Allocosa marindia, Simó, Miguel, Lise, Arno A., Pompozzi, Gabriel & Laborda, Álvaro, 2017

Simó, Miguel, Lise, Arno A., Pompozzi, Gabriel & Laborda, Álvaro, 2017, On the taxonomy of southern South American species of the wolf spider genus Allocosa (Araneae: Lycosidae: Allocosinae), Zootaxa 4216 (3), pp. 261-278: 263-264

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.5281/zenodo.231813

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:BF37421F-280D-4F3C-A51B-F18FAA87D49C

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/E62987A6-9C03-FFF9-FF10-FE44FBD2FA99

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Allocosa marindia
status

sp. nov.

Allocosa marindia  sp. nov.

Figs 1View FIGURE 1, 5View FIGURE 5 A –B, 6A –B, 7F, 8A, 9

Type material. Male holotype from Marindia  (34°46'S, 55°49'W), Canelones, Uruguay, 20.XI.2007, A. Aisenberg leg. (FCE Ar 4760)GoogleMaps  . Paratypes: one female, same data (FCE Ar 4722). Two males and four females from Lagomar (34°50'S, 55°58'W), Canelones, Uruguay, 28.XI.2004, E. Álvares & M. Simó leg. (FCE Ar 2710).GoogleMaps 

Other material examined. Brazil. Río Grande do Sul. Cidreira (30°10'S, 50°12'W), 24.II.2003, J.A.M. Pinto leg., 2 females ( MCTP 16513View Materials)GoogleMaps  . Uruguay. Canelones. Lagomar (34°50'S, 55°58'W), 28.XI.2004, M. Simó & M. Viglioni leg., 1 male, 1 female, 3 immatures (FCE Ar 2711)GoogleMaps  ; ditto, M. Simó leg., 2 females (FCE Ar 7311)GoogleMaps  ; ditto, M. Simó & M. Viglioni leg., 1 female (FCE Ar 2705); Marindia  (34°46'S, 55°49'W)GoogleMaps  , I.1992, 1 male (FCE Ar 2716); ditto, 21.XI.1996, 1 female (FCE Ar 2731)GoogleMaps  ; ditto, 18.X.1996, 1 female (FCE Ar 2732)GoogleMaps  ; ditto, 2.XI.1996, 1 male (FCE Ar 2736)GoogleMaps  ; ditto, I.1995, 5 females, 4 immatures (FCE Ar 6642), all collected by F. CostaGoogleMaps  ; 1.X.2007, 1 female (FCE Ar 6019); 1 male (FCE Ar 6020); 1 male (FCE Ar 6021); 20.XI.2007, 1 female (FCE Ar 6022); 1 male (FCE Ar 6023); 1 female (FCE Ar 6024); 1 male (FCE Ar 6025); 1 female (FCE Ar 6031); 1 male (FCE Ar 6032); 1 female (FCE Ar 6033); 28.XII.2007, 1 male (FCE Ar 6017); 1 female (FCE Ar 6018); 30.I.2008, 1 male (FCE Ar 6014); 1 female (FCE Ar 6015); 1 female (FCE Ar 6016), all collected by A. Aisenberg; 17.IV.2005, M. Simó leg., 1 female, 1 immature (FCE Ar 7306). Salinas (34°47'S, 55°49'W), 30.XII.2004, M. Simó leg., 1 female (FCE Ar 2704). Santa Ana (34°47'S, 55°27'W), 8.I.2005, M. Simó leg., 1 female (FCE Ar 2709). San José. Playa Pascual (34°45'S, 56°27'W), 3.III.2012, M. Simó leg., 3 males, 5 females (FCE Ar 4552)GoogleMaps  ; ditto, 1 female (FCE Ar 6080). Montevideo. Playa Carrasco (34°53'S, 56°03'W)GoogleMaps  , 5.I.2005, M. Simó leg., 4 females (FCE Ar 7269); Playa Mulata (34°53'S, 56°04'W), 17.II.2005, M. Simó leg., 1 female (FCE Ar 7309). Rocha. Barra de Chuy-La Coronilla (33°49'S, 53°27'W)GoogleMaps  , 24.I.2012, V. Mourglia leg., 1 female, 1 immature (FCE Ar 6624); La Coronilla (33°53'S, 53°30'W), 20.I.2003, 2 females (FCE Ar 2799). Santa Teresa (34°00'S, 53°31'W), 21.XI.2009, A. Laborda leg., 2 females (FCE Ar 2995).

Diagnosis. Females of A. marindia  sp. nov. resembles A. alticeps  by the presence of vulval chambers laterally projected, but differs by the more developed lateral pointed projections on the posterior margin of the epigynum ( Figs 1View FIGURE 1 E –F). Males differ from the same species by the terminal apophysis flattened and truncated at the apex ( Fig. 6View FIGURE 6 D).

