Callomyia velutina Johnson

Cumming, Heather J. & Wheeler, Terry A., 2016, Revision of the Nearctic species of Callomyia Meigen (Diptera: Platypezidae) and phylogeny of the genus, Zootaxa 4111 (5), pp. 501-554: 538-542

publication ID

http://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4111.5.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:1286E111-8C60-47AB-B2A2-36D3BFB6CA3F

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/3C7A0266-7367-972A-C2B1-2E341A43FEFA

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Callomyia velutina Johnson
status

 

Callomyia velutina Johnson 

( Figs 13View FIGURES 9 − 14, 23View FIGURES 19 − 24, 31View FIGURES 29 − 32, 39View FIGURES 37 − 40, 45View FIGURES 45 − 48, 50, 52View FIGURES 49 − 54, 63, 68View FIGURES 63 − 69, 76View FIGURE 76)

Callomyia velutina Johnson, 1916: 32  . Type locality: Mt. Washington, New Hampshire, USA.

Diagnosis. This apparently disjunct eastern and western Nearctic species is characterized by its abdominal colour patterns and male terminalia with a molar-like surstylus, apically rounded postgonite, and trifid hypandrial process. The female of C. velutina  is very similar to the widespread Nearctic species C. venusta  because of its similar thoracic and abdominal colour patterns, but differs by an extra presutural intra-alar seta on the scutum and a silverblue marking on tergite 5 that is interrupted by a median dorsal dark band (versus tergite 5 entirely silver-blue). The male of this species is similar to C. proxima  from eastern and western North America, but differs by its lateral silver-grey dusting on abdominal tergites 1 and 2 (versus more distinct posterolateral to posteroventral silver-grey markings only on tergites 3 and 4) and terminalia with a molar-like surstylus and trifid hypandrial process (versus bifid surstylus and bifid hypandrial process). Callomyia velutina  has male terminalia that are most similar to the Nearctic species C. argentea  and C. venusta  , but its terminalia differ primarily from these species by an apically rounded (versus apically truncate) postgonite.

Description. Male ( Figs 13View FIGURES 9 − 14, 23View FIGURES 19 − 24). Body length 3.6–4.5 mm; wing length 3.65 –4.0 mm. Head silver-grey with coppery reflections on gena and postgena; mouthparts brownish-yellow to light brown with palpus brown; antenna with scape, pedicel, first flagellomere and arista brown. Antenna with first flagellomere short-oval (as in Fig. 41View FIGURES 41 − 44).

Thorax mainly dark brown to black with indistinct silver-grey dusting on notopleuron, supra-alar area of scutum, posterior portion of postsutural scutum and postalar callus; propleuron, mesopleuron, metapleuron, mediotergite and laterotergite silver-grey; postpronotal lobe yellowish-brown posteroventrally. Scutum with 6 notopleural setae.

Legs brown, hind leg darker with tibia and tarsomeres dark brown; apex of femur and base of tibiae brownishyellow; coxae silver-grey dusted in most specimens. Mid tibia with median anterodorsal seta absent, median dorsal seta present ( Fig. 50View FIGURES 49 − 54); base of hind femur with long thin posteroventral seta (as in Fig. 54View FIGURES 49 − 54). Hind tarsomere 1 slightly expanded, subequal to apical width of hind tibia, length approximately 2.5 X width.

Wing hyaline with cell sc faintly yellow. Halter with stem brown; knob orange, yellow in some specimens.

Abdomen mainly dark brown to black with lateral silver-grey dusting on tergites 1 and 2; ventrolateral silvergrey dusting on tergites 3 and 4 in some specimens; tergite 7 entirely silver-grey dusted; sternites light brown, sternite 8 brown to grey.

Terminalia ( Figs 63, 68View FIGURES 63 − 69) brown to grey, surstylus darker; hypandrial process and cercus brownish-yellow. Epandrium with short tooth-like ventral lobe, pointed at apex, slightly anteriorly directed; apical process short to moderately long, pointed at apex. Surstylus molar-like, with 2 large cusps moderately excavated in between; dorsal outer cusp broadly rounded in lateral view; ventral inner cusp slightly pointed in lateral view, narrowly truncate and minutely serrate medially in posterior view ( Fig. 68View FIGURES 63 − 69). Hypandrium with moderately long apical process; process trifid, with 2 short apical projections and short stout rounded basoventral lobe. Postgonite long and moderately wide, rounded at apex. Phallus  with sharp extended hook at apex. Cercus short.

