Microgastrinae

Rousse, Pascal & Gupta, Ankita, 2013, Microgastrinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) of Reunion Island: a catalogue of the local species, including 18 new taxa and a key to species, Zootaxa 3616 (6), pp. 501-547: 505-506

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3616.6.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:E1F586D6-28D6-445A-986F-5C08839E834E

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/714A87BB-B26B-1215-7EC4-FC18FA43FEB2

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Microgastrinae
status

 

Key to genera of the genera of Microgastrinae  in Reunion

1 Fore wing with areolet closed (r –m present though sometimes incomplete or hardly pigmented) ( Figs 9View FIGURE 9 c, 11 c, 16 b)........ 2

– Fore wing with areolet open (r –m totally absent) ( Figs 5View FIGURE 5 b, 6 c, 14 b, 20 d).......................................... 4

2 (1) Propodeum with a distinct areola, basally bisected by an incomplete median longitudinal carina ( Fig. 11View FIGURE 11 d).................................................................................................. Dodogaster  gen. nov.

– Propodeum without a distinct areola, with a more or less complete median longitudinal carina........................ 3

3 (2) Tergum 1 with a long and narrow basal mid-longitudinal groove.............................. Diolcogaster Ashmead 

– Tergum 1 without such a long mid-basal groove............................................... Microplitis Förster 

4 (1) Propodeum with a distinct areola, at least apically and laterally defined, usually with distinct costulae and often basally closed ( Figs 4View FIGURE 4 c, 4 e, 5 c –d, 5 h, 6 b, 6 e, 12 b); a longitudinal median carina may be present as a basal petiole of a complete areola....... 5

– Propodeum without a distinct areola, at most with a small apical fork, often with a median longitudinal carina ( Figs 5View FIGURE 5 f, 7 b, 11 d, 15 b, 15 d, 19 b)........................................................................................ 8

5 (4) Sclerotized part of metasomal terga 1–2 very wide, membranous lateroterga not visible in dorsal view ( Fig. 14View FIGURE 14 d)................................................................................................... Exoryza Mason 

– Sclerotized part of at least tergum 1 narrower, membranous lateroterga visible in dorsal view ( Figs 4View FIGURE 4 e, 5 d, 6 e, 12 b, 12 d, 13 b, 18 b, 18 d)......................................................................................... 6

6 (5) Vannal lobe of hind wing straight to distinctly concave in its apical half, the margin irregularly setose ( Fig. 2View FIGURE 2 a –b)..................................................................................... Apanteles Förster  (most species)

– Vannal lobe of hind wing regularly convex and setose ( Fig. 2View FIGURE 2 c)................................................. 7

(nb: some confusion is likely to occur between Apanteles  and Dolichogenidea  which are large and closely related genera. Readers should consider both entries of this couplet for borderline species).

7 (6) Hypopygium folded, medially desclerotized into expandable pleats (as in Fig. 3View FIGURE 3); ovipositor usually long (OT i usually> 0.5), sheath setose on its entire length....................................................... Dolichogenidea Viereck 

– Hypopygium evenly sclerotised, though somewhat mid-longitudinally translucent, but without median expandable pleats; ovipositor short, (OT i <0.5), sheath setose at most on its apical half.............................. Parapanteles Ashmead 

8 (4) Propodeum polished with areola reduced to a small apical fork ( Fig. 5View FIGURE 5 f); ovipositor sheath about as long as half hind femur; small species (B <2mm)................................................... Apanteles Förster  ( A. bordagei Giard  )

– Propodeum different; ovipositor size variable; body size variable but almost always more than 2 mm ................... 9

9 (8) Tergum 1 long and narrow, more than 4 x longer than wide, with a long basal mid-longitudinal groove ( Fig. 20View FIGURE 20 c); propodeum with three carina diverging from metasomal foramen ( Fig. 20View FIGURE 20 f)...................................... Wilkinsonellus 

– Tergum 1 without such a long mid-basal groove, at most with a wide basal depression shorter than half length of tergum; propodeum different.................................................................................. 10

10 (9) Propodeum rugose-reticulate ( Fig. 7View FIGURE 7 b), most often with a mid-longitudinal carina; median tergum 2 strongly sculptured ( Figs 7View FIGURE 7 c, 7 e, 8 f)........................................................................................... 11

– Propodeum most often smooth to moderately punctate ( Figs 15View FIGURE 15 b, 15, 19b), tergum 2 at most weakly sculptured......... 12

11 (10) Tergum 2 with a distinct median area enclosed by parallel crenulate grooves ( Figs 17View FIGURE 17 b, 17 d).............. Nyereria Mason 

– Tergum 2 without distinct median area...................................................... Cotesia Cameron 

12 (10) Tergum 2 with a median raised area, the area rectangular, longer than wide ( Figs 10View FIGURE 10 b, 10 d)............... Distatrix Mason 

– Tergum 2 without differentiated median area.............................................................. 13

13 (12) Tergum 1 with lateral margins sub-parallel, apically constricted, with a large basal depression; antenna of female short and stout, not reaching beyond propodeum and without median false subdivision of flagellomeres.......... Venanides Mason 

– Tergum 1 strongly and regularly narrowed toward apex, without basal depression ( Figs 15View FIGURE 15 b, 15 d, 15 f, 15 i); antenna of female longer, flagellomeres with a median false subdivision..................................... Glyptapanteles Ashmead