Ficus religiosa L.

DeFilipps, Robert A. & Krupnick, Gary A., 2018, The medicinal plants of Myanmar, PhytoKeys 102, pp. 1-341: 123-124

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/phytokeys.102.24380

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/B785AC26-C8EA-000A-486A-F2F31FC799D2

treatment provided by

PhytoKeys by Pensoft

scientific name

Ficus religiosa L.
status

 

Ficus religiosa L. 

Names.

Myanmar: nyaung bokdahae, bodhi nyaung, lagat (Kachin), mai-nyawng (Shan), nyaung-bawdi. English: bo tree, sacred fig tree.

Range.

Tropical Asia. Grows naturally throughout Myanmar; also cultivated there.

Uses.

Whole plant: Bitter and astringent in taste with cooling properties, drying, and difficult to digest; the bark, roots, fruits, leaves, and sap are known for bringing out brilliance in complexion, cleansing the uterus, and controlling bile and phlegm as well as alleviating heat-induced illnesses, sores, asthma, leprosy, plague, and fistulas. Sap: Used to treat female-related disorders. Bark: Considered binding, promotes weight gain. A decoction of bark- reduced to one-half the starting volume is taken for many skin problems, rashes, and itching; also used as a mouthwash to cure tooth diseases. Dried and powdered inner bark is applied to fistulae to stimulate healing and new tissue formation. Ash from the bark is sprinkled onto genital sores caused by venereal diseases to promote drying and healing; ash from young bark filtered through fine cloth is rubbed on chronic sores to expedite healing. Bark is also used in medicines to treat burns, breast problems, lock-jaw, and snakebites in animals. Sap: Used to alleviate toothaches and gum pain. Sap and Leaf: An anti-emetic. Used to cleanse the blood; also used in preparations to treat boils in the groin, hemorrhaging, and cracked tongues and lips. A decoction of the leaves with jaggery is taken for fatigue to promote strength and well-being. A mixture of the juice from the crushed leaves and the sap is applied topically to treat cracks in the feet. Fruit: The ripe fruit, which has cooling properties, is considered beneficial for the heart. It is used to treat blood diseases, “heat” or bile conditions, nausea, lung infections, and loss of appetite. A mixture of the crushed dried fruit and water is taken for asthma and bronchitis. Root: The root bark is stewed in water, reduced to one-half the start ing volume, and given for herpes infections. The roots are ground to form a paste applied topically as a remedy for leprosy and other sores. A root decoction with rock salt is taken to alleviate asthma and congestion. A mixture of the root powder and ginger powder is given for diseases involving gas, asthma, coughing, nausea; also to treat elephantiasis.

Notes.

The medicinal uses of this species in India are discussed in Jain and DeFilipps (1991). Medicinal uses of this species in China are discussed in Duke and Ayensu (1985).

References.

Nordal (1963), Agricultural Corporation (1980).

Kingdom

Plantae

Phylum

Mollusca

Class

Gastropoda

Order

ORDO

Family

FAMILIA

Genus

Ficus