Eucalyptus globulus Labill.

DeFilipps, Robert A. & Krupnick, Gary A., 2018, The medicinal plants of Myanmar, PhytoKeys 102, pp. 1-341: 126

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/phytokeys.102.24380

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/9E28DBC4-7DC8-DEBD-16EA-C0331130E0A4

treatment provided by

PhytoKeys by Pensoft

scientific name

Eucalyptus globulus Labill.
status

 

Eucalyptus globulus Labill. 

Names.

Myanmar: hnget-chauk. English: Australian fever tree, blue gum, southernblue gum, Tasmanian blue gum.

Range.

Tasmania, Australia. Grows as a cultivar in Myanmar’s temperate zone, but can also be cultivated throughout the country.

Uses.

Sharp and hot in taste, the leaves, oil, sap, and roots are used in medicinal preparations. Sap: Given as a cure for asthma, to relieve constipation, to control bloating and flatulence, and to clear the brain. Leaf: For bacterial skin infections, impetigo and erysipelas, the juice is applied topically, or the leaves are used as a poultice. The oil is also used for skin sores and infections; mixed with equal amounts of olive oil, it is applied topically to relieve inflamed or aching joints. Made into an ointment, it is used to treat burns and as a rub for asthma. Vapors from a decoction of the leaves are inhaled to relax and open airways constricted during asthma attacks. The leaves are used to treat bronchitis, fever, poisoning, whooping cough, and surgical wounds. They are also boiled to create a steam bath used as a remedy for colds and headaches. Root: Used to make laxatives.

Notes.

Medicinal uses of this species in India are discussed in Jain and DeFilipps (1991). Medicinal uses of this species in China are discussed by Duke and Ayensu (1985).

A pharmacological profile including medicinal uses of this plant in Africa is given in Iwu (1993). The medicinal uses of this plant in the Caribbean region, as well as its chemistry, biological activity, toxicity and dosages, are discussed by Germosén-Robineau (1997). Details of the active chemical compounds, effects, herbal usage, and pharmacological literature of this plant are given in Fleming (2000). Traditional medicinal uses, chemical constituents, and pharmacological activity of this species are discussed by Ross (2001). Worldwide medicinal usage, chemical composition, and toxicity of this species are discussed by Duke (1986).

Reference.

Agricultural Corporation (1980).

Kingdom

Plantae

Phylum

Tracheophyta

Class

Magnoliopsida

Order

ORDO

Family

FAMILIA

Genus

Eucalyptus