Hyperlasion aliens Mohrig, 2004

Broadley, Adam, Kauschke, Ellen & Mohrig, Werner, 2018, Black fungus gnats (Diptera: Sciaridae) found in association with cultivated plants and mushrooms in Australia, with notes on cosmopolitan pest species and biosecurity interceptions, Zootaxa 4415 (2), pp. 201-242: 232-233

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4415.2.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:41DE1572-F169-4177-B375-D806682534F6

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/DA1B8F1B-E714-FFE6-FF51-F885FCC90D35

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Hyperlasion aliens Mohrig, 2004
status

 

Hyperlasion aliens Mohrig, 2004 

( Fig. 18A –CView FIGURE18)

Hyperlasion aliens Mohrig, 2004  [Mohrig (2004): 159–160, fig. 27 a –f].

Literature: Menzel & Smith (2009): 38–40, figs 39–41.

Material studied. TASMANIA: 1 male, 31.viii.1988, Australia, Tasmania, Devonport, 103594, pot plant, indoors, leg. L. Hill ( TAIC)  .

Diagnostic remarks. This species is characterized by the small size, 2 subapical pairs of spines on the gonostylus, one-segmented palps (without an apical pit of sensillae), very short, pin-shaped tibial spurs, and wing with both a reduced anal field and CuA stem.

Body length: 1 mm.

Economic importance. Not known to be a pest, so it is unlikely to be of economic importance.

Distribution. Papua New Guinea; Seychelles; Australia (Tasmania): new record. [Note: it is uncertain if this species is established in Tasmania as there is just one record].

TAIC

Texas A&M University-Kingsville

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Diptera

Family

Sciaridae

Genus

Hyperlasion