Description. Male (Holotype FCE Ar 4760). Body densely covered with setae. Carapace beige with two brown longitudinal lines and cephalic area high. Ocular edges dark brown and ocular area brownish. Thoracic grooves narrow and dark. Chelicerae dark brown. Clypeus brownish with four median setae. Labium dark brown with truncated apex. Endites dark brown, convergent, with rounded apex. Sternum beige with darker edges, acuminate posteriorly. Legs yellowish. Opisthosoma yellowish, with conspicuous brown cardiac mark and posterior brown spots; laterally and ventrally yellowish. Spinnerets yellow, densely covered with dark setae. Anterior lateral spinnerets longer than the others. Total length 8.90. Carapace 4.30 long, 4.70 wide. Clypeus 0.20 high. Eye diameters and interdistances AME 0.20, ALE 0.15, PME 0.35, PLE 0.30, AME –AME 0.10, AME –ALE 0.05, PME –PME 0.30, PME –PLE 0.40, PLE –PLE 0.75. Chelicerae 2.30 long, with three promarginal teeth, the median the largest, and three retromarginal teeth, increasing in length from basal to apical. Opisthosoma 4.7 long, 3.5 wide. Leg formula IV/I/III/II; segment length: I femur 3.10/patella 1.50/tibia 2.70/ metatarsus 2.20/ tarsus 1.40/ total 10.90. II 2.70/1.40/2.30/2.10/1.20/9.70. III 3.0/1.30/2.0/2.20/1.40/9.90. IV 3.50/1.60/3.20/3.0/1.60/12.9. Leg spination: I, femur p1ap, d1-1-1, r1-1ap; patella p1; tibia p1-1, r1-1, v2-2 -2; metatarsus p1-1-2, r1-1-2, v2-2 - 1. II, femur p1-1, d1-1-1, r1-1; patella p1; tibia p1-1, r1, v1-1 -2; metatarsus p1-1-2, r1-1-2, v2-2 - 1. III, femur p1-1, d1-1- 1, r1-1; patella p1, r1; tibia p1-1, d1, r1-1, v2-1 -2; metatarsus p 1-1-2, r1-1-2, v2-2 - 1. IV, femur p1ap, d1-1-1, r1-1; patella p1, r1; tibia p1-1, d1, r1-1, v2-1 -2; metatarsus p1-1-2, r1-1-2, v3-2 -1. Palpus: cymbium brownish, elongated, with two short and thick apical macrosetae. Terminal apophysis flattened, median apophysis with two curved projections ( Figs 1View FIGURE 1 A –D, 5A –B).

Female (Paratype FCE Ar 4722). As in male except for the following: chelicerae brown. Clypeus beige with four median setae. Total length 9.40. Carapace 4.10 long, 2.90 wide. Clypeus 0.10 high. Eye diameters and interdistances AME 0.20, ALE 0.15, PME 0.40, PLE 0.30, AME –AME 0.10, AME –ALE 0.05, PME –PME 0.3, PME –PLE 0.35, PLE –PLE 0.65. Chelicerae 2.0 long, with three promarginal teeth, the median the largest, and three retromarginal teeth, increasing in length from basal to apical. Opisthosoma 5.50 long, 3.8 wide. Leg formula IV/I/II/III; segment length: I femur 2.9/patella 1.40/tibia 2.30/ metatarsus 1.90/ tarsus 1.30/total 9.80. II 2.60/1.30/ 2.0/1.90/1.20/9.0 III 2.50/1.20/1.90/2.0/1.20/8.80. IV 3.20/1.60/2.70/2.90/1.60/12.0. Leg spination: I, femur p1ap, d1-1-1, r1-1; patella p1; tibia p1-1, r1-1, v2-2 -2; metatarsus p1-1-2, r1-1-2, v 2-2 - 1. II, femur p1-1, d1-1-1, r1-1; patella p1; tibia p1-1, r1, v2-1 -2; metatarsus p1-1-2, r1-1-2, v2-2 - 1. III, femur d1-1-1, p1-1, r1-1; patella p1, r1; tibia p1-1, d1, r1-1, v2-1 -2; metatarsus p1-1-2, r1-1-2, v2-2 - 1. IV, femur p1-1, d1-1-1, r1ap; patella p1, r1; tibia p1- 1, r1-1, v2-2 -2; metatarsus p1-1-2, r1-1-2, v3-2 -1. Palpus with conspicuous prolateral macrosetae on the patella, tibia and tarsus. Tarsal claw pectinated and well developed. Epigynum rather flat, with a setaceous plate. Copulatory openings small, situated laterally on the posterior margin of the epyginal plate ( Figs 1View FIGURE 1 E, 6A). Fertilization ducts curved and directed medially. Head of the spermathecae slightly rounded, with an apical proyection ( Figs 1View FIGURE 1 F, 6B).

Variation. Measurements, males (n=5): carapace length, 5.1–4.0; carapace width, 3.7–2.8; femur I length, 4.0– 2.9. Females (n=5): carapace length, 4.7–3.7; carapace width, 3.2–2.9; femur I length, 3.5–2.7.

Etymology. The specific epithet is a noun in apposition taken from the type locality, where, for a long time, several studies on Uruguayan wolf spiders have been developed.

Natural History. Several behavioural and ecological studies were developed on this species, which was identified as Allocosa alticeps  . Allocosa marindia  sp. nov. is simpatric and synchronic with A. senex  , but present developmental and behavioural differences that result in reproductive isolation from the other species ( Costa 1995; Costa et al. 2006). Females and males construct burrows in the sand and the species show sex roles and sexual size dimorphism reversal ( Aisenberg & Costa 2008; Aisenberg & González 2011; Aisenberg 2014; Lerette et al. 2015). As reported for A. senex  , males produce volatile pheromones ( Aisenberg et al. 2010a) and sexual dimorphism on chelicerae, forelegs and palpal traits has been reported ( Aisenberg et al. 2010b). The species lives in sandy coast (Costa 2014; Costa & Simó 2014; Aisenberg et al. 2011b) and is mainly found in areas more densely covered by psammophile vegetation, compared to A. senex  (M. Simó, pers. obs.). The diet is varied, including mainly other spiders, Diptera and Hymenoptera  and predation by A. senex  was reported ( Aisenberg et al. 2009).

Distribution. Southern Uruguay and coastal Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil ( Fig. 9View FIGURE 9).

MCTP

Museu de Ciencias

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Arachnida

Order

Araneae

Family

Lycosidae

Genus

Allocosa