Teranga Huber

Huber, Bernhard A., Eberle, Jonas & Dimitrov, Dimitar, 2018, The phylogeny of pholcid spiders: a critical evaluation of relationships suggested by molecular data (Araneae, Pholcidae), ZooKeys 789, pp. 51-101: 84-85

publication ID

http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/zookeys.789.22781

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:496949FC-A96A-4489-A094-0182520DAB6C

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/E67A0726-CF19-4CE3-ADFE-2D903D2778CB

taxon LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:act:E67A0726-CF19-4CE3-ADFE-2D903D2778CB

treatment provided by

ZooKeys by Pensoft

scientific name

Teranga Huber
status

gen. n.

Teranga Huber  gen. n.

Pholcus kerinci  group: Huber 2011a: 166.

Pholcus domingo  group: Huber et al. 2016b: 34.

Type species.

Pholcus kerinci  Huber, 2011.

Etymology.

The name is derived from the Malay word terang (bright, light), and refers to the light colouration of the spiders. Gender feminine.

Diagnosis.

Medium-sized, long-legged spiders (body length ~3.5-4.5, leg 1:~30-40) with slender elongate abdomen that is slightly elevated posteriorly ( Huber 2011a: figs 606-609, Huber et al. 2016b: figs 131-139). Easily distinguished from similar relatives in other genera ( Panjange  , Tissahamia  , Apokayana  , Paiwana  ) by unmodified or barely modified male chelicerae Huber 2011a: fig. 722; Huber et al. 2016b: fig. 142); also by combination of: eight eyes, triads only slightly elevated; male palpal trochanter with long ventral apophysis ( Huber 2011a: figs 720, 737; Huber et al. 2016b: figs 141, 158); male genital bulb without uncus but with massive appendix ( Huber 2011a: figs 719, 736; Huber et al. 2016b: figs 140, 150, 157); epigynum weakly sclerotized, with numerous transversal folds, with ‘knob’ ( Huber 2011a: figs 733, 739; Huber et al. 2016b: figs 143, 156, 159).

Distribution.

Known from Indonesia (Sumatra, Java) and the Philippines (Mindanao) ( Huber 2011a: fig. 718, Huber et al. 2016b: fig. 1).

Composition.

The genus includes the four species originally described in the Pholcus kerinci  and domingo groups. They are all newly transferred from Pholcus  : T. cibodas  (Huber, 2011); T. domingo  (Huber, 2016), T. kerinci  (Huber, 2011); T. matutum  (Huber, 2016).