Tatia nigra Sarmento-Soares & Martins-Pinheiro, 2008

Collins, Rupert A., Duarte Ribeiro, Emanuell, Nogueira Machado, Valeria, Hrbek, Tomas & Farias, Izeni Pires, 2015, A preliminary inventory of the catfishes of the lower Rio Nhamunda, Brazil (Ostariophysi, Siluriformes), Biodiversity Data Journal 3, pp. 4162-4162: 4162

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.3.e4162

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http://treatment.plazi.org/id/58BBE846-7C9D-419E-F13B-E97823769BB0

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scientific name

Tatia nigra Sarmento-Soares & Martins-Pinheiro, 2008
status

 

Tatia nigra Sarmento-Soares & Martins-Pinheiro, 2008 

Materials

Type status: Other material. Occurrence: catalogNumber: 43876; recordedBy: Valéria Nogueira Machado; Emanuell Duarte Ribeiro; Rupert A. Collins; individualCount: 4; otherCatalogNumbers: UFAM:CTGA:14503; UFAM:CTGA:14504; UFAM:CTGA:14505; UFAM:CTGA:14506; associatedSequences: KP772596; Taxon: scientificName: Tatia nigra Sarmento-Soares & Martins-Pinheiro, 2008; kingdom: Animalia; phylum: Chordata; class: Actinopterygii; order: Siluriformes; family: Auchenipteridae; genus: Tatia; specificEpithet: nigra; scientificNameAuthorship: Sarmento-Soares & Martins-Pinheiro, 2008; Location: country: Brazil; stateProvince: Pará; locality: Lower Nhamunda River ; decimalLatitude: -1.84123; decimalLongitude: -57.07212; geodeticDatum: WGS84; Identification: identifiedBy: Rupert A. Collins; Event: eventDate: 2013-11; Record Level: institutionCode: INPA; basisOfRecord: PreservedSpecimenGoogleMaps 

Notes

Identification to species level follows Sarmento-Soares and Martins-Pinheiro (2008) based on the following characters: short post-cleithral process (about 60% of head length) not reaching vertical through origin of dorsal fin; and body colouration dark brown.

Four individuals were caught by hand from their lodgements in woody substrates at the margin of the main river (sampling site NH04). The species was also observed in rocky habitats (sampling sites NH08 and NH12), but were more difficult to catch in this situation. An example of a live specimen is pictured in Fig. 7.