Female ( Figs 31View FIGURES 29 − 32, 39View FIGURES 37 − 40). Body length 3.3–4.25 mm; wing length 2.95–4.2 mm. Head silver-blue with occiput silver-grey to silver-brown; mouthparts including palpus pale yellow to brownish-yellow; antenna with scape and pedicel brown, pale yellow apically, first flagellomere and arista entirely brown. Antenna with first flagellomere short-oval (as in Fig. 43View FIGURES 41 − 44).

Thorax mainly black to velvety black with silver-blue markings on postpronotal lobe, entire lateral portion of presutural scutum, notopleuron, most of postsutural scutum and postalar callus; propleuron, mesopleuron, metapleuron, mediotergite and laterotergite silver-blue dusted; postpronotal lobe posteroventrally, supra-alar area of scutum, postalar callus anteriorly and anepimeron pale yellow to yellowish-brown. Scutum with 2–3 presutural intra-alar setae, usually 3 at least on one side ( Fig. 45View FIGURES 45 − 48).

Fore leg and mid leg pale yellow to yellowish brown with tarsomeres 3–5 brown; hind leg darker with apex of femur, tibia and tarsomeres dark brown; coxae silver-blue dusted in most specimens. Mid tibia with short median dorsal seta present in most specimens ( Fig. 52View FIGURES 49 − 54).

Wing hyaline with cell sc bluish-white in some specimens. Halter yellow.

Abdomen dark brown to black with tergites 1–3 yellow; lateral silver-white markings or dusting on tergites 1 and 2; tergite 4 dark brown to black, brownish-yellow in a few specimens; tergite 5 silver-blue, interrupted by median dorsal dark band (partially interrupted in some specimens); sternites white to light brown.

Terminalia with segment 8 and epiproct yellowish-brown to brown, silver-grey dusted; hypoproct and cercus yellow to brownish-yellow.

Type material. HOLOTYPE, ♂ labelled: “Mt Washington/ Betw. 1 & 2 m [hand written] N H [New Hampshire]/ VII. 24.1915 [hand written]; “ HOLOTYPE / No. [red label]; “C.W. Johnson/ Collector; “MCZ-ENT/ 0 0 304204 ( MCZ). PARATYPES: USA: MASSACHUSETTS: Chester, 5.viii. 1914, C.W. Johnson (1 ♂, MCZ) (paratype of C. velutina  , but conspecific with C. proxima  —see “Remarks); NEW HAMPSHIRE: Bretton Woods, 28.vi. 1913, C.W. Johnson (1 ♂, MCZ); Mount Washington, 6.vii. 1914, C.W. Johnson (1 ♂, MCZ), same except betw. 1 & 2 mile, 24.vii. 1915 (1 ♂, MCZ) (both paratypes of C. velutina  , but conspecific with C. proxima  —see “Remarks); Mount Washington, Raymond Path, 8.vii. 1914, C.W. Johnson (1 ♂, MCZ); Mount Washington, Raymond Path, 28.vii. 1915, C.W. Johnson (1 ♂, MCZ) (paratype of C. velutina  , but conspecific with C. proxima  — see Remarks).

