Uroptychus spinirostris (Ahyong and Poore, 2004)

Mccallum, Anna W. & Poore, Gary C. B., 2013, Chirostylidae of Australia’s western continental margin (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura), with the description of five new species, Zootaxa 3664 (2), pp. 149-175 : 165

publication ID

https://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3664.2.3

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:3C634EBA-396F-4849-8626-9AF9963DF326

DOI

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.6149835

persistent identifier

https://treatment.plazi.org/id/62738786-FFF6-FF93-FF02-FB477D47F8A5

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Uroptychus spinirostris (Ahyong and Poore, 2004)
status

 

Uroptychus spinirostris (Ahyong and Poore, 2004)

( Figs. 8 View FIGURE 8 , 12A View FIGURE 12. A )

Gastroptychus spinirostris Ahyong and Poore, 2004: 9 –11, fig. 1, Uroptychus spinirostris .— Baba et al., 2008: 43, fig 1 H.

Material examined. 1 female (cl 28 mm), 1 male (cl 10 mm), Western Australia, off the Kimberley plateau (13 ° 15.9 'S, 123 ° 22.45 'E – 13 ° 16.35 'S, 123 ° 21.4 'E), 390–394 m, 0 7 Jul 2007 (stn SS05/ 2007 180), CSIRO acquisition number 0 39, NMV J 55996.

Colour. Body and appendages pale pink. Spines on body pink-red, and spines on appendages orange with white tips.

Distribution. North-western and north-eastern Australia, 364– 394 m.

Remarks. The large female collected here is more than twice the size of the original material described from Queensland, and we observed variation in spination and setation compared to the holotype. The large female from north-western Australia has more numerous spines on the carapace, rostrum and sternum than the Queensland holotype. Our large female has three pairs of rostral spines compared with the holotype which has only 2 pairs of spines on the rostrum. While the holotype lacks setae, our female has rows of setae on the dorsal spines. The smaller male collected agrees very well with the Queensland material and thus we believe these differences are allometric.