Catocala blandula, Hulst, 1884

Gall, Lawrence & Hawks, David, 2010, Systematics of moths in the genus Catocala (Lepidoptera, Erebidae) IV. Nomenclatorial stabilization of the Nearctic fauna, with a revised synonymic check list, ZooKeys 39 (39), pp. 37-83: 61

publication ID

http://doi.org/ 10.3897/zookeys.39.425

DOI

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3788657

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/038D2962-FF83-1B08-5EE0-FBC9FC94FD21

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Catocala blandula
status

syn. n.

Catocala blandula   syn. manitobensis Cassino   , syn. n.

Catocala blandula var. manitobensis Cassino, 1918b: 81  

Catocala blandula ssp. manitobensis   ; McDunnough 1938: 118

Catocala blandula ssp. manitobensis   ; Franclemont and Todd 1983: 129

Type material. Catocala manitobensis   : the original description states “ Holotype 1 ♁, 6 paratypes, in the collection of the author, Cartwright, Manitoba, July 17.” A female at the USNM ( USNM Type No. 44528) bears a label stating “manitobensis / Cass. / Type fide / Buchholz.” Because Cassino often missexed his material, we see no reason to challenge Buchholz’s judgment, and accept this specimen as the holotype by original designation. Cassino tabulated several characteristics supposedly distinguishing C. m. manitobensis   from nominate C. blandula Hulst, 1884   . On the dorsal forewing these included: a darker and more distinct postmedian band; a light to absent brown scaling distad from the postmedian band; and a lighter and bluish ground color, such that “the whole effect of the superiors is a bluish tint quite unlike that of blandula   , the scales of which are more brownish.” We have examined specimens of C. m. manitobensis   (including paratypes) and nominate C. blandula   from across the Nearctic, and find that the characteristics ascribed to C. m. manitobensis   occur sporadically throughout the species’ entire geographic range, especially in females, and see little merit in retaining the name manitobensis   . Exemplary localities where specimens often show manitobensis   characteristics include the vicinity of Chicago, Illinois, and the eastern seaboard of Maine and maritime Canada; the same characteristics also appear regularly in what we presently consider to be C. blandula   populations from lowland coastal areas in the southeastern USA (e.g., notably around Gainesville, Florida). These lowland C. blandula   populations are among the most morphologically variable known: some Floridian specimens (especially females) are nearly identical to types of C. manitobensis   , whereas others have the entire forewing pattern obscured by brownish black, and numerous intergrades occur. In many respects, the extreme variation in these southeastern C. blandula   populations is analogous to the extreme infrapopulational forms of both C. connubialis Guenée, 1852   and C. crataegi Saunders, 1876   seen from the same geographic region. Type Locality: Cartwright, Manitoba, [ Canada].

USNM

Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Lepidoptera

Family

Noctuidae

Genus

Catocala

Loc

Catocala blandula

Gall, Lawrence & Hawks, David 2010
2010
Loc

Catocala blandula ssp. manitobensis

Franclemont JG & Todd EL 1983: 129
1983
Loc

Catocala blandula ssp. manitobensis

McDunnough JH 1938: 118
1938
Loc

Catocala blandula var. manitobensis