Ceratina (Zadontomerus) mikmaqi Rehan & Sheffield 2011,

Gibbs, Jason, Ascher, John S., Rightmyer, Molly G. & Isaacs, Rufus, 2017, The bees of Michigan (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Anthophila), with notes on distribution, taxonomy, pollination, and natural history, Zootaxa 4352 (1), pp. 1-160: 66

publication ID

https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4352.1.1

publication LSID

lsid:zoobank.org:pub:7C684128-FFA7-48AA-B395-B9C6BC39353A

persistent identifier

http://treatment.plazi.org/id/0392879B-7334-AB65-43D5-F9D1FCDFFE87

treatment provided by

Plazi

scientific name

Ceratina (Zadontomerus) mikmaqi Rehan & Sheffield 2011
status

 

Ceratina (Zadontomerus) mikmaqi Rehan & Sheffield 2011 

County records: Allegan, Antrim, Barry, Berrien, Branch, Calhoun, Cass, Charlevoix, Cheboygan, Chippewa, Clare, Clinton, Delta, Dickinson, Eaton, Gratiot, Hillsdale, Huron, Ingham, Ionia, Jackson, Kalamazoo, Kalkaska, Lake, Lapeer, Leelanau, Lenawee, Marquette, Mecosta, Montcalm, Montmorency, Muskegon, Newaygo, Oakland, Oceana, Osceola, Ottawa, Roscommon, Saginaw, Shiawassee, St. Clair, St. Joseph, Van Buren, Washtenaw, Wayne, Wexford.

Notes. Ceratina mikmaqi  was described recently based on material from Nova Scotia, Ontario, Maryland, Nebraska, New York, Wisconsin and Kentucky ( Rehan & Sheffield 2011). Since then it has proven to be a common and widely distributed species ( Zarrillo et al. 2016). The first published record for Michigan came several years after the original description ( Carson et al. 2016). Males of C. mikmaqi  are very similar to C. dupla  and would have been treated as this species in earlier works (e.g., Daly 1973, see above). Males differ from C. dupla  by the sparse mesoscutal punctation, ecarinate hind tibia at ventral midlength, and wider T7 apical lamella. Females are similar to C. calcarata  in the sparse mesoscutal punctation, but can be distinguished from that species by the sparse pubescence of the metasomal sterna. We also reconfirm the presence of C. calcarata  and C. dupla  in Michigan. The males of C. calcarata  are distinctive, so Daly’s identifications of these remain valid. As Ceratina mikmaqi  has proven to be so widespread and abundant, we do not list specific records, but a list of counties is presented below.Nesting in Ontario described by Vickruck et al. (2011).

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Arthropoda

Class

Insecta

Order

Hymenoptera

Family

Apidae

Genus

Ceratina