Additional material examined. CANADA: ALBERTA: Bilby, 1.vii. 1924, O. Bryant (1 ♂, USNM); Fort Vermilion, 23.viii. 1961, E.L. Kessel (1 ♀, CAS); Little Smokey River and Highway 43, 11.vi. 1962, E.L. Kessel (1 ♂, CAS); BRITISH COLUMBIA: Cultus Lake Provincial Park, 6.ix. 1960, E.L. Kessel (1 ♂, CNC); Kleanza Creek Province Camp Ground, Highway 16, 31.vii. 1962, E.L. Kessel (1 ♂, CAS); Kleanza Creek, 12 mi. E. of Terrace, 14.viii. 1965, E.L. Kessel (2 ♀, 3 ♂, CAS); Liard Hot Springs, 14.vii. 1962, E.L. Kessel (1 ♀, CAS), same except 26.vii. 1962 (1 ♀, CAS); Liard Hot Springs, Mile Post 496 Alaska Highway, 1500 ’, 9-10.vii. 1959, R.E. Leech (1 ♂, CNC), same except 2.ix. 1957, E.L. Kessel (1 ♀, 1 ♂, CAS); Liard River, 8.viii. 1959, E.L. Kessel (1 ♀, CAS); Mile Post 104, Alaska Highway, 5.viii. 1957, E.L. Kessel (3 ♀, 5 ♂, CAS), same except 5.viii. 1959 (2 ♂, CAS); Mile Post 236, Alaska Highway, 13.vi. 1962, E.L. Kessel (1 ♂, CAS); Mile Post 305, Alaska Highway, 6.viii. 1957, E.L. Kessel (2 ♀, CAS), same except 6.viii. 1959 (3 ♀, CAS); Mount Thornhill near Terrace, 29.vii. 1960, W.R. Richards (1 ♀, CNC); Prince Rupert, 1.viii. 1962, E.L. Kessel (1 ♂, CAS); Smithers, Highway 16, 30.vii. 1962, E.L. Kessel (1 ♂, CAS); Vancouver, 13.ix. 1932, H.B. Leech (1 ♀, CNC); NOVA SCOTIA: CBHNt. Pk. North Mt. PG765864View Materials, 1.vii. 1984, dry spruce birch forest, H.J. Teskey, CNC DIPTERA  192200 (1 ♀, CNC); ONTARIO: Algonquin Provincial Park, Swan Lake Research Stn., Scott Lake, south end wet Hemlock Zone, 15.vi. 1995, S.A. Marshall, JSS 19226View Materials (1 ♂, DEBU); Thunder Bay Distr., Pukaskwa N.P., Coastal Trail Playter Harbour, White River, sweep, 21.vii. 2001, M. Buck, JSS 25814View Materials (1 ♀, DEBU); YUKON TERRITORY: Dawson City, 18.vi. 1962, E.L. Kessel (3 ♀, 4 ♂, CAS; 1 ♂, CNC); Mile Post 102, Klondike Highway, 18.vi. 1962, E.L. Kessel (4 ♀, 5 ♂, CAS; 1 ♂, CNC); USA: ALASKA: Anchorage, 19.vii. 1921, J.M. Aldrich (2 ♂, USNM), same except 20.vii. 1921 (1 ♂, USNM), same except 21.vii. 1921 (2 ♀, 1 ♂, USNM); Chatanika River Camp Ground, 21.vi. 1962, E.L. Kessel (2 ♂, CAS); Chickaloon River and Glenn Highway, 30.vi. 1962, E.L. Kessel (1 ♀, 8 ♂, CAS), same except 1.vii. 1962 (4 ♂, CAS); 20 mi. W. of Circle City, 23.vi. 1962, E.L. Kessel (1 ♂, CAS); Clearwater, Alcan Camp Ground, 19.vi. 1962, E.L. Kessel (1 ♀, CAS); Haines, 11.viii. 1959, E.L. Kessel (1 ♀, CAS); Johnson Lake, 16 mi. S. of Soldatna, 5.vii. 1962, E.L. Kessel (1 ♀, CAS); King Salmon, viii. 1960, M.R. Wheeler & L. Throckmorton (1 ♀, CAS); 4 mi. S. of Livengood, 26.vi. 1962, E.L. Kessel (1 ♂, CAS), same except 27.vi. 1962 (1 ♀, 4 ♂, CAS); Matanuska River Camp Ground, 1.vii. 1962, E.L. Kessel (2 ♂, CAS), same except 10.vii. 1962 (2 ♂, CAS); Mile Post 90, 5 mi. E. of Soldatna, 5.vii. 1962, E.L. Kessel (1 ♂, CAS); Mile Post 44 on Sterling Highway, 2.vii. 1962, E.L. Kessel (2 ♀, 2 ♂, CAS); Mile Post 1231, E. Tetlin Junction, Alaska Highway, 14.vii. 1962, E.L. Kessel (3 ♀, CAS); Moon Lake, Alaska Hwy. DC-1331, 8.vii. 1978, P.H. Arnaud Jr. (1 ♀, CAS); Moose Creek Camp Ground, 1.vii. 1962, E.L. Kessel (1 ♂, CAS); Peters Creek Camp Ground, 1.vii. 1962, E.L. Kessel (1 ♀, CAS); Richardson Highway, 21 mi. N. of Delta Junction, 29.vi. 1962, E.L. Kessel (11 ♂, CAS); same except 27 miles N. of Delta Junction (9 ♀, CAS); Salcha River Camp Ground, 20.vi. 1962, E.L. Kessel (5 ♂, CAS), same except 29.vi. 1962 (1 ♀, 10 ♂, CAS); Shaw Creek, 289 mi. Rich Highway, 11.vii. 1951, Mason and McGillis (1 ♀, 1 ♂, CNC); Soldatna, 5.vii. 1962, E.L. Kessel (1 ♂, CAS); 16 mi. S. of Soldatna, 3.vii. 1962, E.L. Kessel (1 ♀, 5 ♂, CAS); Spenard, 25.viii. 1957, E.L. Kessel (1 ♂, CAS), same except 16.viii. 1959 (1 ♂, CAS), same except 17.viii. 1959 (3 ♀, CAS), same except 7.vii. 1962 (1 ♂, CAS); 9 mi. E. Valdez, 11.vii. 1962, E.L. Kessel (1 ♀, 1 ♂, CAS); same except 12.vii. 1962 (2 ♀, 5 ♂, CAS); CALIFORNIA: Eldorado County, Fallen Leaf, 13.vii. 1961, J.G. Chillcott (1 ♀, CNC); Placer County, Sagehen, 22-24.vi. 1985, Malaise trap, ROM 859999, CNC Diptera  96410 (1 ♀, CNC); NEVADA: Ormsby County, 1 mi. E. Lake Tahoe, 20.vii. 1950, C.P. Alexander (1 ♀, CAS); NEW HAMPSHIRE: Franconia, collection of Mrs. A.T. Slosson (1 ♀, AMNH; 1 ♀, USNM); NEW YORK: Adirondacks, Avalanche Trail, 30.vii. 1929, A.L. Melander (1 ♀, USNM).

