Dysphania ambrosioides (L.) Mosyakin & Clemants (= Chenopodium ambrosioides L.)

DeFilipps, Robert A. & Krupnick, Gary A., 2018, The medicinal plants of Myanmar, PhytoKeys 102, pp. 1-341: 4

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/phytokeys.102.24380

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/E32DB9F3-74C2-CC01-2240-B29047D94BF5

treatment provided by

PhytoKeys by Pensoft

scientific name

Dysphania ambrosioides (L.) Mosyakin & Clemants (= Chenopodium ambrosioides L.)
status

 

Dysphania ambrosioides (L.) Mosyakin & Clemants (= Chenopodium ambrosioides L.) 

Names.

Myanmar: say-my. English: Mexican tea, strong-scented pigweed, wormseed.

Range.

Tropical America. Cultivated in Myanmar.

Uses.

Whole plant: Used as an anthelmintic, especially for roundworms but also for hookworms, as well as a remedy for intestinal amoebae.

Notes.

Medicinal uses of this species in India are discussed in Jain and DeFilipps (1991). Perry (1980) discusses the medicinal uses of the species in general, and also gives its uses in Japan, Indo-China, and the Philippines. Medicinal use, chemical constituents, pharmacological action, and of this species in Indian Ayurveda are discussed in detail by Kapoor (1990).

Reported chemical constituents of the plant include volatile oil, ascaridol, geraniol, saponin, 1-limonene, p-cymene, and d-camphor ( Perry 1980). The medicinal uses of this plant in the Caribbean region, as well as its chemistry, biological activity, toxicity and dosages, are discussed by Germosén-Robineau (1997). The chemistry, pharmacology, history and medicinal uses of this species in Latin America are discussed in detail by Gupta (1995). Details of the active chemical compounds, effects, herbal usage and pharmacological literature of this plant are given in Fleming (2000). Worldwide medicinal usage, chemical composition, and toxicity of this species are discussed by Duke (1986).

Reference.

Nordal (1963).