Ipomoea aquatica Forssk.

DeFilipps, Robert A. & Krupnick, Gary A., 2018, The medicinal plants of Myanmar, PhytoKeys 102, pp. 1-341: 54-55

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/phytokeys.102.24380

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/6E4F55BB-49E2-A836-B4F4-02496E924483

treatment provided by

PhytoKeys by Pensoft

scientific name

Ipomoea aquatica Forssk.
status

 

Ipomoea aquatica Forssk. 

Names.

Myanmar: kazun-galay, kazun yoe-n, kazun-ywet, ye-kazun. English: Chinese waterspinach, rabbit greens, swamp morning-glory, waterspinach.

Range.

Native to central and south China. Widespread in Myanmar, where it is found growing in freshwater ditches, streams, ponds, and paddy field; and is also grown as a cultivated plant.

Conservation status.

Least Concern [LC] ( IUCN 2017).

Uses.

Leaf: Sweet with cooling properties, stimulates lactation, protects against germs found in water, works as an expectorant, and neutralizes poisons. Leaves are used to treat burning, thirst, and fevers associated with urinary diseases, as well as to treat wounds caused by burns. For dysentery, they are cooked and eaten. Crushed together with equal amounts of gourd ( Lagenaria siceraria  ) leaves, tamarind ( Tamarindus indica  ) leaves, and fine rice powder, they are used to make a poultice placed above the pubic region to induce urination in cases of difficulty urinating when the bladder is full; the same poultice is used to stop excessive menstrual bleeding. Together with gourd leaves, they are soaked in water and applied to chronic sores. Liquid from the boiled leaves is taken for diarrhea and indigestion; boiled together with ripe tamarind ( Tamarindus indica  ) fruit and salt, they are given as a cure for kidney stones, as well as for all other urinary diseases.

Notes.

The medicinal uses of this species in India are discussed in Jain and DeFilipps (1991). Medicinal uses of this species in China are discussed in Duke and Ayensu (1985). Perry (1980) covers the medicinal uses of the species in China and Indonesia.

The leaves are considered a good source of minerals and vitamins, especially carotene. Hentriacontane, sitosterol, and sitosterol glycoside have been separated from the lipoids ( Perry 1980).

Reference.

Agricultural Corporation (1980).

Kingdom

Plantae

Phylum

Tracheophyta

Class

Magnoliopsida

Order

ORDO

Family

FAMILIA

Genus

Ipomoea