Geographical distribution and seasonal occurrence ( Fig. 76View FIGURE 76). Callomyia velutina  is currently distributed in both western North America (Alaska, Yukon Territory, British Columbia, Alberta, California and Nevada) and eastern North America (Ontario, Nova Scotia, New York and New Hampshire). Adults have been collected from early June to early September.

Remarks. The female of C. velutina  is very similar to that of the widespread Palaearctic species C. amoena  , particularly in thoracic and abdominal colour patterns. However, the males of these two species differ in features of the terminalia, as well as in abdominal colour pattern.

One male specimen of this species yielded a barcode ( JSS 19226View Materials) as did two female specimens, initially identified as C. venusta  ( CNC DIPTERA  192200 and JSS 25814View Materials) ( Table 1). Until now, the female of C. velutina  was unknown and was hidden within females of C. venusta  . Barcode data initially revealed these cryptic females of C. velutina  because they clustered with the C. velutina  male (<2 % genetic divergence) in the Neighbour-joining tree ( Fig. 78View FIGURE 78). Upon further inspection, subtle morphological differences were found that distinguish females of C. velutina  from those of C. venusta  , which are indicated in the “Diagnosis of C. velutina  above.

Kessel & Buegler (1972) considered four of the seven paratypes of C. velutina  to be conspecific with their new species C. liardia  (= C. proxima  ). An additional paratype of C. velutina  was also discovered to be conspecific with C. proxima  (see Remarks under C. proxima  ). These records have been added to the “Additional material examined of C. proxima  .

MCZ

Museum of Comparative Zoology

NEW

University of Newcastle

USNM

Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History

CAS

California Academy of Sciences

CNC

Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids, and Nematodes

DEBU

Ontario Insect Collection, University of Guelph

ROM

Royal Ontario Museum

AMNH

American Museum of Natural History

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Diptera

Family

Platypezidae

Genus

Callomyia

Loc

Callomyia velutina Johnson

Cumming, Heather J. & Wheeler, Terry A. 2016
2016
Loc

Callomyia velutina

Johnson 1916: 32