Piper betle L.

DeFilipps, Robert A. & Krupnick, Gary A., 2018, The medicinal plants of Myanmar, PhytoKeys 102, pp. 1-341: 136

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/phytokeys.102.24380

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/D72510E2-03EF-F3DD-F17B-AF8D0DBB700B

treatment provided by

PhytoKeys by Pensoft

scientific name

Piper betle L.
status

 

Piper betle L. 

Names.

Myanmar: kun, pu (Shan), bu, buru (Kachin). English: betel, betel pepper, betel vine.

Range.

Old World tropics.

Uses.

Leaf: Bitter, astringent, and hot in taste, known for whetting the appetite, reducing phlegm, controlling flatulence, promoting vitality and virility, neutralizing poison, supporting heart and bowel functions, and curing coughs and heart disease. Children are given a mixture of honey and the juice from the crushed leaves to alleviate indigestion, gas, diarrhea, fevers, and other illnesses. Juice from crushed leaves is taken with milk as a remedy for emotional distress related to the menstrual cycle. A mixture of the juice from the crushed leaves, rock salt, and a decoction of ginger is used for asthma, chest pain, indigestion, and whooping cough. The juice from the crushed leaves is applied as eyedrops for night blindness, sore or inflamed eyes, and other eye problems. A leaf decoction made with turmeric and a bit of salt is taken for fevers and illnesses. Roasted until limp but not dry, leaves or applied with coconut oil in compresses on the soft spots of children’s heads to cure runny noses. A decoction of the leaves with jaggery and salt is taken for fever caused by heat stroke.

Notes.

The medicinal uses of this species in India are discussed in Jain and DeFilipps (1991). Medicinal uses of this species in China are discussed in Duke and Ayensu (1985).

Reference.

Agricultural Corporation (1980).

Kingdom

Plantae

Phylum

Tracheophyta

Class

Magnoliopsida

Order

ORDO

Family

FAMILIA

Genus

Piper