Pomaria Cav., Icon. 5: 1. 1799

Gagnon, Edeline, Bruneau, Anne, Hughes, Colin E., de Queiroz, Luciano Paganucci & Lewis, Gwilym P., 2016, A new generic system for the pantropical Caesalpinia group (Leguminosae), PhytoKeys 71, pp. 1-160 : 71

publication ID

https://dx.doi.org/10.3897/phytokeys.71.9203

persistent identifier

https://treatment.plazi.org/id/ADD17228-08E6-984C-13CB-8370836F99C1

treatment provided by

PhytoKeys by Pensoft

scientific name

Pomaria Cav., Icon. 5: 1. 1799
status

 

25. Pomaria Cav., Icon. 5: 1. 1799 Figs 39A-H View Figure 39 , 40 View Figure 40

Melanosticta DC. (1825).

Cladotrichium Vogel (1837).

Type.

Pomaria glandulosa Cav.

Description.

Small shrubs, subshrubs or perennial herbs, with a moderate to dense indumentum of simple curled hairs, sometimes also scattered plumose trichomes, intermixed with sessile, oblate glands (drying black) on stems. Stipules laciniate, pubescent, glandular, persistent. Leaves alternate, bipinnate, pinnae in 1-8 (- 11) pairs plus a terminal pinna; leaflets small, in 2-16 (- 27) pairs per pinna, always with multiple sessile glands on their lower surface (these orange in the field, drying black). Inflorescence a terminal or axillary raceme; bracts caducous. Flowers bisexual, zygomorphic; calyx comprising a hypanthium and 5 lanceolate sepals, the lower sepal cucullate, covering the other 4 in bud, and closely embracing the androecium and gynoecium at anthesis, sepals not persistent in fruit; petals 5, free, yellow, white, red or pink; stamens 10, filaments pubescent; ovary sparsely to densely hairy and glandular, stigma lateral. Fruit a linear or sickle-shaped, laterally-compressed pod, apex acute, with a sparse to dense covering of plumose/dendritic or stellate trichomes (these sometimes obscure and restricted to the fruit margin) intermixed with sessile oblate glands (drying black), elastically dehiscent, with twisting valves. Seeds laterally compressed.

Geographic distribution.

A genus of 17 taxa in 16 species: nine in North America (south-eastern USA, central and northern Mexico), four in South America (south-eastern Brazil, Paraguay, and Argentina), and three in southern Africa (Namibia, Botswana and South Africa).

Habitat.

Mainly in subtropical dry grassland and in degraded sites, many on limestone.

Etymology.

Named by Cavanilles for Dominic Pomar, botanist from Valencia, and doctor to Philip III (1598-1621), King of Spain.

Notes.

Revisions of the species of Pomaria are available for North America (Simpson, 1998), South America and Africa ( Simpson and Lewis 2003), and southern Africa (under the name Hoffmannseggia , Brummit and Ross 1974). A list of accepted species is given below, but excludes types and synonymy which are available in the aforementioned revisions.

References.

Burkart (1936: 86-90); Brummitt and Ross (1974, as Hoffmannseggia ); Ulibarri (1996, 2008); Simpson (1998); Simpson and Lewis (2003); Simpson et al. (2006).

Kingdom

Plantae

Phylum

Tracheophyta

Class

Magnoliopsida

Order

Fabales

Family

Leguminosae

Loc

Pomaria Cav., Icon. 5: 1. 1799

Gagnon, Edeline, Bruneau, Anne, Hughes, Colin E., de Queiroz, Luciano Paganucci & Lewis, Gwilym P. 2016
2016
Loc

Cladotrichium

Vogel 1837
1837
Loc

Melanosticta

A.P.de Candolle 1825
1825