Amblyseius herbicolus ( Chant, 1959 )

Karmakar, Krishna, Bhowmik, Sagarika & Sherpa, Choyang, 2017, Description of five new species and re-description of two species of Amblyseius (Acari: Phytoseiidae) from West Bengal, India, Zootaxa 4311 (1), pp. 39-61: 53-57

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4311.1.3

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:63774FB4-83B7-4305-896C-3B31CE90F462

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/3D22879A-0145-7741-FF76-F9788FC6FB05

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Amblyseius herbicolus ( Chant, 1959 )
status

 

Amblyseius herbicolus ( Chant, 1959) 

( Figs 37–43View FIGURES 37 – 43, 60–61View FIGURES 44 – 61)

Typhlodromus (Amblyseius) herbicolus Chant, 1959: 84  .

Amblyseius (Amblyseius) largoensis Muma, 1961: 287  .

Amblyseius deleoni Muma & Denmark, 1970  : 68.

Amblyseius giganticus Gupta, 1981: 33  .

Amblyseius herbicolus  .— Daneshvar & Denmark, 1982: 5; Lo, 1986: 31; Denmark & Muma, 1989: 59; Moraes et al., 2004: 28; Chant & McMurtry, 2007: 78; Demite et al., 2017.

Amblyseius deleoni  .— Schicha & Gutierrez, 1985: 178.

Amblyseius (Amblyseius) herbicolus  .— Gupta, 1986: 45; 1987: 9; 2003: 18.

Female (n = 10). Dorsum ( Fig. 37View FIGURES 37 – 43). Dorsal shield 369 (363–375), long and 234 (225–243), wide with seven pairs of solenostomes (gd1, gd2, gd4, gd5, gd6, gd8 and gd9); 17 pairs of dorsal setae and two pairs of sublateral setae: j1 37 (35–38), j3 44 (42–48), j4 5 (5–6), j5 4 (3–5), j6 5 (5–6), J2 9 (8–10), J5 7 (7–8), z2 13 (12–14), z4 10 (10– 11), z5 5 (5–6), Z1 12 (12–13), Z4 101 (98–105), Z5 259 (255–263), s4 93 (90–95), S2 11 (9–12), S4 11 (10–12), S5 11 (9–12), r3 12 (10–14), R1 9 (9–10). All setae smooth except Z4 which is lightly serrated, j1, j3, are long and s4, Z4, and Z5 very long.

Peritreme ( Fig. 37View FIGURES 37 – 43). Extending forward beyond the bases j1, with two parallel rows of microtubercles.

Venter ( Fig. 38View FIGURES 37 – 43). All shields smooth, sternal shield 70 long and 79 wide at level setae ST2, with three pairs of setae and two pairs of lyrifissures; one pair of setae (ST4) on distinctly visible metasternal plate; posterior margin sternal shield clearly visible. Distances between ST1–ST3 70 (70–71), ST2–ST2 75 (75–76), ST3–ST3 79 (78–80), ST5–ST5 72 (71–73). Two pairs of metapodal shields, primary shield 22 (21–23) long, secondary shield 15 (13– 16) long. Ventrianal shield 112 (108–118) long, 54 (53–55) wide at level of ZV2 setae and 72 (69–75) wide at level of anus; with three pairs of pre-anal setae, JV1, JV2, ZV2 and one pair of large elliptical pre-anal pores. Membrane surrounding ventrianal shield with four pairs of setae ZVl, ZV3, JV4 and JV5 the latter 64 (60–68) long and smooth.

Chelicera ( Figs 39View FIGURES 37 – 43, 60View FIGURES 44 – 61). Fixed digit 35 long, with 12 teeth and conspicuous pilus dentilis; movable digit 35 (34–36) long, with four re-curved teeth.

Spermatheca ( Figs 40View FIGURES 37 – 43, 61View FIGURES 44 – 61). Calyx organ-pipe like 29 (28–30) long, flaring at vesicle and tapering gradually towards atrium. Atrium nodular, distinct with major and minor duct.

Legs ( Fig. 41View FIGURES 37 – 43). Legs IV with three smooth macrosetae with pointed tips and of the following lengths: genu 115 (112–118), tibia 88 (86–90), basitarsus 75 (73–76). Chaetotactic formula of genu II: 2 2/1, 2/0 1; genu III: 1 2/1, 2/ 1 0. Length of leg I 422 (418–425), leg II 343 (335–350), leg III 338 (330–350), leg IV 450 (442–460).

