Mangifera indica L. (= Mangifera austroyunnanensis Hu; Rhus laurina Nutt.)

DeFilipps, Robert A. & Krupnick, Gary A., 2018, The medicinal plants of Myanmar, PhytoKeys 102, pp. 1-341: 6

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/phytokeys.102.24380

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/43A48F80-C9E0-04A5-E07F-BFA87098E6B4

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PhytoKeys by Pensoft

scientific name

Mangifera indica L. (= Mangifera austroyunnanensis Hu; Rhus laurina Nutt.)
status

 

Mangifera indica L. (= Mangifera austroyunnanensis Hu; Rhus laurina Nutt.) 

Names.

Myanmar: krek, kruk, la-mung, mak-mong, ma-monton, mamung, sagyaw, shagyaw, takau, thayet, thayet-phyu, umung. English: mango.

Range.

Tropical Asia. Widely distributed in Myanmar.

Conservation status.

Data Deficient [DD] ( IUCN 2017).

Uses.

Bark: Used as an astringent. Fruit: Ripe fruit used as laxative and rind used as tonic. Seed: Employed as an antiasthmatic.

Notes.

Medicinal uses of this species in India are discussed in Jain and DeFilipps (1991). Indigenous medicinal uses of this species in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands (India) are described by Dagar and Singh (1999). Medicinal uses of this species in China are discussed by Duke and Ayensu (1985).

Benezra et al. (1985) noted that: "People eating the fruit may suffer erythemato- vesicular eruptions of the lips and the entire face and neck … and sometimes the genitals. The peel, not the juice, seems to be responsible"; such dermatitis is known as "mango poisoning."

The chemical constituents, pharmacological activities, and traditional medicinal uses of this plant on a worldwide basis are discussed in detail by Ross (1999). The toxic properties, symptoms, treatment and beneficial uses of this plant, parts of which are poisonous, are discussed by Nellis (1997). Data on the propagation, seed treatment, and agricultural management of this species are given by Katende et al. (1995) and Bekele-Tesemma (1993). Uses of this plant in the Upper Amazon region, where some Amerindian tribes use a brew of the leaves as a contraceptive and abortifacient, are given by Castner et al. (1998). All parts of the Mangifera indica  plant contain resorcinol, an irritant to the mouth and tongue ( Lan et al. 1998).

References.

Nordal (1963), Perry (1980).