Scatopsciara atomaria (Zetterstedt, 1851)

Broadley, Adam, Kauschke, Ellen & Mohrig, Werner, 2018, Black fungus gnats (Diptera: Sciaridae) found in association with cultivated plants and mushrooms in Australia, with notes on cosmopolitan pest species and biosecurity interceptions, Zootaxa 4415 (2), pp. 201-242: 234

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4415.2.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:41DE1572-F169-4177-B375-D806682534F6

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/DA1B8F1B-E72A-FFE7-FF51-FAAAFCF608C8

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Scatopsciara atomaria (Zetterstedt, 1851)
status

 

Scatopsciara atomaria (Zetterstedt, 1851) 

( Fig. 17 A –DView FIGURE 17)

Sciara atomaria Zetterstedt, 1851  [Zetterstedt (1851): 3761–3762] Common synonym: Scatopsciara vivida  (winnertz, 1867)

Literature: Lengersdorf (1928 –1930): 58, plate 4, fig. 87 (as Lycoria vivida  ). Frey (1948): 70, 87, plate 20, fig. 120; Tuomikoski (1960): 151–153 (all as Scaptosciara vivida  ); Menzel & Mohrig (2000): 494–496, figs 458–463; Mohrig et al. (2013): 235–237.

Material studied: 1 male, 1.xi.2007, Australia, Sydney, biosecurity intercept (Bottle 130376), on Paeonia  plants ex Canada, leg. M. Coleman ( PABM).

Diagnostic remarks. The species is characterised by sparse hairs on the flagellomeres, with a few stronger spear-like bristles among the hairs; short 3-segmented palpi with a sensory pit on the basal segment; wings with a very short R1; apex of the hind tibia with only one spur; and the gonostylus short and curved, with a long apical tooth and 3–5 somewhat shorter subapical spines.

Economic importance. A ubiquitous and common species, particularly in areas of anthropogenic influence (Mohrig et al. 2013), but not known to be a pest.

Distribution. Holarctic. Also distributed in Central America.

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Diptera

Family

Sciaridae

Genus

Scatopsciara