Pericharax vallii , Leocorny, Pedro, Alencar, Aline, Fromont, Jane & Klautau, Michelle, 2016

Leocorny, Pedro, Alencar, Aline, Fromont, Jane & Klautau, Michelle, 2016, New Leucettidae de Laubenfels, 1936 (Porifera, Calcarea) from Western Australia, Zootaxa 4175 (4), pp. 319-334: 328-331

publication ID

http://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4175.4.2

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:9052926E-1A4A-4CBC-B7FB-AA3B49577731

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/C06287E2-FFDF-FFAC-819C-878814A2D76B

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Pericharax vallii
status

sp. nov.

Pericharax vallii  sp. nov.

Etymology. From the Latin noun vallus (=stake, palisade), for the conspicuous hispid atrial cavity of the species. Diagnosis. Pericharax  with conspicuous oscula surrounded by huge tripods and a hispid atrial cavity with a palisade arrangement of apical actines. Skeleton composed of tripods, one category of triactine and two categories of tetractines.

Type material. Holotype, WAMAbout WAM Z45632View Materials; from 34º03’00”S, 122º38’00”E Twin Peak, Recherche Archipelago , Western AustraliaGoogleMaps  ; station: TPEV; depth: 15 meters. Fragment from Holotype deposited under UFRJPOR 7126. Paratype, WAMAbout WAM Z40489View Materials; from 29º18.85”S, 114º54.07”E Jack Reef, Dongara , Western AustraliaGoogleMaps  ; station: JWAM31/T1; depth: 6.5 meters; collectors: Fromont, J.; Whisson, C. S. & Moore, G. I.; Date 15/March/2006. Fragment from Paratype deposited under UFRJPOR 7271.

Type locality. Twin Peak , Recherche Archipelago, Western Australia, Australia. 

Additional Material Analysed. WAMAbout WAM Z45626View Materials =UFRJPOR 7125, from the same locality as the holotype, but station TPEH  ; WAMAbout WAM Z40348View Materials =UFRJPOR 7742, from the same locality as the paratype, but station JWAM 31 /Q3. 

Description. Sponge beige in ethanol, massive (5.7 cm x 5.7 cm), with a conspicuous osculum apically (1 cm in diameter) ( Figure 5View FIGURE 5 A). The surface is irregular and rough to the touch. The atrial cavity is large and conspicuously hispid ( Figure 5View FIGURE 5 B). The aquiferous system is leuconoid.

The skeleton is disorganized. The cortical skeleton is composed of huge tripods and triactines with the tripods mainly concentrated near the osculum ( Figures 5View FIGURE 5 A, 5C). Subcortical lacunae are present. The choanosomal skeleton is composed of triactines and tetractines I. The tetractines I mainly surround the inhalant canals with their apical actines pointing inwards ( Figures 5View FIGURE 5 D, 5E). Exhalant canals are hispid and surrounded by tetractines II ( Figure 5View FIGURE 5 F). The atrial skeleton is principally composed of tetractines II forming a conspicuous palisade of apical actines (i.e. a perpendicular arrangement of the apical actines) in the atrial cavity ( Figure 5View FIGURE 5 F, 5B).

Spicules. ( Table 6). Tripods ( Figure 5View FIGURE 5 G): regular or subregular (actines with different lengths). Actines are stout and conical with blunt (sometimes rounded) tips (400–798–1050 µm / 150–237–350 µm).

Length (µm) Width (µm)

Spicule Actine Min Mean sd Max Min Mean sd Max n Tripods

WAMAbout WAM Z45632View Materials (H) 450.0 611.0 88.1 700.0 220.0 257.0 21.1 290.0 10 WAMAbout WAM Z40489View Materials (P) 500.0 798.0 151.2 1050.0 150.0 236.8 37.5 350.0 20 Triactines

WAMAbout WAM Z45632View Materials (H) 87.5 118.3 12.3 137.5 12.5 16.8 1.8 20.0 20 WAMAbout WAM Z40489View Materials (P) 97.2 124.9 16.8 165.2 12.2 14.9 2.1 19.4 20 Tetractines I Basal

WAMAbout WAM Z45632View Materials (H) 92.5 116.9 17.8 150.0 11.2 14.4 1.7 17.5 20 WAMAbout WAM Z40489View Materials (P) 94.8 122.1 15.5 170.1 9.7 14.1 2.1 21.9 20

Apical

WAMAbout WAM Z45632View Materials (H) 37.5 60.6 13.4 100.0 5.0 5.8 1.0 7.5 20 WAMAbout WAM Z40489View Materials (P) 15.0 34.3 18.5 87.5 2.5 5.5 1.2 7.5 20 Tetractines II Basal

WAMAbout WAM Z45632View Materials (H) 100.0 144.7 18.3 175.0 17.5 20.9 3.2 27.5 20 WAMAbout WAM Z40489View Materials (P) 120.0 164.7 19.4 200.0 15.0 17.0 1.8 20.0 20

Apical

WAMAbout WAM Z45632View Materials (H) 285.0 422.7 73.7 545.0 25.0 39.2 8.4 55.0 20 WAMAbout WAM Z40489View Materials (P) 280.0 475.5 91.0 725.0 17.5 22.6 2.0 25.0 20 Triactines ( Figure 5View FIGURE 5 H): regular. Actines are conical with sharp tips (88–144–170 µm / 12–18–22 µm). Tetractines I ( Figure 5View FIGURE 5 I, left): regular. The basal actines are conical with sharp tips. The apical actines are slightly conical and curved with sharp tips (basal: 97–125–163 µm / 10–14–22 µm; apical: 15–61–100 µm / 3–6–8 µm).

Tetractines II ( Figure 5View FIGURE 5 I, right): regular or subregular. The basal actines are conical and undulating with blunt tips. The apical actines are conical, thicker and longer than the apical actines of tetractine I, with sharp tips and a conspicuous constriction at the base (basal: 100–165–200 µm / 15–21–28 µm; apical: 280–476–725 µm / 18–39– 55 µm).

Remarks. No species of Pericharax  had previously been reported with tripods although there are two species of Leucetta  with this kind of spicule: L. insignis Row & Hôzawa, 1931  and L. prolifera ( Carter, 1878)  . However, the tripods of these two species are much shorter and thinner than those of P. vallii  sp. nov. ( L. insignis  : 200-260/ 30-60 µm; L. prolifera  : 263-578/32-63 µm; P. vallii  : 611-798/237-257 µm). In addition L. prolifera  has tetrapods not seen in P. vallii  sp. nov. The new species is also distinguished from all other Pericharax  and Leucetta  species by the presence of a palisade of apical actines in the atrial skeleton.

WAM

Western Australian Museum