Corvonirmus Eichler, 1944

Bush, Sarah E., 2017, Morphological revision of the hyperdiverse Brueelia - complex (Insecta: Phthiraptera: Ischnocera: Philopteridae) with new taxa, checklists and generic key, Zootaxa 4313 (1), pp. 1-443: 193-195

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4313.1.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:A5Fdfba5-F992-44A8-84C2-1756C943C19B

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/832187E9-FF4A-FF01-FF74-66AFFCE7FD54

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Corvonirmus Eichler, 1944
status

 

Corvonirmus Eichler, 1944 

Docophorus Nitzsch, 1818: 289  (in partim). Nirmus Nitzsch, 1818: 291  (in partim). Degeeriella Neumann, 1906: 60  (in partim). Brueelia Kéler, 1936a: 257  (in partim). Corvonirmus Eichler, 1944: 80  .

Type species. Nirmus uncinosus Burmeister, 1838: 430  , by original designation.

Diagnosis. Corvonirmus  is superficially similar to Hecatrishula  n. gen., expecially the He. atherae  species group, with which it shares the following characters: tergopleurites reduced, not or barely reaching lateral margins of abdomen ( Figs 130–131View FIGURES 130 – 131, 319–320View FIGURES 319 – 320); one or more fenestrae on tergopleurites, which may be perforated medianly ( Figs 130–131View FIGURES 130 – 131, 319–320View FIGURES 319 – 320); pigmentation limited; dorsal preantennal suture absent ( Figs 132View FIGURES 132 – 137, 321View FIGURES 321 – 326); marginal carina not interrupted but displaced dorsally and posteriorly at osculum ( Figs 132View FIGURES 132 – 137, 321View FIGURES 321 – 326); antennae may be sexually dimorphic ( Figs 132–133View FIGURES 132 – 137, 319–320View FIGURES 319 – 320); accessory sts on at least some segments in both sexes ( Figs 130–131View FIGURES 130 – 131, 319– 320View FIGURES 319 – 320); ppss median to pronotal spiracle opening ( Figs 130–131View FIGURES 130 – 131, 319–320View FIGURES 319 – 320); psps present on tergopleurite III in both sexes ( Figs 130–131View FIGURES 130 – 131, 319–320View FIGURES 319 – 320); tps  present on tergopleurites III –IV in at least male ( Figs 130–131View FIGURES 130 – 131, 319–320View FIGURES 319 – 320). Corvonirmus  can be separated from Hecatrishula  by the following characters: aps  present on at least some segments in male Corvonirmus  ( Table 2), but absent in all segments in Hecatrishula  ; female subgenital plate flares into cross-piece in Corvonirmus  ( Fig. 326View FIGURES 321 – 326) but not in Hecatrishula  ( Fig. 137View FIGURES 132 – 137); tps  present on tergopleurite II in female Hecatrishula  ( Fig. 131View FIGURES 130 – 131) but absent in female Corvonirmus  ( Fig. 320View FIGURES 319 – 320); as3 is present in both sexes of Hecatrishula  ( Fig. 132View FIGURES 132 – 137), but is absent in Corvonirmus  ( Fig. 321View FIGURES 321 – 326). Males of Corvonirmus  are best separated from male Hecatrishula  by the genitalia: proximal mesosome small with little or no overlap with basal apodeme in Hecatrishula  ( Fig. 134View FIGURES 132 – 137), whereas in Corvonirmus  ( Fig. 323View FIGURES 321 – 326) the proximal mesosome is large and overlaps substantially with the basal apodeme; parameral heads complicated and at least bifid ( Fig. 136View FIGURES 132 – 137) in Hecatrishula  , but rectangular and folded medianly in Corvonirmus  ( Fig. 325View FIGURES 321 – 326); mesosomal lobes splayed, not fused distally in Hecatrishula  ( Figs 135View FIGURES 132 – 137), but gently rounded, fused distally in Corvonirmus  ( Figs 323–324View FIGURES 321 – 326); parameres strongly convergent distal to mesosome in Hecatrishula  ( Fig. 134View FIGURES 132 – 137), but much elongated and gently tapering in Corvonirmus  ( Fig. 325View FIGURES 321 – 326); pst1 lateral microseta in Hecatrishula  ( Fig. 136View FIGURES 132 – 137), but central sensillus in Corvonirmus  ( Fig. 325View FIGURES 321 – 326).

