Eurygeophilus pinguis ( Broelemann , 1898)

Zapparoli, Marzio & Iorio, Etienne, 2012, The centipedes (Chilopoda) of Corsica: catalogue of species with faunistic, zoogeographical and ecological remarks, International Journal of Myriapodology 7, pp. 15-68: 33

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/ijm.7.3110

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scientific name

Eurygeophilus pinguis ( Broelemann , 1898)
status

 

26. Eurygeophilus pinguis ( Broelemann, 1898) 

Geophilus pinguis  Bröl.: Léger and Duboscq 1903: 313. (1)

Geophilus pinguis  Bröl.: Verhoeff 1925a: 655. (2)

Geophilus pinguis  : Brölemann 1926: 233. (3)

Chalandea pinguis  ( Bröl.): Attems 1929: 211. (4)

Chalandea pinguis  (Brolemann [sic]): Brölemann 1930: 191, figs 312-318. (5)

Chalandea pinguis  ( Brölemann, 1898): Demange 1981: 233. (6)

Chalandea pinguis  ( Brölemann, 1898): Foddai et al. 1996: 361, Tab. I. (7)

Eurygeophilus pinguis  ( Brölemann, 1898): Bonato et al. 2006: 424, 437, figs 14-19. (8)

Eurygeophilus pinguis  ( Brölemann, 1898): Geoffroy and Iorio 2009: 685. (9)

Literature records.

General. Corsica (2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9). Epigeic. Haute-Corse, 2B - Vizzavona (1, 4, 8) [III].

General distribution.

Europe: Austria, France (Pyrenees, Corsica), Great Britain, Italy (Alps), Spain (Pyrenees, Cantabrians Mts), Slovenia ( Bonato et al. 2006).

Chorotype.

European.

Ecological notes.

No records; in northern Italy populations mostly inhabit submontane and montane woodlands, as the species has been recorded from 750 to 1650 m, in mixed broadleaved woodlands, in beechwoods and in Larix decidua  and Pinus cembra  woodlands ( Minelli and Iovane 1987, Zapparoli 1993); associated with deciduous woodland in Great Britain ( Barber 2009). The sole locality known in Corsica seems to fall in the Montane belt.

Remarks.

Only known from a female 17 mm long with 45 leg pairs from Vizzavona ( Léger and Duboscq 1903). The record is considered reliable by Bonato et al. (2006).