Carnosaurs

Hunt, A. P. & Lucas, S. G., 1992, Stratigraphy, paleontology and age of the Fruitland and Kirtland Formations (upper Cretaceous), San Juan Basin, New Mexico, New Mexico Geological Society, New Mexico Geological Society 43 rd Annual Fall Field Conference Guidebook, pp. 217-239 : 228

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3614972

DOI

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4420205

persistent identifier

https://treatment.plazi.org/id/794487B6-D624-8613-FF46-FE07FD9DF94A

treatment provided by

Jeremy

scientific name

Carnosaurs
status

 

Carnosaurs

— Carnosaur specimens are rare in the Fruitland and Kirtland Formations. Although generically indeterminate, one specimen worthy of note is NMMNH P-20879 ( Fig. 8 View FIGURE M), a pedal phalanx from the Kirtland Member. NMMNH P- 20879 is comparable with phalanges of Tarbosaurus ( Molnar et al., 1990, fig. 6.12E) and undoubtedly represents the third phalanx of the fourth digit of the right pes.

The record of tyrannosaurids in the San Juan Basin is poor, with only one partial skeleton (of Aublysodon ) known from either the Fruit ­ land or Kirtland Formations ( Lehman and Carpenter, 1990). It is not even clear if this taxon is a tyrannosaur ( Molnar et al., 1990). The only questionable record of Tyrannosaurus is based on an isolated tooth from the Naashoibito Member of the Kinland Formation ( Lucas et al., 1987). Tyrannosaurid taxonomy is in a state of flux, as is obvious if the recent classifications of Paul (1988), Molnar et al. (1990) and Carpenter (1990) are compared. Until the family is revised and the osteology of some important taxa (e.g.. Tyrannosaurus ) are described, it is difficult to identify fragmentary specimens.

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Chordata

Class

Reptilia

Order

Dinosauria