Ocimum tenuiflorum L. (= O. sanctum L.)

DeFilipps, Robert A. & Krupnick, Gary A., 2018, The medicinal plants of Myanmar, PhytoKeys 102, pp. 1-341: 99

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/phytokeys.102.24380

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/72CA1AE5-EB9A-4A38-60C6-BDC364C5C6D1

treatment provided by

PhytoKeys by Pensoft

scientific name

Ocimum tenuiflorum L. (= O. sanctum L.)
status

 

Ocimum tenuiflorum L. (= O. sanctum L.) 

Names.

Myanmar: kala-pi-sein, pin-sein-net. English: holy basil, sacred basil.

Range.

Old World tropics. Cultivated in Myanmar.

Uses.

Leaf: Used as an expectorant and stomachic; also, in a decoction, as a mild febrifuge and carminative for infant diarrhea. Seed: Used to treat kidney diseases. Root: Employed as a diaphoretic.

Notes.

The medicinal uses of this species in India are discussed in Jain and DeFilipps (1991) as follows: The leaf is used as a stimulant, antiperiodic, diaphoretic, expectorant; also for fever, hemiplegic, constipation, liver disorders, cough (with black pepper and rice), diarrhea, and colds; the oil for antibacterial and insecticidal purposes. An infusion is used for digestive problems. Also used locally for ringworm and earache. The seed is used as a demulcent, laxative, and for urinary problems. The root is used for sudden collapse and in a decoction for malaria as a diaphoretic. Medicinal uses of the species in Indo-China, the Malay Peninsula, Indonesia, and the Philippines are discussed in Perry (1980).

Reported constituents of the volatile oil of O. tenuiflorum  include methyl chavicol, cineole, linalool, methyl homo-antisic acid, caryophyllene, eugenol, eugenol methyl ether, and carvacrol. The mucilage contains hexuronic acid, pentoses, and ash; also, after hydolysis, xylose ( Perry 1980).

References.

Nordal (1963), Perry (1980).

Kingdom

Plantae

Phylum

Tracheophyta

Class

Magnoliopsida

Order

ORDO

Family

FAMILIA

Genus

Ocimum