Amblydromalus limonicus (Garman & McGregor)

Kreiter, Serge, Amiri, Karima, Douin, Martial, Bohinc, Tanja, Trdan, Stanislav & Tixier, Marie-Stéphane, 2020, Phytoseiid mites of Slovenia (Acari: Mesostigmata): new records and first description of the male ofAmblyseius microorientalis, Acarologia 60 (2), pp. 203-242 : 222-223

publication ID

https://doi.org/ 10.24349/acarologia/20204364

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:FA20102C-186C-4F32-90CA-EFDD21E8DAE2

DOI

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4527446

persistent identifier

https://treatment.plazi.org/id/0384D55D-E36F-4757-FE28-61E3F879FCF4

treatment provided by

Felipe

scientific name

Amblydromalus limonicus (Garman & McGregor)
status

 

Amblydromalus limonicus (Garman & McGregor)  

Amblyseius limonicus Garman & McGregor 1956: 11   .

Amblyseiopsis limonicus, Garman 1958: 72   .

Tyohlodromus (Amblyseius) limonicus, Chant 1959: 96   .

Amblyseius (Typhlodromalus) limonicus, Muma 1961: 288   .

Amblyseius (Amblyseius) limonicus, Wainstein 1962: 15   .

Typhlodromalus limonicus De Leon, 1967: 22   .

Amblydromalus limonicus, Chant & McMurtry 2005b: 207   ; 2007: 117.

Amblydromalus garmani Chant 1959: 81   (unjustified replacement name for Amblydromalus limonicus   according to Chant 1959).

Typhlodromus (Amblyseius) garmani Chant 1959: 81   (objective synonymy according to Moraes et al. 1986: 131; 2004: 199).

Amblyseius (Typhlodromalus) rapax De Leon 1965: 125   (synonymy according to Moraes et al. 1982)

This species belongs to the limonicus   species group as seta Z4 is much shorter than 40 % of the distance between its base and that of seta Z5.

Amblydromalus limonicus   was described in 1956 from citrus in California. Its distribution range covers North and South America, Australia and New Zealand. It was detected for the first time in 2011 on tomatoes in several locations of the northeastern Spain and has extended its area of distribution since this date ( Chorazy et al. 2016). It first caught the attention as natural enemy of the spider mites Oligonychus punicae (Hirst)   and T. urticae   in avocados and other fruit trees ( Knapp et al. 2013). In laboratory studies, A. limonicus   developed into adults and laid eggs on several species of mites, thrips, whiteflies and scale insects, as well as on pollen ( Knapp et al. 2013). Interest into A. limonicus   re-emerged in the early 1990s after F. occidentalis   had spread nearly all over the world. It was collected during surveys for F. occidentalis   biocontrol agents in New Zealand and Australia. Laboratory and semi-field experiments in the Netherlands and Australia showed that A. limonicus   was a very promising candidate for biological control of F. occidentalis   in several greenhouse crops ( Knapp et al. 2013). However, it was not possible to establish a commercially viable mass rearing system at this time. At around the same time A. limonicus   was also identified in surveys in South America for classical biocontrol agents for the cassava green mite, Mononychellus tanajoa (Bondar)   . Recently, a mass production system for A. limonicus   was developed and this species became commercially available in January 2012. With the material from this mass production system, more semi-field and field trials could be conducted. Results showed A. that limonicus   is also an excellent biocontrol agent for greenhouse whiteflies Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood)   in various ornamental and vegetable greenhouse crops. As this predatory mite originates from temperate areas, it is a good complement to A. swirskii   and Transeius montdorensis (Schicha)   . Both species originate from sub-tropical regions and have a higher optimum temperature than A. limonicus   . This is the first record of that species in Slovenia, probably originating from dispersion in the environment after greenhouse releases.

World distribution: Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Hawaii, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Puerto Rico, Spain, Suriname, Trinidad, USA, Venezuela.

Specimens examined: 2 ♀♀ in total. Sečovlje, 58a (aasl 3 m, lat. 45°28’43”N, long. 13°37’28”E), 2 ♀♀ on Cucurbita pepo   L. ( Cucurbitaceae   ), 19/VI/2019.

Remarks: The description and measurements of the adult females collected agree with those provided by Moraes and McMurtry (1983) and by Moraes et al. (1994).

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Arachnida

Order

Mesostigmata

Family

Phytoseiidae

Genus

Amblydromalus

Loc

Amblydromalus limonicus (Garman & McGregor)

Kreiter, Serge, Amiri, Karima, Douin, Martial, Bohinc, Tanja, Trdan, Stanislav & Tixier, Marie-Stéphane 2020
2020
Loc

Amblydromalus limonicus, Chant & McMurtry 2005b: 207

Chant D. A. & McMurtry J. A. 2007: 117
Chant D. A. & McMurtry J. A. 2005: 207
2005
Loc

Typhlodromalus limonicus

De Leon D. 1967: 22
1967
Loc

Amblyseius (Typhlodromalus) rapax

De Leon D. 1965: 125
1965
Loc

Amblyseius (Amblyseius) limonicus

Wainstein B. A. 1962: 15
1962
Loc

Amblyseius (Typhlodromalus) limonicus

Muma M. H. 1961: 288
1961
Loc

Tyohlodromus (Amblyseius) limonicus

Chant D. A. 1959: 96
1959
Loc

Amblydromalus garmani

Chant D. A. 1959: 81
1959
Loc

Typhlodromus (Amblyseius) garmani

Chant D. A. 1959: 81
1959
Loc

Amblyseiopsis limonicus

Garman P. 1958: 72
1958
Loc

Amblyseius limonicus

Garman P. & McGregor E. A. 1956: 11
1956