Male (n = 10). A lightly sclerotised mite with 19 pairs of dorsal setae. Idiosomal setal pattern: 10A: 9B/JV – 3,4: ZV –1,3.

Dorsum. Dorsal shield 295 (288–302) long and 197 (188–205) wide, smooth, solenostomes not distinguishable; 17 pairs of setae on dorsal shield and two pairs of setae on unsclerotised cuticle: j1 34 (33–35), j3 42 (40–43), j4 5 (3–6), j5 6 (4–8), j6 6 (4–8), J2 10 (9–12), J5 8 (7–9), z2 12 (10–14), z4 10 (10–11), z5 5 (5–6), Z4 87 (85–88), Z5 224 (223–225), s4 84 (80–88), S2 10 (10–11), S4 10 (10–11), S5 10 (10–11), r3 13 (11–15), R1 10 (8–11). All setae smooth and setae j1, j3, are long and setae s4, Z4, and Z5 very long.

Peritreme. Extending beyond level of j1.

Venter ( Fig. 42View FIGURES 37 – 43). The sternogenital shield has few lateral lines, ventrianal shields reticulated. Sternogenital shield with five pairs of setae and three pairs of distinguishable lyrifissures. Ventrianal shield 122 (120–123) long, 124 (123–125) wide at the level of JV2 setae and 62 (60–63) wide at the level of anus, with three pairs of pre-anal setae, JV1, JV2, and ZV2, one pairs of poroids and two pairs of distinguishable lyrifissures. Unsclerotised membrane surrounding ventrianal shield with one pair of setae, JV5 30 (28–35) at level of anal opening.

Legs. Leg IV with three smooth macrosetae, pointed at the tip, of the following lengths; genu 87 (85–88), tibia 72 (70–73), basitarsus 61 (58–63). Chaetotactic formula of genu II and genu III are identical to the female. Length of leg I: 352 (340–363), leg II: 254 (260–278), leg III: 268 (260–275), leg IV: 359 (355–363).

Chelicera ( Fig. 43View FIGURES 37 – 43). Spermatodactyl with an elongated shaft 18 long, terminating with a wide toe, 10 long.

Specimens examined. 23 females (Acar.lab/BCKV/5760–5785/2015), collected from Tea, Camellia sinensis  ( Theaceae  ), at Sinha Tea estate: 26° 42' 57" N, 88° 25' 24" E, 122 m above mean sea level, Darjeeling, West Bengal, on 11 September 2015. 26 female specimen (Acar.lab/BCKV/6010–6022/2015) and 14 females(Acar.lab/ BCKV/8140–8153/2016) collected from Citrus  , Citrus reticulata  ( Rutaceae  ), at Kalimpong: 27°4'25.17"N, 88°28'37.92"E, 1165.25 m above mean sea level, West Bengal, on 30 October 2015 and 20 October 2016, respectively; 6 female specimen (Acar.lab/BCKV/6023–6028/2015) and 13 females (Acar.lab/BCKV/8119–8131/ 2016), collected from Ginger, Zingiber officinale  ( Zingiberaceae  ), at Kalimpong: 27°4'25.17"N, 88°28'37.92"E, 1265 m above mean sea level, West Bengal, on 7 November 2015 and 29 October 2016, respectively; 16 female specimen (Acar.lab/BCKV/6029–6044/2015) and 8 females (Acar.lab/BCKV/8132–8139/2016)(Registration number 5440/17 deposited in the NZC, Zoological Survey of India, Kolkata), collected from Tea, Camellia sinensis  ( Theaceae  ), at Samsing Tea estate: 26°98΄61̎ N, 88°81΄19̎ E, 700 m above mean sea level, Kalimpong West Bengal, on 29 October 2015 and 29 October 2016 respectively; 8 females (Acar.lab/BCKV/6045–6052/ 2015), collected from Tea, Camellia sinensis  ( Theaceae  ), at Peshok Tea estate: 27°4' 9" N, 88°23' 51" E, 1700 m above mean sea level, Darjeeling, West Bengal, on 7 November 2015; 8 females (Acar.lab/BCKV/6053–6060/ 2015), collected from Tea, Camellia sinensis  ( Theaceae  ), at Kumai Tea Estate, Kalimpong: 26°99΄51̎ N, 88°82΄87̎ E, 900 m above mean sea level West Bengal, on 28 October 2015; 4 males (Acar.lab/BCKV/6029, 6035, 6037, 6040/2015), collected from Tea, Camellia sinensis  ( Theaceae  ), at Samsing Tea estate: 26°98΄61̎ N, 88°81΄19̎ E, 700 m above mean sea level, Kalimpong, West Bengal, on 29 October 2015; 4 males (Acar.lab/ BCKV/5767/2015), collected from Tea, Camellia sinensis  ( Theaceae  ), at Sinha Tea estate: 26° 42' 57" N, 88° 25' 24" E, 122 m above mean sea level Darjeeling, West Bengal, on 29 October 2015.

