacology, history and medicinal uses of this species in Latin America are discussed in detail by Gupta (1995). A pharmacognostical profile including medicinal uses of this plant in Africa is given in Iwu (1993). The toxic properties, symptoms, treatment and beneficial uses of this plant, parts of which are poisonous, are discussed by Nellis (1997).

Data on the propagation, seed treatment and agricultural management of this species are given by Katende et al. (1995). Toxicity of this species is discussed by Bruneton (1999). Worldwide medicinal usage, chemical composition and toxicity of this species are discussed by Duke (1986). All parts of the plant contain thevetin and peruvoside which can cause cardiac arrest; peruvoside is however used in medicine for cardiac insufficiency ( Lan et al. 1998).

References.

Nordal (1963), Agricultural Corporation (1980), Forest Department (1999).

Kingdom

Plantae

Phylum

Tracheophyta

Class

Magnoliopsida

Order

ORDO

Family

FAMILIA

Genus

Cascabela