Description. Both sexes. Head indented-dome shaped ( Fig. 321View FIGURES 321 – 326), but variable between species. Marginal carina uninterrupted, displaced dorsally and posteriorly at osculum. Ventral carinae typically continuous with marginal carina. Dorsal preantennal suture, dorsal anterior plate, and ventral anterior plate absent. Head setae as in Fig. 321View FIGURES 321 – 326; as3 absent; pns microseta. Preantennal nodi large, often with “hollowed-out” look. Coni typically broad but short, blunt, largely triangular. Antennae typically sexually dimorphic, scapes longer and thicker in males than in females; in some species antennae are almost monomorphic. Preocular nodi located median to eyes. Temporal carinae not visible; mts  3 only macrosetae. Gular plate triangular. Patterns of pigmentation on head often diagnostic to species level.

Prothorax rectangular ( Figs 319–320View FIGURES 319 – 320); ppss located median to spiracle opening. Proepimera slender, long, reaching around coxae II. Pterothorax pentagonal; lateral margins widely divergent; posterior margin convergent to median point; mms widely separated medianly. Meso- and metasterna not fused; 1 seta on posterior margin on each side of each plate. Metepisterna slender, median ends blunt. Leg chaetotaxy as in Fig. 25View FIGURES 25, except fI-p2 absent; fI-v4 long, spike-like.

Abdomen broad, rounded ( Figs 319–320View FIGURES 319 – 320), largely translucent, with tergopleurites and sternal plates densely pigmented. Abdominal chaetotaxy as in Table 2; accessory sternal setae may be present. Tergopleurites do not or just barely reach the lateral margins of the abdomen; often much reduced (except in Indo-Malayan and Australasian species) to small, roughly hook-shaped plates; one or more fenestrae on most tergopleurites, the median-most of which may be penetrated medianly; tergopleurites II –IX+X in male and II –VIII in female widely separated medianly. Pleural incrassations typically absent, but narrow incrassations present on at least some tergopleurites in some Indo-Malayan and Australasian species (not illustrated). Sternal plates rectangular, wide, short, not approaching lateral margins of abdomen. Male subgenital plate broadly triangular, reaching posterior margin of abdomen. Female subgenital plate roughly triangular, reaching to vulval margin. Lateral submarginal extensions or cross-piece present. Abdominal chaetotaxy as in Table 2 and Figs 319–320View FIGURES 319 – 320. Vulval margin ( Fig. 326View FIGURES 321 – 326) with slender vms, thorn-like vss; vos follows lateral margins of subgenital plate.

Male genitalia ( Figs 323–325View FIGURES 321 – 326) large, often reaching anteriorly to segment V or VI, variable in shape. Basal apodeme rounded or rectangular. Proximal mesosome large, rectangular, overlapping with basal apodeme. Prominent ventral ridges converge on gonopore. Gonopore ( Fig. 324View FIGURES 321 – 326) subterminal, open distally, with broad, scaled lateral extensions. Mesosomal lobes broad, blunt, fused distally; 2 ames microsetae on each side submedianly anterior to gonopore; 1 pmes sensillus on each side on lateral extensions of gonopore; 1 pmes sensillus on each side on lateral margin of mesosome. Parameral heads ( Fig. 325View FIGURES 321 – 326) folded, more or less rectangular, typically oblique. Parameral blades elongated, triangular; pst1–2 sensilla, central, near distal end of parameres. 

Host distribution. Species of Corvonirmus  are known only from members of the host genus Corvus Linnaeus, 1758  .

Geographical range. Global except the Neotropics. This may reflect the fact that, apart from Central America and the Caribbean, there are no species of the genus Corvus  in the Neotropics ( Madge & Burn 1999). 

