Tectocepheidae Grandjean, 1954

Fischer, Barbara M. & Schatz, Heinrich, 2013, Biodiversity of oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida) along an altitudinal gradient in the Central Alps, Zootaxa 3626 (4), pp. 429-454: 440-441

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3626.4.2

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:6D8C178A-C46B-4595-84F5-9D732CBAF7C8

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/D55C878B-992B-B526-FF0D-330F5C4B1195

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Plazi

scientific name

Tectocepheidae Grandjean, 1954
status

 

Tectocepheidae Grandjean, 1954 

Tectocepheus velatus sarekensis Trägårdh, 1910 

Distribution: semicosmopolitan: Holarctic, Oriental and Ethiopian regions, Central America, Australia and Pacific

Habitat: euryoecious species

Obergurgl area: This species has been recorded in all investigated sites: pine forest at 2050 m (Zirbenwald), Nardetum at 2300 m (Schönwieskopf), Caricetum at 2600 m (Hohe Mut), Androsacetum alpinae at 2900 m (Liebener Rippe); previous studies: 1960–1980 m (hay meadows), pine forest at 2050 m (Zirbenwald), 2100–2190 m (dwarf shrub community), 2250–2340 m (alpine meadows with lichen communities), 2500 m (scree slope), 2550–2650 m (alpine meadows), 2800–3100 m (Androsacetum alpinae)

Taxonomic remark: The taxonomic rank and position of “ T velatus  . sarekensis  ” is still unclear. Tectocepheus  species are primarily parthenogenetic. Nübel-Reidelbach (1994) lumped together the characters of different and heterogeneous populations, and she postulated all studied populations—except of T. minor  —as members of one large and polymorphic species, T. velatus  . Weigmann (2002) studied morphological differences between different populations and distinguished distinct groups, tentatively ranked at subspecific level (also in Weigmann 2006). Based on molecular analyses of nucleotide sequences, Laumann et al. (2007) suggested that the different morphotypes of Tectocepheus  evolved in absence of sexual reproduction, and that T. minor  , T. velatus  and T. sarekensis  are best considered as distinct species.

Tectocepheus velatus tenuis Knülle, 1954 

Distribution: Germany, Czech Republic, European Russia, Central Asia

Habitat: rather dry and sandy dune areas and heath

Obergurgl area: pine forest at 2050 m (Zirbenwald), Nardetum at 2300 m (Schönwieskopf), Caricetum at 2600 m (Hohe Mut)

Remark: See T. velatus sarekensis 

Tectocepheus velatus velatus (Michael, 1880) 

Distribution: almost cosmopolitan, including Antarctic and Subantarctic Islands

Habitat: undifferentiated, euryoecious species

Obergurgl area: 2050 m (Zirbenwald), Nardetum at 2300 m (Schönwieskopf); previous studies: 2190 m (dwarf shrub community), 2250–2340 m (alpine meadows with lichen communities), 2500 m (scree slope), 2550–2650 m (alpine meadows), 2800–3100 m (Androsacetum alpinae)

Remark: See T. velatus sarekensis 

Tectocepheus  sp.

Obergurgl area: Caricetum at 2600 m (Hohe Mut)

Remark: The most evident character of this species is the pointed and long lamellar cusp which protrudes beyond the prodorsum. The space between the lamellar cusps is depressed and typically longitudinally striped. The notogaster shows three pairs of notogastral depressions between the pteromorphs. This species is apparently new to science and has also been found in Northern Italy—Prov. Bolzano (Fischer & Schatz 2007; Schatz 2008); it seems to be restricted to alpine regions. A description is in preparation.