Distribution. Africa: South Africa ( Ueckermann & Loots, 1988), Kenya ( Moraes et al., 1989b), Benin ( Zannou et al., 2007), Senegal ( Kade et al., 2011). Asia: India ( Gupta, 1989), Arunachal Pradesh ( Gupta, 1986), West Bengal ( Gupta, 1992, Karmakar & Gupta, 2011 & Present study), Tripura ( Gupta, 1986), Kerala ( Haneef & Sadanandan, 2013), China, Fujian ( Lin et al., 2000), Malaysia ( Ehara, 2002), Philippines ( Moraes et al., 1989a), Singapore ( Corpuz-Raros, 1995), Iran ( Daneshvar & Denmark, 1982). Australia: Queensland ( Waite & Gerson, 1994). Europe: Turkey ( Akyazi et al., 2016), Portugal ( Chant, 1959), Spain ( Miñarro et al., 2002). North America: USA ( Chant, 1959), Hawaii ( Tenorio et al., 1985), Honduras ( Denmark et al., 1999), Costa Rica ( Denmark et al., 1999). South America: Argentina ( Furtado et al., 2007)  , Brazil ( Moraes et al., 1990), Bahia ( Nuvoloni et al., 2015), Minas Gerais ( Pallini Filho et al., 1992), Paraná ( Santana & Flechtmann, 1998), Rio Grande Do Norte (Lawson- Balagbo et al., 2008), Rio Grande Do Sul ( Ferla & Moraes, 2002), Roraima ( Gondim Jr. et al., 2012), São Paulo ( Gondim Jr. & Moraes, 2001), Amapá ( Mineiro et al., 2009), Colombia ( Moraes & Mesa, 1988), Dominican Republic ( Ferragut et al., 2011), West Indies ( Chant, 1959), El Salvador ( Denmark et al., 1999).

Remarks. Amblyseius herbicolus  is the most abundant phytoseiid mite species in the Darjeeling District of West Bengal, comprising approximately 80% of the total phytoseiid population. It is associated with major economically important crops like tea, citrus  and ginger during the post rainy season in the months of September to November. This species was observed to predate upon spider mites and hence, may be exploited as potential biocontrol agents for management of spider mites of citrus  and tea crops. Amblyseius herbicolus (Chant)  is closely related with A. largoensis (Muma)  and A. conulus  (present study) by their vase-shaped ventrianal shield but the former species is distinguished from the latter species with its typical fundibuliform or organ-pipe like long calyx of spermatheca while A. largoensis  having long tubular calyx and A. conulus  having conical or funnel-shaped calyx.

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Arachnida

Order

Mesostigmata

Family

Phytoseiidae

Genus

Amblyseius

Loc

Amblyseius herbicolus ( Chant, 1959 )

Karmakar, Krishna, Bhowmik, Sagarika & Sherpa, Choyang 2017
2017
Loc

Amblyseius (Amblyseius) herbicolus

Gupta 1986: 45
1986
Loc

Amblyseius deleoni

Schicha 1985: 178
1985
Loc

Amblyseius herbicolus

Chant 2007: 78
Moraes 2004: 28
Denmark 1989: 59
Lo 1986: 31
Daneshvar 1982: 5
1982
Loc

Amblyseius deleoni

Muma 1970: 68
1970
Loc

Typhlodromus (Amblyseius) herbicolus

Chant 1959: 84
Loc

Amblyseius (Amblyseius) largoensis

Muma 1961: 287