Remarks. In the phylogeny of Bush et al. (2016), Corvonirmus  was represented by only two species, which were placed in disparate parts of the tree, in both cases with very low support. Thus we cannot be certain about this phylogenetic placement. Future phylogenetic analyses with additional species will help to elucidate the position of Corvonirmus  within the Brueelia  -complex.

Included species

* Corvonirmus afzali ( Ansari, 1957a: 154)  n. comb. [in Brueelia  ] * Corvonirmus argulus ( Burmeister, 1838: 430)  [in Nirmus  ] [1] * Corvonirmus hamatofasciatus ( Piaget, 1890: 225)  n. comb. [in Docophorus  ] * Corvonirmus latifasciatus ( Piaget, 1880: 143)  n. comb. [in Nirmus  ] * Corvonirmus leucocephalus  (Nitzsch [in Giebel], 1866: 365) n. comb. [in Nirmus  ] * Corvonirmus mollii ( Ansari, 1957a: 160)  n. comb. [in Brueelia  ]

* Corvonirmus perwienae ( Ansari, 1957a: 168)  n. comb. [in Brueelia  ]

* Corvonirmus quadrangularis ( Rudow, 1869: 18)  n. comb. [in Nirmus  ] Nirmus bipunctatus Rudow, 1870: 467 

* Corvonirmus rotundatus ( Osborn, 1896: 226)  n. comb. [in Nirmus  ]

* Corvonirmus saliemi ( Ansari, 1957a: 158)  n. comb. [in Brueelia  ]

* Corvonirmus tasniemae ( Ansari, 1957a: 152)  [in Brueelia  ]

* Corvonirmus theresae ( Ansari, 1957a: 150)  n. comb. [in Brueelia  ]

* Corvonirmus uncinosus ( Burmeister, 1838: 430)  [in Nirmus  ] Brueelia uncinosa plena Ansari, 1957a: 158 

* Corvonirmus variegatus ( Ansari, 1957a: 153)  n. comb. [in Brueelia  ]

[1] Ansari (1957b: 157) stated that material from Corvus corax ruficollis  [as Corvus ruficollis  ] in the Meinertzhagen collection was "indistinguishable" from Brueelia argula  . Further, he noted (ibid.: 163) that additional material from the same host species was indistinguishable from Brueelia atherae  . In both cases, Ansari refers to 20 males and 6 females. All the material we have examined from this host in the Meinertzhagen collection belongs to an undescribed species of Hecatrishula  . We assume that Ansari (1957b) inadvertently referred to the same material twice, and therefore we have removed Corvus ruficollis  as a host of Corvonirmus argulus  .

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Phthiraptera

Family

Philopteridae

Loc

Corvonirmus Eichler, 1944

Bush, Sarah E. 2017
2017
Loc

Corvonirmus afzali ( Ansari, 1957a: 154 )

Ansari 1957: 154
Ansari 1957: 160
Piaget 1890: 225
Piaget 1880: 143
Giebel 1866: 365
Burmeister 1838: 430
1866
Loc

Docophorus

Eichler 1944: 80
Keler 1936: 257
Neumann 1906: 60
Nitzsch 1818: 289
Nitzsch 1818: 291
Loc

Corvonirmus perwienae ( Ansari, 1957a: 168 )

Ansari 1957: 168
Loc

Corvonirmus quadrangularis ( Rudow, 1869: 18 )

Rudow 1870: 467
Rudow 1869: 18
Loc

Corvonirmus rotundatus ( Osborn, 1896: 226 )

Osborn 1896: 226
Loc

Corvonirmus saliemi ( Ansari, 1957a: 158 )

Ansari 1957: 158
Loc

Corvonirmus tasniemae ( Ansari, 1957a: 152 )

Ansari 1957: 152
Loc

Corvonirmus theresae ( Ansari, 1957a: 150 )

Ansari 1957: 150
Loc

Corvonirmus uncinosus (

Ansari 1957: 158
Burmeister 1838: 430
Loc

Corvonirmus variegatus ( Ansari, 1957a: 153 )

Ansari 1957: 153