Heteroponera lioprocta , Taylor, Robert W., 2015

Taylor, Robert W., 2015, Australasian ants of the subfamily Heteroponerinae (Hymenoptera: Formicidae): (2) the species-group of Heteroponera relicta (Wheeler), with descriptions of nine new species and observations on, Zootaxa 3947 (2), pp. 151-180: 171-174

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3947.2.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:CEAB4AA5-C4F8-437E-A2F4-D82F383579C1

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/627587EE-FFE8-2A12-DEE6-FAE68F6BB32C

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Heteroponera lioprocta
status

sp. n.

7. Heteroponera lioprocta  sp. n.

( Figs 34 –37View FIGURES 34 – 37, 38– 41View FIGURES 38 – 41).

Type locality. AUSTRALIA: QUEENSLAND: Mt Elliot summit (19 ° 30 'S, 146 ° 58 'E).

Type deposition. Holotype ANIC. Paratypes in ANIC, QMBA.

Distribution, material examined. Known only from rainforest at elevations above 1, 0 0 0 m on Mt Elliot, a 1,234 m peak about 25km SE of Townsville, as follows. EA 17 (Mt Elliot): Mt Elliot, near summit, - 19 30, 146 58, holotype, paratype gyne and workers, nest under stone, 1200 m ( RWT, 4–5.vii. 1977). Summit, - 19 30, 146 57, workers, pitfall and intercept traps, 1, 150 m ( DWC, 26 Mar – 12 May 1991); workers, pitfall and intercept traps, rainforest (AG, Jan –Mar, 1991); workers, pitfall and intercept traps, fern glade (AG, Jan –Mar 1991). Northeast slope, - 19 29, 146 58, 7 workers, QMBA berlesates 723, 724, rainforest litter, 1, 0 0 0 m ( GBM & GIT, 5 Dec 1986). North Creek, - 19 30, 146 57, workers, pitfall & dung traps, 1, 0 0 0 m ( GBM & GIT, 25–27 Mar 1991.

Unless otherwise noted all samples are labeled “rainforest”. All specimens except the holotype have been labeled as paratypes.

Worker diagnosis. General features, conformation, color and major sculpturation as in appropriate key couplets above and accompanying illustrations. Gastral II spurs present as defined above and marked in Figs 34 & 36View FIGURES 34 – 37. Pronotal humeri narrowly rounded in dorsal view; humeral epaulets relatively poorly developed. Generally similar to the putatively related H. monteithi  (compare Figs). Node more-or-less rounded above; its summit extended posterodorsally to form an obtuse peak. Antennal scrobes as described for H. monteithi  , with a few additional fine punctae in the lateral scrobal areas. Propodeal declivity weakly but distinctly sculpturally margined laterally, the margin extended posterodorsally on each side to form a small propodeal-spine-like extension. Sculpturation of frons, mesosoma and petiole very distinctly less-heavily developed than in H. monteithi  . Propodeal declivity smooth and shining, lacking other sculptural elements. Sculpture of first gastral tergite resembling H. monteithi  , similarly point-punctate, but without supplementary larger punctural elements. The punctae more dense along the posterior margin of the sclerite, as in H. monteithi  . Dimensions (holotype; smallest paratype, largest paratype): TL (ca): 4.8, 0.42 +, 4.8; HW: 1.06, 0.92, 1.10; HL: 1.08, 0.97, 1.09; CI: 98, 95, 99; EL: 0.21, 0.18, 0.24; SL: 0.66, 0.60, 0.66; SI: 62, 62, 60; PW: 0.79, 0.62, 0.78; WL: 1.23, 1.15, 1.38; petH: 0.77, 0.52, 0.75; petW: 0.46, 0.37, 0.46; GW: 0.99, 0.85, 0.96.

Gyne: A single individual from a nest with workers. General features, conformation, color and major sculpturation as in Figs 38–41View FIGURES 38 – 41. Gaster less enlarged than in H. relicta  gynes. Three very small ocelli present. Gastral II spurs represented by appropriately placed small carinae ( Fig. 40View FIGURES 38 – 41). The specimen could be callow, explaining its relatively very light coloration. Dimensions: TL (ca): 4.5; HW: 0.91; HL: 0.97; CI: 94; EL: 0.18; SL: 0.58; SI: 64; PW: 0.68; WL: 1.25; petH: 0.72; petW: 0.47; GW 1.07.

Related taxa. See above under H. monteithi 

In-group sympatric associations. None known.

Biogeography. Apparently endemic to Mt Elliot, occupying a remarkably small distributional range.

Remarks. Heteroponera lioprocta  is very common in the Mt Elliot summit rainforest, where there are notably few other ant species represented.

Etymology. The name (a noun in apposition) refers to the smooth gastral dorsum.

ANIC

Australian National Insect Collection

DWC

West Chester University

GIT

Institute of Geology at Tallinn University of Technology